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Full-Text Articles in African Languages and Societies

Conflicting Neo-Colonialist Narratives In The Representation Of Africa In Ngugi And Naipaul's Novels, Weiping Li, Xiuli Zhang Aug 2018

Conflicting Neo-Colonialist Narratives In The Representation Of Africa In Ngugi And Naipaul's Novels, Weiping Li, Xiuli Zhang

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In their article "Conflicting Neo-colonialist Narratives in the Representation of Africa in Ngugi and Naipaul's Novels" Weiping Li and Xiuli Zhang analyze the conflicting neo-colonialist narratives by comparing the different representations of the post-independent Africa between Ngugi's Petals of Blood and Naipaul's A Bend in the River. The multiple narrators in Petals of Blood expose imperialists' continuing domination of Africa, while the limited third person narrator in A Bend in the River blames the African people for the deterioration and chaos of the African society. One from an insider's perspective, the other from the outsider's ...


Literary Creolization In Layachi's A Life Full Of Holes, Maarten Van Gageldonk Dec 2016

Literary Creolization In Layachi's A Life Full Of Holes, Maarten Van Gageldonk

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his article "Literary Creolization in Layachi's A Life Full of Holes" Maarten van Gageldonk discusses the publication of Larbi Layachi's 1964 book by Grove Press based on a transcription and translation by Paul Bowles. Both Bowles and the editors at Grove Press made numerous alterations to the content and form of Layachi's tales in order to make them more accessible for readers. In the process, Layachi's book became a "cultural creole" (Hannerz). Drawing on archival materials from the Grove Press Records housed at Syracuse University, van Gageldonk examines how in its published form A Life ...


Authorship In Burroughs's Red Night Trilogy And Bowles's Translation Of Moroccan Storytellers, Benjamin J. Heal Dec 2016

Authorship In Burroughs's Red Night Trilogy And Bowles's Translation Of Moroccan Storytellers, Benjamin J. Heal

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his article "Authorship in Burroughs's Red Night Trilogy and Bowles's Translation of Moroccan Storytellers" Benjamin J. Heal discusses Paul Bowles's and William S. Burroughs's varying interrogation of the constructed nature of authorship. In his study Heal focuses on the publication history of Burroughs's Cities of the Red Night (1981), which was written with considerable collaborative influence and Bowles's translation of illiterate Moroccan storytellers, where his influence over the production and editing of the texts is blurred as are the roles of author and translator. Through an examination of Bowles's and Burroughs's ...


Thematic Bibliography To New Work On Immigration And Identity In Contemporary France, Québec, And Ireland, Dervila Cooke Dec 2016

Thematic Bibliography To New Work On Immigration And Identity In Contemporary France, Québec, And Ireland, Dervila Cooke

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

No abstract provided.


Introduction To New Work On Immigration And Identity In Contemporary France, Québec, And Ireland, Dervila Cooke Dec 2016

Introduction To New Work On Immigration And Identity In Contemporary France, Québec, And Ireland, Dervila Cooke

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

No abstract provided for the introduction.


The Figure With Recurrent Presence: The Defiant Hero In Nigerian Narratives, Ignatius Chukwumah Dec 2013

The Figure With Recurrent Presence: The Defiant Hero In Nigerian Narratives, Ignatius Chukwumah

Ignatius Chukwumah

ABSTRACT. Nigerian narratives always reveal corruption, disillusionment, mythological entities, political instability, cultural backgrounds and traditions of the tribes and nations used as context. Textual resources advertise literary works as realistic. In general, the recurring presence of the characters in these narratives is almost ignored. Unlike earlier interpretations of the Nigerian narratives, this essay is based on the theory of Frye’s five mimetic modes or categories. Based on the analysis of The Interpreters (SOYINKA, 1972) and The Famished Road (OKRI, 1992), this article examines the defiant hero as a recurring presence in Nigerian narratives. In fact, the hero is a ...


Mythic Displacement In Nigerian Narratives: An Introduction, Ignatius Chukwumah Dec 2013

Mythic Displacement In Nigerian Narratives: An Introduction, Ignatius Chukwumah

Ignatius Chukwumah

Abstract Five decades of resorting to humanistic critical procedures have bequeathed to the Nigerian critical practice the legacy of examining and discovering in Nigerian and African narratives the historical and social concepts of the time and times they are presumed to posit. These concepts include colonialism, corruption, war, political instability, and culture conflict. These procedures are undertaken without due regard to seeing the whole of the literary tradition as a stream out of which narratives emerge. This article, therefore, by way of introduction, seeks to retrieve Nigerian narratives from “every author” and humanistic critical approach by placing them in a ...


The Displaced Male-Image In Kaine Agary’S Yellow-Yellow, Ignatius Chukwumah Dec 2012

The Displaced Male-Image In Kaine Agary’S Yellow-Yellow, Ignatius Chukwumah

Ignatius Chukwumah

It has been commonly asserted that Kaine Agary’s Yellow-Yellow (2006) presents a sordid account of the deprivation of the protagonist’s subsistence livelihood by oil despoilment. This assertion is made without much regard to the repressed and manifest anxieties and desires profoundly induced in the novel’s central character by a male who is present, onto whom the absent male-figure is displaced. This article, therefore, investigates the provocations, corollaries, and correlations of the displaced male-image through its absence and presence and examines how the various offshoots of this image, whether as a father, lover, friend, autocrat or deliverer, are ...


The Symbolism Of Pollution In Beloved And Things Fall Apart, Ignatius Chukwumah Jan 2011

The Symbolism Of Pollution In Beloved And Things Fall Apart, Ignatius Chukwumah

Ignatius Chukwumah

This paper examines the symbolism of pollution in various modes in Toni Morrison’s Beloved and Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart. He explains the symbolism of pollution as a mythic form contained and apprehended in literature. The interpretative procedure he uses is Ricoeur’s hermeneutics. As a probing instrument, it draws upon similar serial structures from these works exploring contrasts and aporias. Hermeneutics fits most because of the valued qualities of authorial distanciation, explication and readings derivable from majority of presences and textual existents. Of these readings, the symbolism of pollution grasped under the aspect of fear is the ...


Buchi Emecheta : A Novelist's Image Of Nigerian Women, Kirstin Lynne Ellsworth Mar 1991

Buchi Emecheta : A Novelist's Image Of Nigerian Women, Kirstin Lynne Ellsworth

Undergraduate Honors Thesis Collection

Nigerian novelist Buchi Emecheta writes about the lives of twentieth century Nigerian women. Living during the post-World War II decades of British colonialism, and the subsequent move towards Nigerian Independence in the 1950s, Emecheta's women are affected by some of the most dramatic social and cultural changes in their country's history. Colonialism brings with it abrupt changes in the degree of political power held by Nigerians in their own country, and fosters the urbanization and expansion of market centers like Lagos, based on exploitative systems of raw material extraction for the colonial power. Imposing an increasingly western sensibility ...