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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Wearing Memories: Clothing And The Global Lives Of Mourning In Swaziland, Casey Golomski Sep 2015

Wearing Memories: Clothing And The Global Lives Of Mourning In Swaziland, Casey Golomski

Anthropology Scholarship

This article situates a cultural phenomenon of women’s memory work through clothing in Swaziland. It explores clothing as both action and object of everyday, personalized practice that constitutes psychosocial well-being and material proximities between the living and the dead, namely, in how clothing of the deceased is privately possessed and ritually manipulated by the bereaved. While human and spiritual self-other relations are produced through clothing and its material efficacy, current global ideologies of immaterial mortuary ritual associated with Pentecostalism have emerged as contraries to this local, intersubjective grief work. This article describes how such contrarian ideologies paper over existing ...


Sights-Of-Interest: Denial Of Danger In Living Spaces, Rachel Lambert May 2015

Sights-Of-Interest: Denial Of Danger In Living Spaces, Rachel Lambert

Boise State University Theses and Dissertations

Exploring the illusion of protection, I constructed a fiber-based installation to recreate the experience of photographing outside and inside living spaces. This body of work is about the allure of the photographic experience. It is about the experience of seeing, noticing, and thinking that occurs while looking through the camera’s viewfinder. It is about unconsciously ignoring the physical dangers that live in the picturesque land photographed.

In response, I created a two room installation. Two household living rooms are staged as conceptual “living spaces.” One room simulates a damp swamp floor; and the other, the interior of a warm-blooded ...


Via Negativa, Stephanie J. Rue May 2015

Via Negativa, Stephanie J. Rue

Theses and Dissertations

Via Negativa is my response to a linear, rational, Western framework of expressing and experiencing religion, as well as of reading. This project represents a shift away from Protestant Reformed thinking. It has meant an embrace of the unknown, a celebration of darkness, and an exploration of ancient religious texts to find meaning. This essay describes formative experiences and past artwork leading up to Via Negativa, as well as a description of the project itself.