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Articles 1 - 17 of 17

Full-Text Articles in African Languages and Societies

Civilizing Women: British Crusades In Colonial Sudan, Heather J. Sharkey Jul 2008

Civilizing Women: British Crusades In Colonial Sudan, Heather J. Sharkey

Departmental Papers (NELC)

No abstract provided.


A Different Shade Of Colonialism: Egypt, Great Britain, And The Mastery Of The Sudan [Review], Heather J. Sharkey Jan 2003

A Different Shade Of Colonialism: Egypt, Great Britain, And The Mastery Of The Sudan [Review], Heather J. Sharkey

Departmental Papers (NELC)

In A Different Shade of Colonialism, Eve M. Troutt Powell examines Egypt's ambiguous relationship with the Sudan in the period from approximately 1800 to the late 1920s. She suggests that this relationship was complicated by Egypt's position as a "colonized colonizer" - that is, as an imperial power in the Nile Valley which itself became vulnerable first to French and later to British colonialism. Powell focuses on Sudan- or Sudanese-related commentaries by key Egyptian thinkers, including travelers, journalists, and others, many of whom (such as Rifa'a Rafi' al-Tahtawi, Mustafa Kamil, and Huda Sha'rawi) played prominent roles in ...


The Narrator As An Editor, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2000

The Narrator As An Editor, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

In 1970, when Ruth Finnegan published her ground-breaking book Oral Literature in Africa, she devoted extensive chapters to prose narratives, proverbs, riddles, and praise poetry. She did not neglect forms in African folklore that at the time were barely studied, such as children's songs and rhymes, But to the epic she allocated in her massive book of over 550 pages only two-and-a-half pages that she set aside at the conclusion of her chapter on "Poetry and Patronage" under the title "A Note on 'Epic'" (Finnegan 1970: 108-10). Probably having in mind the works of the Chadwicks and Bowra, she ...


Review Of Heather Millar, The Kingdom Of Benin In West Africa, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1997

Review Of Heather Millar, The Kingdom Of Benin In West Africa, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Clio smiles, then weeps. A hundred years after its destruction, the empire of Benin enters the hall of fame of civilizations. Standing alongside old standards like Greece and Rome that have constituted the canon at least since the Renaissance, and next to some newcomers like the ancient Maya, the Aztec empire, China's Tang Dynasty, and India's Gupta Dynasty that have been ushered in by the spirit of multiculturalism, Benin—so far the sole representative of the African continent in the series "Cultures of the Past"— takes its position on the educational shelf that could shape the historical consciousness ...


Review Of Norbert Ndong, Kamerunishce Märchen. Text Und Kontext In Ethnosoziologischer Und Psychologischer Sicht, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1986

Review Of Norbert Ndong, Kamerunishce Märchen. Text Und Kontext In Ethnosoziologischer Und Psychologischer Sicht, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

African folklore has come of age. No longer apologetic, it assumes its position among the literatures of the nations without any pleading for its literary value, nor with any defensive rhetorics to ward off unwarrented interpretations. Native scholars are taking charge of their own literatures with a commanding authority that combines profound knowledge of their own tradition with the breadth and depth of folklore scholarship. In doing so they are setting new scholarly standards that advance our research methods from a phase of participant-observation to a new level of indigenous scholarship, leaving behind the sisyphean task of interpreting traditional texts ...


Review Of Joseph C. Miller, The African Past Speaks: Essays On Oral Tradition And History, Dan Ben-Amos May 1981

Review Of Joseph C. Miller, The African Past Speaks: Essays On Oral Tradition And History, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

The African past certainly speaks, but in what language? Is it the language of testimonies and accounts, or is it the language of metaphors, of symbols, and of structures? And once identified, what and whose code will decipher the message and unveil the secrets oral tradition both reveals and conceals? Ten scholars—all historians, Vansina vintage—join in this volume to answer these and related questions, and to counter the critique anthropologists mounted against their mentor's historical method. The eleventh contributor is Vansina himself, who has the last word.


Review Of Mabel H. Ross And Barbara K. Walker, "On Another Day..." Tales Told Among The Nkundo Of Zaire, Dan Ben-Amos Aug 1980

Review Of Mabel H. Ross And Barbara K. Walker, "On Another Day..." Tales Told Among The Nkundo Of Zaire, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

From the end of 1972 until the middle of 1974, Mrs. Mabel H. Ross, a missionary, traveled in Central Zaire among the Nkundo people, recording their oral narratives. The present volume includes the English translation of these tales, supplemented by two texts translated from the Flemish and one from Lonkundo that appeared in A. de Rop, De gesproken woordkunst van de Nkundo (Tervuren: Museé Royale du Congo Belge, 1956) and in G. Hulstaert and A. de Rop (eds.), Rechtspraakfabels van de Nkundo (Tervuren: La Commission de Linguistique Africaine, 1954), and by eighteen texts translated from Lonkundo that were first published ...


Review Of Isidore Okpewho, The Epic In Africa: Toward A Poetics Of The Oral Performance, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1980

Review Of Isidore Okpewho, The Epic In Africa: Toward A Poetics Of The Oral Performance, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

When Ruth Finnegan published her book Oral Literature in Africa (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1970), out of five hundred and fifty-eight pages she devoted only two and half pages to the epic, and even these were negative. "All in all," she wrote, "epic poetry does not seem to be a typical African form. . . .Certain elements of epic also come into many other forms of poetry and prose. But in general terms and apart from Islamic influences, epic seems to be of remarkably little significance in African oral literature, and the a priori assumption that epic is the natural form for ...


Review Of Loreto Todd, Some Day Been Dey: West African Pidgin Folktales, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1980

Review Of Loreto Todd, Some Day Been Dey: West African Pidgin Folktales, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Neither the general bibliography on African oral literature by Harold Scheub, African Oral Narratives, Proverbs, Riddles, Poetry, and Song (Boston: G. K. Hall & Co., 1977), nor the more specific bibliography by Virginia and Mark Delancety, A Bibliography of Cameroon Folklore, an Occasional Publication of the Literature Committee of the African Studies Association (Waltham, Mass.: African Studies Association, 1972) list any collection of Pidgin narratives anywhere from Africa, let alone the Cameroon. Hence the significance of the present collection of tales. Yet its import extends beyond the sheer textual documentation of narrative in a language, the use of which, it has ...


The Modern Local Historian In Africa, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1978

The Modern Local Historian In Africa, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

The introduction of literacy into African societies has added writing and printing as dimensions to the communication of historical knowledge. A by-product of this development is the availability of new information sources for historical-folkloristic research, namely, the works of local historians. In most cases these appear in thin pamphlets, published by local printers, and circulate among a local educated public; occasionally, their reading audience extends beyond the boundaries of the original indigenous community and reaches university historians, who treat these publications as if they were primary sources for historical reconstruction. They are thought to reflect the common view of the ...


Musical Instruments From Benin, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1971

Musical Instruments From Benin, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

No abstract provided.


Review Of Phillip D. Curtin, Africa Remembered: Narratives By West Africans From The Era Of Slave Trade, Dan Ben-Amos Jul 1970

Review Of Phillip D. Curtin, Africa Remembered: Narratives By West Africans From The Era Of Slave Trade, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

It has long been evident that folklore research in literate societies cannot rely exclusively on oral tradition but must incorporate data found in written sources as well. Now, indirectly, Phillip Curtin illustrates the applicability of the same methodological principle to folklorisitc investigation in traditionally nonliterate societies.


Review Of Victor Turner, The Forest Of Symbols: Aspects Of Ndembu Ritual, Dan Ben-Amos Apr 1970

Review Of Victor Turner, The Forest Of Symbols: Aspects Of Ndembu Ritual, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

The ten essays that comprise this volume deal with the ritual symbols of the Ndembu people of Zambia, south-central Africa. All except one were previously published within the last ten years. Most of them excel in analytical rigor, detailed ethnographic description, and provide stimulating theoretical suggestions. Now that these essays have been assembled in a single volume, Victor Turner's approach emerges as a fruitful research method. It could well be one of the most significant contributions any anthropologist has made to folklore studies in the past decade.


Review Of Ruth Finnegan, Limba Stories And Story-Telling, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1969

Review Of Ruth Finnegan, Limba Stories And Story-Telling, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Until recently, it was still possible for Godfrey Lienhardt, one of the general editors of The Oxford Library of African Literature, to comment that there was no good and convincing account of adults sitting together in an African village, telling stories for entertainment. (The New African, 1966: 124.) At long last, here is a book which provides exactly that: a convincing description of adult African villagers telling stories to each other as recently as our own decade. The tales they exchange are not a negligible part of their culture, a degenerated, barely remembered tradition. On the contrary, among the Limba ...


Review Of John S. Mbiti, Akamba Stories, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1969

Review Of John S. Mbiti, Akamba Stories, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

It is possible to distinguish three groups of writers on African folklore: first, amateurs, like missionaries, government officials, and African traditiophiles; second, non-African professional scholars, mainly anthropologists and linguists, and, third, their African colleagues. The main difference between these last two groups is that the Africans automatically have the inside view of their culture. They know the answers even before posing the research questions. At the same time, like their fellow anthropologists and linguists, they are equipped with the analytical concepts and methods which enable them to discuss and present this knowledge in a systematic form. Their works are potential ...


Review Of H.A.S. Johnston, A Selection Of Hausa Stories, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1969

Review Of H.A.S. Johnston, A Selection Of Hausa Stories, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Folklorists should have special interest in this volume. The Hausa people comprise one of the largest tribes in West Africa, located in present day Northern Nigeria and the adjoining parts of the Republic of Niger. Their contact with the Islamic tradition, their pursuit of trade and travel and the wide currency of their language, a true lingua franca around Hausaland, are all factors which contribute to the special significance of Hausa oral tradition. It blends indigenous African elements with Islamic themes, and serves as a meeting point for narratives of several West African tribes.


Story Telling In Benin, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 1967

Story Telling In Benin, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

One of the most significant traditions of African artists is that of the storyteller. This traditional figure remembers the legends and history of the tribe and village and passes them on to later generations in a linking of oral continuity. Modern phenomena are destroying the social cohesion in which this art form flourished, and although linguists and anthropologists are now endeavoring to record as many stories as possible, many, it is feared, have already been lost.