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Pepperdine University

Biblical Studies

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The Awakening Of Knowledge In The Heart Of Egypt: An Exegesis Of Exodus 7:1-5, Andrew Krawtz Jan 2013

The Awakening Of Knowledge In The Heart Of Egypt: An Exegesis Of Exodus 7:1-5, Andrew Krawtz

Global Tides

Exodus 7:1-5 is the fourth reiteration of God’s commands to Moses regarding Pharaoh and the Israelites, with the others being in Exod 3, 4:21-23, and 6:1-13. With these passages and the resulting plagues, readers have raised questions regarding God’s powerfulness and good nature. For example, if God is all-powerful and good, why does he not just liberate the Israelites immediately, instead of dragging it out through ten plagues while manipulating Pharaoh, seemingly exacerbating the general suffering of people and land? My proposed answer to these concerns lies in the focus of this passage, which is ...


What Does The Mob Want Lot To Do In Genesis 19:9?, R. Christopher Heard Jan 2010

What Does The Mob Want Lot To Do In Genesis 19:9?, R. Christopher Heard

Religion Division Faculty Scholarship

Most English Bible translations render [Hebrew text A-B] in Gen 19:9 with some variant of “Stand back!” However, a very few interpreters recommend a translation along the lines of “Come closer!” more in keeping with the typical gloss on [Hebrew text A]. A detailed study of the syntax and semantics of both [Hebrew text A] and [Hebrew text B], as well as constructions similar to [Hebrew text A-B] demonstrates the strength of the minority suggestion.


The Dao Of Qoheleth: An Intertextual Reading Of The Daode Jing And The Book Of Ecclesiastes, R. Christopher Heard Jan 1996

The Dao Of Qoheleth: An Intertextual Reading Of The Daode Jing And The Book Of Ecclesiastes, R. Christopher Heard

Religion Division Faculty Scholarship

Of all the world's literary works which may appropriately be labeled religious classics, the Hebrew scriptures and the Daode Jing stand out as two of the most popular across cultural and linguistic boundaries. One might suppose that the cross-cultural popularity of these classics would have brought them into frequent contact with one another. However, not much seems to have been done to relate the Bible to the Daode Jing in a constructive way. In this article, I seek to begin redressing this lack of conversation by offering a reading of the biblical book of Ecclesiastes using the Daode Jing ...