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African Languages and Societies Commons

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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in African Languages and Societies

Everyday Violence And Women's Lives In Zambia: An Autoethnography, Amina Shikupilwa May 2018

Everyday Violence And Women's Lives In Zambia: An Autoethnography, Amina Shikupilwa

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Gender inequality has been a prominent feature of human societies for the longest time. Zambia, like most countries in Africa, is very conservative and patriarchal in nature. In a typical Zambian household, the male is the head of the family. I am going to talk about my experiences as a female growing in a culture that was highly patriarchal and traditional, and how those experiences have shaped me into the person that I am today. Central to my experiences, is the issue of violence in our home which I experienced from a young age. Domestic Violence is prevalent in most ...


Black Panther As Spirit Trip, Laurel Zwissler Mar 2018

Black Panther As Spirit Trip, Laurel Zwissler

Journal of Religion & Film

This is one of a series of film reviews of Black Panther (2018), directed by Ryan Coogler. This review analyzes engagement with the movie as a religious experience and considers some political implications of both its storyline and reception. In particular, the piece focuses on constructions of race, especially in relationship to Africa and African Americans, as well as practical tensions around commodifying dissent.


A Borrowed Language, Yvonne Osei Apr 2016

A Borrowed Language, Yvonne Osei

Graduate School of Art Theses

Art has the potency of mediation: bridging human differences, questioning voids in historical trajectories, negotiating spaces of relevance, and most importantly, being signifiers that embody the absent. I speak in a borrowed language, a multilingual visual tongue, inspired by a culmination of Western and African Art modes of practices to create charged platforms for multicultural communication.

My art presents visual portals that allow for intercultural and interracial mingling as issues of colorism, present-day colonialism, gender inequality and the politics of dress are foregrounded for collective deliberation. The essence of the work is often activated and brought to its full potential ...


Skin Bleaching In South Africa: A Result Of Colonialism And Apartheid?, Nahomie Julien Jan 2014

Skin Bleaching In South Africa: A Result Of Colonialism And Apartheid?, Nahomie Julien

DISCOVERY: Georgia State Honors College Undergraduate Research Journal

South Africans have not overcome many of the psychological effects of apartheid and colonialism, some of which are self-hatred and low self-esteem. These negative psychosomatic influences often push people to alter their physical appearance to feel better about themselves, and one of the most common methods of doing so is by bleaching the skin(Abrahams, 2000; Charles, 2003; Singham, 1968). Skin bleaching, the application of topical creams, gels, soaps, and household products (e.g., toothpaste, bleach, washing powder, battery acid) to lighten the skin, has become one of the most common forms of potentially harmful body modification practices in the ...


God Loves Uganda, John C. Lyden Jan 2013

God Loves Uganda, John C. Lyden

Journal of Religion & Film

This is a film review of God Loves Uganda (2013) directed by Roger Ross Williams.


Censuring The Praise Of Alienation: Interstices Of Ante-Alienation In Things Fall Apart, No Longer At Ease, And Arrow Of God, Kevin Frank Oct 2011

Censuring The Praise Of Alienation: Interstices Of Ante-Alienation In Things Fall Apart, No Longer At Ease, And Arrow Of God, Kevin Frank

Publications and Research

Interrogating Abiola Irele’s largely unchallenged praise of alienation, this essay is bold and insightful in returning to Chinua Achebe’s African trilogy to examine the subtler, equally dangerous agent of externality: ante-alienation, or social alienation within traditional African culture, which precedes race-based, colonial alienation. This ante-alienation challenges Négritude’s paradisiacal view of Africa and raises questions about Africans always being happiest with themselves within their traditional culture.