Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Replacing The Patient: The Fiction Of Prosthetics In Medical Practice, Laura L. Behling Mar 2005

Replacing The Patient: The Fiction Of Prosthetics In Medical Practice, Laura L. Behling

Scholarship and Professional Work of the Associate Provosts

The invention of computer simulations used for practicing surgical maneuvers in a video game-like format has an ancestry in the artificial limbs of history and is reflected, grotesquely, in Edgar Allan Poe's short story, "The Man That Was Used Up ". The nineteenth century worked to ensure that the incomplete body did indeed retain a sense of self by creating prostheses to mimic corporeal wholeness. Our present-day technology seems intent on doing precisely the opposite, deliberately fragmenting the body and challenging our understanding of the body and the prosthetic.


Why Are Liberal Education's Friends Of So Little Help?, Marshall W. Gregory Jan 2005

Why Are Liberal Education's Friends Of So Little Help?, Marshall W. Gregory

Scholarship and Professional Work - LAS

Emphasizes the need for college teachers to apply diligence in improving teaching methods towards the achievement of liberal education goals. Potential for teachers to advance knowledge and awareness on liberal education; Factors that can be attributed to the failure of colleges and universities in the U.S. to make progress in their liberal programs and aims; Ways to address liberal education issues.


Hogging The Limelight: The Queen's Wake And The Rise Of Celebrity Authorship, Jason N. Goldsmith Jan 2005

Hogging The Limelight: The Queen's Wake And The Rise Of Celebrity Authorship, Jason N. Goldsmith

Scholarship and Professional Work - LAS

In the following essay, Goldsmith argues that The Queen's Wake is commentary on the literary name branding inaugurated by the periodical culture of Hogg's day. For Goldsmith, the "crisis of reception" staged in the poem--sixteenth-century provincial bards in a first encounter with royal spectacle--is not unlike the uneasy celebrity Hogg experienced as the Ettrick Shepherd of Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine.


"I Knew There Was Something Wrong With That Paper": Scientific Rhetorical Styles And Scientific Misunderstandings, Carol Reeves Jan 2005

"I Knew There Was Something Wrong With That Paper": Scientific Rhetorical Styles And Scientific Misunderstandings, Carol Reeves

Scholarship and Professional Work - LAS

This selection unpacks scientific prose and claim substantiation for Nobel Prize winner, Stan Prusiner, in the transmissible spongiform encephlopathies field (i.e., mad cow disease). Applying linguistic strategies such as M. A. K. Halliday's "favorite clause type," the author examines argumentative strategies in dense scientific prose both in bold and cautious rhetorical styles and invented lexical changes in new scientific development.