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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Against A Process View Of Divine Patience, Luke Asher May 2015

Against A Process View Of Divine Patience, Luke Asher

Global Tides

When one chooses to tolerate suffering, waiting calmly without reacting emotively or physically, he is demonstrating the virtue of patience. Process theology claims that the patience of God is more or less identical to the experience of human patience. That is, when we sin and rebel against God, He refrains from smiting us, that we might repent and return to Him. In other words, God demonstrates patience when he restrains Himself temporally from interfering with or punishing mankind, waiting for their repentance. Such an explanation of divine patience may seem intuitive, but the patience of God is much greater, much ...


The Awakening Of Knowledge In The Heart Of Egypt: An Exegesis Of Exodus 7:1-5, Andrew Krawtz Jan 2013

The Awakening Of Knowledge In The Heart Of Egypt: An Exegesis Of Exodus 7:1-5, Andrew Krawtz

Global Tides

Exodus 7:1-5 is the fourth reiteration of God’s commands to Moses regarding Pharaoh and the Israelites, with the others being in Exod 3, 4:21-23, and 6:1-13. With these passages and the resulting plagues, readers have raised questions regarding God’s powerfulness and good nature. For example, if God is all-powerful and good, why does he not just liberate the Israelites immediately, instead of dragging it out through ten plagues while manipulating Pharaoh, seemingly exacerbating the general suffering of people and land? My proposed answer to these concerns lies in the focus of this passage, which is ...


The Missional Approach Of The Acts 29 Church Planting Movement, Marylyn Sohlberg Jan 2013

The Missional Approach Of The Acts 29 Church Planting Movement, Marylyn Sohlberg

Global Tides

Missional churches, those that bring Jesus outside the walls of the church and into the unknown, unreached, and uncomfortable areas in the United States and the world, seem to have taken center stage in the realm of popular Christian discussion over the past few decades. However, roughly thirty percent of the globe remains untargeted by “missional churches.” In his book “Planting Missional Churches,” Ed Stetzer highlights the need for missional churches in the U.S. in particular, citing a Gallup poll that observed eighty percent of American churches in decline. In 2011, Gallup also estimated an average of forty-five percent ...


Changing Hearts: The Future Of The Environmental Movement, Emily Casey Jan 2011

Changing Hearts: The Future Of The Environmental Movement, Emily Casey

Global Tides

For many, the environmental movement is a consumer fad with very little intellectual or emotional investment. Generally, sustainability is deemed a “good thing” but given low priority at both the personal level and the public policy level. In this paper, I argue that environmentalism must be modified to meet the needs of the general populace in order to gain momentum as a contemporary political movement. In other words, I examine how the environmental movement can attract the massive number of active members necessary to change public policy and conclude that this movement will need to adapt to the public in ...


The Journey To Jesus: John 4:19-26, Andrew Hagen Jan 2011

The Journey To Jesus: John 4:19-26, Andrew Hagen

Global Tides

John 4:19-26 is a part of Jesus’ conversation with the Samaritan woman at the well. This portion of the conversation includes Jesus’ first revelation of himself as the Messiah and the only way to the Father in what Eric John Wyckoff calls an “astonishing self-revelation unparalleled in its explicitness.” Jesus’ later claims develop these ideas further (John 8:24, 28, 58; 13:19; 18:5) but this scene serves to not only reveal Jesus as the Messiah-Christ but also to demonstrate how Jesus transcends all the expectations which are associated with the title.


Sola Fide, The New Perspective On Paul, And The Involuntariness Of Belief, Peter Zuk Jan 2011

Sola Fide, The New Perspective On Paul, And The Involuntariness Of Belief, Peter Zuk

Global Tides

This article argues that the doctrine of sola fide is deeply problematic on the basis of two widely accepted philosophic principles, and then attempts to treat the problem exegetically. The article begins by showing that the “ought implies can” principle, which states that agents can only be held morally responsible for performing or not performing acts within their power, presents apparent problems for sola fide when examined alongside doxastic involuntarism, which holds that agents are incapable of choosing their beliefs. Sola fide, however, has been essential to the traditional interpretation of core Pauline texts. The author attempts to resolve the ...