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Art and Design Commons

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Fiber, Textile, and Weaving Arts

Skidmore College

Publication Year

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Full-Text Articles in Art and Design

An Aesthetic Of Resourcefulness: Japanese Folk Textiles From The Edo Period And Beyond, Mary E. Dolden Veale Aug 2015

An Aesthetic Of Resourcefulness: Japanese Folk Textiles From The Edo Period And Beyond, Mary E. Dolden Veale

Master of Arts in Liberal Studies (MALS) Student Scholarship

This paper describes the place in time - the vernacular context in social, economic, cultural and geographic terms - in which specific utilitarian textiles -- sakiori, shifu and boro -- were produced in Japan from, roughly, the Edo (or Tokugawa), through the Meiji, Taisho, and Showa periods, or 1600 to the mid-1900's. Sakiori, shifu and boro clothing and household textiles incorporated re-purposed, recycled fibers and materials in response to conditions of poverty and harsh living conditions in rural Japan. These utilitarian artifacts affect particular aesthetic qualities, reflective of the conditions within which they were originally produced, and are resonant, to some contemporary audiences ...


Ch'ullus In Cosco: Identity In The Andes, Susan M. Kaesgen May 1999

Ch'ullus In Cosco: Identity In The Andes, Susan M. Kaesgen

Master of Arts in Liberal Studies (MALS) Student Scholarship

This study centers on the ch'ullu, the knitted cap, usually with ear flaps and an elongated peak or tail, a hat that identifies the wearer as an indigenous Andean male. The long history of the ch'ullu is marked by both its use as geographic identifier, and as a canvas upon which to present the same designs that represent ancient Andean ideas about ancestry, land and time. Because the knitted hats of today function exactly as ancient ones did, the ch'ullu is proven a descendant of ancient hats, an important element to be preserved rather than discarded for ...