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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Jane Eyre: The Bridge Between Christianity And Folklore, Teagan Lewis Oct 2018

Jane Eyre: The Bridge Between Christianity And Folklore, Teagan Lewis

Student Publications

Charlotte Brontё’s acclaimed novel, Jane Eyre, was first marketed as an autobiography. The story, told from the point of view of a poor orphan girl, takes on a narrative similar to that of a fairytale. In this way, a reader may find difficulty in believing this novel to be a work of nonfiction. Charlotte Brontё employs aspects of both Christianity and fantasy in her novel not to discourage her readers from believing its validity but rather to emphasize how even poor orphan girls like Jane have forces of good guiding them. Jane Eyre is fictional, yet the hardships she ...


Theology And Poetry: Literary Aesthetics In The Writing Of Ann Voskamp, Erin Peters Jun 2018

Theology And Poetry: Literary Aesthetics In The Writing Of Ann Voskamp, Erin Peters

Masters Theses

Because of her work as an author, speaker, blogger, and Compassion International advocate, Christianity Today cited Ann Voskamp as one of the 50 most influential women in shaping the North American evangelical church. Through her poetic, spiritual memoirs, Voskamp has challenged and inspired Christian women in their walk with God while simultaneously raising an important question for Christian literature: What roles does the poetic imagination play in communicating theology? To be sure however, Voskamp’s unique blend of poetic lyricism and personally applied theology has incited significant criticism regarding her loosely constructed language and narrative interpretation of Scripture. This thesis ...


Flannery O’Connor And Transcendence In The Christian Mystery Of Grace, Taran Trinnaman Apr 2018

Flannery O’Connor And Transcendence In The Christian Mystery Of Grace, Taran Trinnaman

Student Works

Within Flannery O’Connor’s works are the repeating themes of grace and salvation. Kathleen G. Ochshorn points one major criticism towards O’Connor’s works however in that her morally flawed characters’ reception of grace and salvation comes through violent or traumatic means, which appears counter to the Roman Catholic faith of Flannery O’Connor. This paper argues against this reading of Flannery O’Connor’s works by examining the Catholic theology surrounding grace alongside the theology of grace as understood through Protestantism. The paper then places three of Flannery O’Connor’s works, “Greenleaf,” “Revelation,” and “The Enduring ...


Turning “Bad Jews Into Worse Christians”: Hermann Adler And The London Society For Promoting Christianity Amongst The Jews, Robert Ellison Mar 2018

Turning “Bad Jews Into Worse Christians”: Hermann Adler And The London Society For Promoting Christianity Amongst The Jews, Robert Ellison

English Faculty Research

This paper explores how sermons contributed to Jewish-Christian relations in Victorian England. I begin with a rhetorical analysis of sermons preached on behalf of the London Society for Promoting Christianity among the Jews, the largest and best known missionary organization of its kind. I then examine a collection of sermons in which Hermann Adler, then rabbi of London’s Bayswater Synagogue and later Chief Rabbi of the British Empire, pushes back against their efforts, offering the “true explanations” of passages which, in his view, had been improperly employed by Christian preachers. Finally, I trace a kind of “feedback loop” in ...


Practical Christianity: Religion In Jane Austen's Novels, Erin R. Toal Nov 2017

Practical Christianity: Religion In Jane Austen's Novels, Erin R. Toal

Senior Honors Theses

A beloved English novelist of the late eighteenth century, Jane Austen captures the attention and emotion of readers through timeless insights into the inner workings of the human heart as characters navigate society, family life, and love. Her novels’ attention to practical morality but reticence toward explicitly religious subject matter raises conjecture concerning the religion behind her values; however, Austen’s Christian upbringing, Anglican practice, and Christian values suggest a foundation of faith from which the morality in her novels emanates. In Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Mansfield Park, Austen demonstrates her eighteenth-century Anglican worldview in the lives ...


The Shadowland Of Shakespeare: Christianity And The Carnival, Micah E. Cozzens Feb 2017

The Shadowland Of Shakespeare: Christianity And The Carnival, Micah E. Cozzens

Student Works

The moral complexity of Shakespeare’s work is created by balancing carnival elements such as subversion of authority, plays within plays, and ascension of thrones, with Christian elements such as repentance, the supernatural, and forgiveness. Far from being didactic or moralizing, Shakespeare’s plays—specifically King Lear, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Hamlet—frequently inhabit an ethical shadowland, in which right becomes wrong and wrong becomes right. This intricacy renders even the simplest of his plots an interesting exploration of human consciousness. But Shakespeare never exalts Christianity at the expense of the carnival nor the carnival at the expense ...


Shylock Celebrates Easter, Brooke Conti Nov 2015

Shylock Celebrates Easter, Brooke Conti

English Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Mad Hero In A Box: Christianity, Secular Humanism, And The Monomyth In Doctor Who, Sabrina Hardy Aug 2015

Mad Hero In A Box: Christianity, Secular Humanism, And The Monomyth In Doctor Who, Sabrina Hardy

Masters Theses

Doctor Who is a long-running, incredibly popular work of television science-fiction, with a devoted fanbase across the Western world. Like all science fiction, it deals with the weighty questions posed by the culture around it, particularly in regards to ethics, politics, faith/belief, and the idea of the soul. These concepts are dealt with through the lens of the Secular Humanist ideology held by the showrunners and by many of the people who watch the show; however, in many areas, elements of the Christian worldview seep through. The conflict between these two worldviews has serious ramifications for the show itself ...


Holy Places, Dark Paths: Till We Have Faces And The Spiritual Conflicts Of C.S. Lewis, Joshua G. Novalis Apr 2015

Holy Places, Dark Paths: Till We Have Faces And The Spiritual Conflicts Of C.S. Lewis, Joshua G. Novalis

Senior Honors Theses

Although Till We Have Faces (1956) was written late in C.S. Lewis’s life (1898-1963), during the peak of his literary renown, the novel remains one of Lewis’s least known and least accessible works. Due to its relatively ancient and obscure source material, as well as its tendency towards the esoteric, a healthy interpretation of the novel necessitates a wider look at Lewis’s life-long body of work. By approaching Till We Have Faces through the framework of Lewis and the corpus of his work, the reader can see two principal conflicts that characterize the work as a ...


Struggling Towards Salvation: Narrative Structure In James Baldwin's Go Tell It On The Mountain, Darren Spirk Apr 2015

Struggling Towards Salvation: Narrative Structure In James Baldwin's Go Tell It On The Mountain, Darren Spirk

Student Publications

This paper argues that John Grimes, the protagonist of James Baldwin's Go Tell It on the Mountain, represents the struggle inherent in the path towards salvation and holds the potential ability to break down the binaries that create this struggle. Of particular interest is a similarity in the narrative framing of John’s story with Jesus Christ's, as told in the four Gospels. The significance of both their symbolic power is dependent on a multitude of narrative viewpoints, in John’s case the tragic pasts offered of his aunt, father and mother in the novel’s medial section ...


Presence In Absence In Shakespeare's King Lear, Kimberly Austin Mar 2015

Presence In Absence In Shakespeare's King Lear, Kimberly Austin

Student Works

King Lear is imbedded with hidden Christian themes, expressed through characters like Cordelia and the Fool, to show that salvation and redemption can only be obtained in a world with Christ. The audience recognizes the absence of Christian principles in the play and through our desire for Christianity it becomes a present theme.The theory of presence in absence becomes clearer when analyzing Cordelia and the Fool. Their characteristics mimic those of Christ which reminds the audience of his absence in the play. Throughout the play King Lear repeats the theory of “nothing from nothing” and by analyzing this theme ...


Pervasive Parable: Christ And Ligeia, Todd Workman Mar 2015

Pervasive Parable: Christ And Ligeia, Todd Workman

Student Works

No abstract provided.


Reconciling Christianity And Paganism, Susanna L. Mills Oct 2014

Reconciling Christianity And Paganism, Susanna L. Mills

Student Publications

In her novel "Jane Eyre," Charlotte Bronte works to bring opposing ideas of Christianity and Paganism together to strengthen her protagonist, Jane. Bronte uses symbols of supernaturalism, nature, and the moon to highlight Jane's complex spiritual growth. This essay explores those symbols in conjunction with Christianity and their influences on Jane Eyre as she becomes an empowered woman.


Jesus Lives, But Should He Live In My Front Yard?, Christin N. Taylor Apr 2014

Jesus Lives, But Should He Live In My Front Yard?, Christin N. Taylor

English Faculty Publications

As I drove home from church, I eyed the bright foam sign my 6-year-old daughter held. “Jesus is Alive” it read in kid scrawl. “We’re supposed to put them in our yards!” Noelle beamed, eyeing her creation proudly through pink-rimmed glasses.

I imagined our wide, open yard in Pennsylvania, the green grass stretching without fences from one neighbor to the next. Our best friends in the neighborhood, secular humanists, would easily see it. I cringed. What would they think? [excerpt]


Bones, Frogs, And Killers: The Corporeal Oppression Of Women In The Patriarchal, Christian South, Shawna F. Felkins May 2013

Bones, Frogs, And Killers: The Corporeal Oppression Of Women In The Patriarchal, Christian South, Shawna F. Felkins

Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

Both Alice Walker and Dorothy Allison create female protagonists who face corporeal oppression in their works The Color Purple and Bastard out of Carolina, respectively. It these protagonist’s feminine gender that allows the men in their lives to control them. Connecting these two authors and validating there assertions of the power of patriarchy to oppress women through the physical body, is author Lillian Smith and her work Killers of the Dream. There is a connecting thread running through these works that explains the reign of patriarchal oppression in the South: Christianity. Women, especially those in the Christian culture of ...


"Just A Fool's Hope": J.R.R. Tolkien's Eucatastrophe As The Paradigm Of Christian Hope, Margaret A. Bush Jul 2012

"Just A Fool's Hope": J.R.R. Tolkien's Eucatastrophe As The Paradigm Of Christian Hope, Margaret A. Bush

Senior Honors Theses

In his essay titled “On Fairy-Stories,” J.R.R. Tolkien uses the term “eucatastrophe” to describe the unexpected, fortunate turn of events for the protagonist in a fantasy story. Tolkien applies the word beyond its literary context to signify the Christian’s experience of joy, especially resulting from the Incarnation and Resurrection. Such an explicit link between fiction and theology seems absent from his more well-known work, The Lord of the Rings. Yet both Tolkien himself and critics of his writing have labeled the novel a modern-day classic of Christian literature. This thesis will defend the Christian label of The ...


C. S. Lewis And Rene Girard On Desire, Conversation, And Myth: The Case Of Till We Have Faces, Curtis A. Gruenler Jan 2011

C. S. Lewis And Rene Girard On Desire, Conversation, And Myth: The Case Of Till We Have Faces, Curtis A. Gruenler

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


An Examination Of William Faulkner's Use Of Biblical Symbolism In Three Early Novels: The Sound And The Fury, As I Lay Dying, And Light In August, Richard North Apr 2009

An Examination Of William Faulkner's Use Of Biblical Symbolism In Three Early Novels: The Sound And The Fury, As I Lay Dying, And Light In August, Richard North

Masters Theses

During the years 1928-1932, William Faulkner wrote and published three novels containing varying but significant amounts of Biblical content and symbolism: The Sound and the Fury (1929), As I Lay Dying (1930), and Light in August (1932). In The Sound and the Fury, the characters of Benjy and Quentin Compson share some characteristics of Christ figures, but receive irony-laden treatment. The novel, however, presents the purest Christian character of this period of Faulkner's writing--the Compson family's Negro servant Dilsey. The Bible holds a similar influence over As I Lay Dying, specifically in the Old Testament. The Christian characters ...


D. Taylor And D. Beauregard, Shakespeare And The Culture Of Christianity In Early Modern England, Christopher P. Baker Jan 2005

D. Taylor And D. Beauregard, Shakespeare And The Culture Of Christianity In Early Modern England, Christopher P. Baker

Literature Faculty Publications

This book review was published in Renaissance Quarterly.


Newspaper Editors’ Attitudes Toward The Great Awakening, 1740-1748, Lisa Smith May 2004

Newspaper Editors’ Attitudes Toward The Great Awakening, 1740-1748, Lisa Smith

Humanities and Teacher Education Division Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Donne, Doubt And The Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, Brooke Conti Jan 2003

Donne, Doubt And The Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, Brooke Conti

English Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Moses And The Egyptian: Religious Authority In Olaudah Equiano's Iteresting Narrative, Eileen Razzari Elrod Jan 2001

Moses And The Egyptian: Religious Authority In Olaudah Equiano's Iteresting Narrative, Eileen Razzari Elrod

English

From the first image that greeted readers of his book, Olaudah Equiano presented the self of his 1789 autobiographical narrative as a pious Christian, one whose religious conversion meant a kind of freedom as significant as his manumission from slavery. In the striking frontispiece portrait Equiano sits with biblical text in hand, insisting-in his visual as in his textual presentations of himself-that the Christianity he embraces is the defining feature of his life-story. He responds, as Susan Marren has suggested, to two paradoxical imperatives: one, to write himself into creation as a speaking subject and, two, to write an antislavery ...