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Ascetic Behavior And Color-Ful Language: Stories About Ethiopian Moses, Vincent L. Wimbush Jan 1992

Ascetic Behavior And Color-Ful Language: Stories About Ethiopian Moses, Vincent L. Wimbush

CGU Faculty Publications and Research

The characterization of the fouth-century Black (Ethiopian) monk named Moses in late ancient Christian hagiographie narratives opens wide a window not only onto particular understandings of, and propaganda about, ascetic piety and religious orientations to the world, but also ancient (non-black) Christian sensitivies to racial/color differences. Four ancient sources— Palladius' Lausiac History, Sozomen's Ecclesiastical History, the anonymous Apophthegmata Patrum, and Acta Sanctorum—are analyzed on the basis of a recent translation.


"The World Creeps In": Hiram Bingham Iii And The Decline In Missionary Fervor, Char Miller Jan 1981

"The World Creeps In": Hiram Bingham Iii And The Decline In Missionary Fervor, Char Miller

Pomona Faculty Publications and Research

To understand how and why Hiram Bingham III altered the course of his family's historical commitment to missionary service, one must recognize, as he later would, that the world in which he was raised was unlike that of his father, Hiram Bingham, Jr. The father had wanted his son to carry on in the family's service to God, but the roadblocks to the senior Bingham's desires to mold his son in his own image were numerous and interrelated: the family environment into which the child was born, the interaction of that nucleus with the larger community of ...


The Making Of A Missionary: Hiram Bingham's Odyssey, Char Miller Jan 1979

The Making Of A Missionary: Hiram Bingham's Odyssey, Char Miller

Pomona Faculty Publications and Research

Throughout his twenty year tenure as minister of the mission church in Honolulu, Hiram Bingham earned hostile testimonials. Foreign residents and foreign visitors were virtually unanimous in their dislike for the meddlesome missionary. American visitors were appalled by Bingham's influence and actions: W.S. Ruschenberger, for instance, believed a "refined and elegant" missionary was more suitable than a "strong preacher." Similar sentiments were expressed by some of Bingham's colleagues. Asa Thurston complained that his co-worker was "too much disposed to take precedence of [me]"; later missionaries to Hawaii felt that Bingham assumed too much in the governance of ...