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Articles 1 - 15 of 15

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Mutilation And The Law In Early Medieval Europe And India: A Comparative Study -- Open Access, Patricia E. Skinner Dec 2016

Mutilation And The Law In Early Medieval Europe And India: A Comparative Study -- Open Access, Patricia E. Skinner

The Medieval Globe

This essay examines the similarities and differences between legal and other precepts outlining corporal punishment in ancient and medieval Indian and early medieval European laws. Responding to Susan Reynolds’s call for such comparisons, it begins by outlining the challenges in doing so. Primarily, the fragmented political landscape of both regions, where multiple rulers and spheres of authority existed side-by-side, make a direct comparison complex. Moreover, the time slippage between what scholarship understands to be the “early medieval” period in each region needs to be taken into account, particularly given the persistence of some provisions and the adapatation or abandonment ...


The Edict Of King Gälawdéwos Against The Illegal Slave Trade In Christians: Ethiopia, 1548 -- Featured Source, Habtamu M. Tegegne Dec 2016

The Edict Of King Gälawdéwos Against The Illegal Slave Trade In Christians: Ethiopia, 1548 -- Featured Source, Habtamu M. Tegegne

The Medieval Globe

This study explores the relationship between documentary-legal prescriptions of slavery and actual practice in late medieval Ethiopia. It does so in light of a newly discovered edict against the enslavement of freeborn Christians and the commercial sale of Christians to non-Christian owners, issued in 1548 by King Gälawdéwos. It demonstrates that this edict emerged from a dramatic and violent encounter between the neighboring Sultanate of Adal, which was supported by Muslim powers, and the Christian kingdom of Ethiopia, which had the support of expanding European powers in the region. The edict was therefore issued to reaffirm and clarify the principles ...


The Fourth Crusade: An Analysis Of Sacred Duty ‌, Dale Robinson Dec 2016

The Fourth Crusade: An Analysis Of Sacred Duty ‌, Dale Robinson

Honors Theses

The crusades were a Christian enterprise. They were proclaimed in the name of God for the service of the church. Religion was the thread which bound crusaders together and united them in a single holy cause. When crusaders set out for a holy war they took a vow not to their feudal lord or king, but to God. The Fourth Crusade was no different. Proclaimed by Pope Innocent III in 1201, it was intended to recover Christian control of the Levant after the failure of past endeavors. Crusading vows were exchanged for indulgences absolving all sins on behalf of the ...


Finding Chinese Jesus: Chinese Christians And American Missionaries In The Republic Of China (1912-1949), Matthew Joseph Douthitt Oct 2016

Finding Chinese Jesus: Chinese Christians And American Missionaries In The Republic Of China (1912-1949), Matthew Joseph Douthitt

Theses and Dissertations

This thesis investigates the beliefs and practices of Chinese Christians and their American missionary counterparts in the Republic of China (1912-1949). Between the fall of the Qing Dynasty and the rise of the People's Republic, the Chinese people seriously reexamined politics, religion, and their relationship with the West. Many scholars claim that Chinese people could not completely understand and accept Christianity due to insurmountable cultural differences. I would argue religious misunderstanding did not befall our historical subjects the Chinese Christians; rather misunderstanding has plagued the modern scholar. Misunderstanding did not arise from a centuries old cultural mindset. Instead, Sino-Christianity ...


Imagine No Religion: How Modern Abstractions Hide Ancient Realities [Table Of Contents], Carlin A. Barton, Daniel Boyarin Aug 2016

Imagine No Religion: How Modern Abstractions Hide Ancient Realities [Table Of Contents], Carlin A. Barton, Daniel Boyarin

Religion

“A timely contribution to a growing and important conversation about the inadequacy of our common category ‘religion’ for the understanding of many practices, attitudes, emotions, and beliefs—especially of peoples in other times and contexts—that we usually classify as ‘religion.’” —Wayne A. Meeks, Yale University


From Holy To Hunted: The Early Modern Witch Trials As A Catholic Response To Female Mysticism, Gaia Cloutier Apr 2016

From Holy To Hunted: The Early Modern Witch Trials As A Catholic Response To Female Mysticism, Gaia Cloutier

Senior Theses and Projects

No abstract provided.


Religious Freedom And American History: Reasons To Thank God, Mark Caleb Smith Mar 2016

Religious Freedom And American History: Reasons To Thank God, Mark Caleb Smith

Mark Caleb Smith, Ph.D.

No abstract provided.


Durston, James Marion, 1920-2011 (Mss 571), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Mar 2016

Durston, James Marion, 1920-2011 (Mss 571), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 571. Letters of James M. “Brandy” Durston, a Bowling Green, Kentucky chiropractor and later a resident of Southaven, Mississippi, with copious reminiscences of people and places in Bowling Green. Includes material relating primarily to Durston’s church in Memphis, Tennessee.


Evangelicals And American Foreign Policy [Review], Lauren Frances Turek Mar 2016

Evangelicals And American Foreign Policy [Review], Lauren Frances Turek

Lauren Turek

In Evangelicals and American Foreign Policy, Mark Amstutz seeks to respond to the recent efflorescence of scholarly work on the role that American evangelical Christians have played in shaping international affairs in the 20th century. Written from an evangelical perspective, the book sets out to dispel what Amstutz terms “prevalent misconceptions” about the nature and underlying motivations for evangelical political participation and engagement abroad (5). He includes among these the dynamics of evangelical support for Israel as well as conventional periodization that locate the beginning of serious evangelical political involvement in the post-World War II era. The book is above ...


Religious Rhetoric And The Evolution Of George W. Bush's Political Philosophy, Lauren Frances Turek Mar 2016

Religious Rhetoric And The Evolution Of George W. Bush's Political Philosophy, Lauren Frances Turek

Lauren Turek

This essay surveys George W. Bush's public statements from 1993 to 2001 to examine the evolution of his religious and political rhetoric. Bush's personal religiosity and his use of religious rhetoric during his campaigns for the presidency and in his two terms in office have received extensive comment from the press as well as from scholars. Yet very little scholarly work has considered the role of religion in his earlier political career. Although Bush had evinced a deep and genuine evangelical faith for years before he launched his bid for the governorship, he did not begin his political ...


Helm, Margie May, 1894-1991 (Mss 552), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Feb 2016

Helm, Margie May, 1894-1991 (Mss 552), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Manuscripts Collection 552. Personal and professional correspondence and papers of Margie Helm, Auburn, Kentucky native and longtime Western Kentucky University head librarian. Includes ancestral and family correspondence and papers, photographs, and genealogical research on the Helm, Carson, Porter, Blakey and related families.


Radicals In The Revolution: The Persecution Of Christians During The Revolutionary War, Kevan D. Keane Jan 2016

Radicals In The Revolution: The Persecution Of Christians During The Revolutionary War, Kevan D. Keane

Fidei et Veritatis: The Liberty University Journal of Graduate Research

This paper explores the plight of radical Christians in Pennsylvania during the American Revolution. Pennsylvania, up until the American Revolution, was governed by Quakers, and home to people of many denominational backgrounds, including various Anabaptist sects, such as the Amish, Mennonites, and Brethren. Both Quakers and Anabaptists adhered to the most conservative interpretation of Jesus’s teachings on not resisting an evil person (Matthew 5:38-42) and the swearing of oaths (Matthew 5:33-37). When Protestant revolutionaries took over the Pennsylvania government during the War, they required all residents of Pennsylvania to take an oath of allegiance to the Colony ...


The Irish Theology: Formation Of Celtic Christianity In Ireland (5th To 9th Century), Emma M. Foster Jan 2016

The Irish Theology: Formation Of Celtic Christianity In Ireland (5th To 9th Century), Emma M. Foster

Student Theses, Papers and Projects (History)

The conversion process of Ireland resulted in a culture that reflected both its pagan, Celtic roots and the new Christian ontology. From the fifth to ninth century, Ireland’s learned elite began to be converted to Christianity and created the early monastic settlements that shaped how Christianity was introduced. The interactions between the early Irish monastic founders and the pre-Christian Irish influenced the ways in which early monasteries were established and why Christianity was introduced the way it was. By establishing the Christian faith on the basis of Irish learning, the early church worked with the learned men to establish ...


Women And Religion In Nigeria, Fatai A. Olasupo Jan 2016

Women And Religion In Nigeria, Fatai A. Olasupo

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


(Dis)Owning Constantinian Christianity, Peter Iver Kaufman Jan 2016

(Dis)Owning Constantinian Christianity, Peter Iver Kaufman

Jepson School of Leadership Studies articles, book chapters and other publications

From 1970 until he took leave of the terrestrial city over forty years later, Robert Markus informed and enlivened our discussions of Constantinian Christianity. His impressive erudition still does. He was especially and insightfully concerned with the period “during which Christian Romans came slowly to identify themselves with traditional Roman values, culture, practices, and established institutions.” And he identified the world in which that assimilation “slowly” occurred as “the secular.” His readers were used to that assimilation in their time--our time--having heard references to civil religion, so Markus could well have been considered to be politically correct, and a number ...