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Full-Text Articles in African Languages and Societies

Motivations And Obstacles On The Long Walk To Integration: Determinants Of Six Cape Town Chinese Immigrants’ Political Participation, Yawen Tsao Oct 2017

Motivations And Obstacles On The Long Walk To Integration: Determinants Of Six Cape Town Chinese Immigrants’ Political Participation, Yawen Tsao

Independent Study Project (ISP) Collection

Political participation is a fundamental component of democracy. But the level of immigrants’ political participation is generally lower than for people who are perceived as natives. This paper identifies the determinants of six Chinese immigrants’ political participation in Cape Town, part of a group that has a long history of political integration but is still often seen as passive and apolitical. It argues and tests the effect of five main determinants related to the length of residence, interaction with the local Chinese association, socioeconomic background, language ability and prior political experience, and social perceptions. Data comes from interviews conducted with ...


Humanity On The Verge Of Insanity: Maintaining Cultural Identity Against Oppressive Rule, Danica Katarina Skoric May 2017

Humanity On The Verge Of Insanity: Maintaining Cultural Identity Against Oppressive Rule, Danica Katarina Skoric

Senior Theses and Capstone Projects

Ubuntu is a South African term in the Bantu language that translates to “human kindness.” This essay discusses the present-day impact of the South African philosophical concept of Ubuntu in light of the dehumanization, which Aboriginal Australians and Black South Africans faced, specifically during the period of 1960-1985. How has humanity been enslaved and degraded by assimilation and a cruel division of races, yet positively evolved and progressed due to the efforts of both female and male activists--in particular literary figure Oodgeroo Noonuccal and political leader Nelson Mandela? A lack of respect and tolerance as a result of colonialism has ...


Negotiating Globalization From Below: Social Entrepreneurship, Neoliberalism, And The Making Of The New South African Subject, Oceane Jasor Sep 2016

Negotiating Globalization From Below: Social Entrepreneurship, Neoliberalism, And The Making Of The New South African Subject, Oceane Jasor

FIU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Neoliberal globalization can threaten the growth of a global civil society that sanctions power-sharing arrangements. Yet, scholarship that focuses unidirectionally on global processes may in effect eviscerate the transformative power of the local. To counter this tendency, this dissertation examines the interrelationships between contextualized and historically-specific experiences in South Africa and transnational processes through a case study of social entrepreneurship, an emerging global justice movement. Drawing on a 12-months institutional ethnography of Sonke Gender Justice, a transnational social entrepreneurship NGO working to achieve gender equality, prevent gender-based violence and reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS in Southern Africa, this dissertation ...


From John S. Mbiti To Jacob K. Olupona: A Literary Journey In Review, Regennia N. Williams Jan 2016

From John S. Mbiti To Jacob K. Olupona: A Literary Journey In Review, Regennia N. Williams

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Empire Unbound - Imperial Citizenship, Race And Diaspora In The Making Of South Africa, Khwezi Mkhize Jan 2015

Empire Unbound - Imperial Citizenship, Race And Diaspora In The Making Of South Africa, Khwezi Mkhize

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

"Empire Unbound" is an exploration of the history and politics of empire and imperial citizenship that went into the making of South Africa before the Second World War. The making of racial difference in South Africa is often located in the temporal and political terrain that is Apartheid (1948-1994). In this dissertation I look to the history of South Africa in the long nineteenth century and recuperate the frameworks of empire and imperial citizenship in making sense of struggles for belonging. Empire, both as a form of government and imaginary, invokes a degree of scale that exceeds the nation-state. It ...


Skin Bleaching In South Africa: A Result Of Colonialism And Apartheid?, Nahomie Julien Jan 2014

Skin Bleaching In South Africa: A Result Of Colonialism And Apartheid?, Nahomie Julien

DISCOVERY: Georgia State Honors College Undergraduate Research Journal

South Africans have not overcome many of the psychological effects of apartheid and colonialism, some of which are self-hatred and low self-esteem. These negative psychosomatic influences often push people to alter their physical appearance to feel better about themselves, and one of the most common methods of doing so is by bleaching the skin(Abrahams, 2000; Charles, 2003; Singham, 1968). Skin bleaching, the application of topical creams, gels, soaps, and household products (e.g., toothpaste, bleach, washing powder, battery acid) to lighten the skin, has become one of the most common forms of potentially harmful body modification practices in the ...


Rediscovering Roots: The South Africa Of Literature Post-Colonization, Heidi Wilson Dec 2013

Rediscovering Roots: The South Africa Of Literature Post-Colonization, Heidi Wilson

Honors Senior Theses/Projects

The focus of this thesis is to examine the effects of colonization on the development of cultural identity within South Africa. My approach is to look at prominent authors who are widely recognized as writers who illustrate the ongoing quest in South African for identity through literary work. The novels contain common themes and portrayals of the interactions between the races as well as the overall growth of the characters and their communities.


The Hegemony Of English In South African Education, Kelsey E. Figone Apr 2012

The Hegemony Of English In South African Education, Kelsey E. Figone

Scripps Senior Theses

The South African Constitution recognizes 11 official languages and protects an individual’s right to use their mother-tongue freely. Despite this recognition, the majority of South African schools use English as the language of learning and teaching (LOLT). Learning in English is a struggle for many students who speak indigenous African languages, rather than English, as a mother-tongue, and the educational system is failing its students. This perpetuates inequality between different South African communities in a way that has roots in the divisions of South Africa’s past. An examination of the power of language and South Africa’s experience ...