Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Art and Design Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

PDF

Fiber, Textile, and Weaving Arts

Iowa State University

Apparel shopping

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Art and Design

Do Consumers’ Apparel Shopping Orientation Changes? An Exploration Of Life Event Influence, Chuanlan Liu, Yang He Jan 2013

Do Consumers’ Apparel Shopping Orientation Changes? An Exploration Of Life Event Influence, Chuanlan Liu, Yang He

International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings

Shopping orientation is defined as shopping style, which reflects shoppers’ interests, opinions, attitudes, shopping preferences, activities and behaviors prior, during and after the shopping process (Stone, 1954). Investigation of shopping orientation can determine why consumers patronize a particular type of store or choose a particular brand, which can benefit retailers for their marketing planning. Transitional life prior, during, and after experiencing events is critical phase in one’s life (Cohen, 1988). Research has documented that transitional life periods are associated with significant changes in consumer behavior in general (e.g., Andreasen, 1984).


Exploring Diversity Within The Hispanic Market: An Investigation Of Shopping Experiences Among Puerto Rican Consumers, Lorraine M. Martinez-Novoa, Nancy Hodges Jan 2013

Exploring Diversity Within The Hispanic Market: An Investigation Of Shopping Experiences Among Puerto Rican Consumers, Lorraine M. Martinez-Novoa, Nancy Hodges

International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings

Hispanics are currently the largest minority group in the United States, accounting for 16% of the total population of the country, with Mexicans, Puerto Ricans and Cubans comprising the largest subgroups (U.S. Census Bureau, 2010). Although there has been some progress in terms of defining consumption behaviors of Hispanics in general, the existing research tends to consider Hispanic consumers as a homogeneous market and therefore does not address the potential cultural differences that may exist (e.g., Chattaraman & Lennon, 2007; Seok & Sauls, 2007).