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2005

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Series

University of Wollongong

Benang

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Kim Scott's Benang: Monstrous (Textual) Bodies, Lisa Slater Jan 2005

Kim Scott's Benang: Monstrous (Textual) Bodies, Lisa Slater

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

In Kim Scott’s Benang, bodies in excess of, or incompatible with, assimilationist and eugenicist discourse, narrate and make sense of their world. Scott has composed a novel that opens up a space to affirm and re-articulate subjectivities, and hence challenge the fantasy of a uniform civic body. Although he is the body who mediates the plurality of stories, his voice does not synthesise heterogeneous stories into a unified and coherent whole. Instead, Harley’s narrative— like his performance— creates a meeting place where diverse and multifarious stories are articulated. Scot t introduces the reader to Harley as a hybrid ...


Kim Scott's Benang: An Ethics Of Uncertainty, Lisa Slater Jan 2005

Kim Scott's Benang: An Ethics Of Uncertainty, Lisa Slater

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

The narrator, Harley, of Kim Scott’s novel Benang, suggests that he is writing “the most local of histories” (10). However, he also questions what it is that he is writing—“What was it? A family history? A local history? An experiment? A fantasy?” (33). Furthermore, throughout the novel, Harley worries that his “little history” might be resuscitating racist discourse. The questions that Harley raises regarding what it is he is writing parallel Scott’s concerns with problems of style, genre and frame. The colonial ideology of assimilation was disseminated through writing, which informed non-Indigenous people’s knowledge of and ...