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Full-Text Articles in African Languages and Societies

Patwa Is A Language; No Ifs, Buts Or Maybes, Rashana Lydner May 2017

Patwa Is A Language; No Ifs, Buts Or Maybes, Rashana Lydner

Senior Honors Theses

Is Patwa a language? Linguistically speaking, Jamaican Creole is seen as a language. However, culturally there are many misconceptions about the status and importance of the language. This research focuses on a linguistic analysis of Jamaican Creole. Firstly, it emphasizes the diachronic linguistic aspects of the language, examining the origins of the language. British English played a very influential part in the development of Jamaican Creole as well as the Niger-Congo languages from West Africa. One sees how historically intertwined the Creole is with the context of slavery and the formation of other Creole languages across the colonial world. Secondly ...


Oshun, Xica And The Sambista: The Black Female Body As Image Of Nationalist Expression, Oluyinka A. Akinjiola May 2014

Oshun, Xica And The Sambista: The Black Female Body As Image Of Nationalist Expression, Oluyinka A. Akinjiola

Dance Master’s Theses

The context of this work explores black female iconography from the African Diaspora including Oshún, Xica da Silva, and the Deusa de Ebano. These representations of black female dancing bodies are integrated into images of nationalist expressions in Brazil, Cuba and Nigeria. Oshún, the Yoruba deity from Nigeria and Benin represents ultimate femininity from the African perspective. Xica da Silva was an Afro-Brazilian slave who became the richest woman in Minas Gerais through her romantic union with João Fernandez. The Deusa de Ebano, or ebony goddess, becomes the symbol of blocos afros during the yearly celebration of Carnaval in Salvador ...