Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Critical Visual Literacy: Multimodal Communication Across The Curriculum, Barbara J. Blakely Duffelmeyer, Anthony Ellertson Dec 2005

Critical Visual Literacy: Multimodal Communication Across The Curriculum, Barbara J. Blakely Duffelmeyer, Anthony Ellertson

English Publications

"Critical Visual Literacy: Multimodal Communication Across the Curriculum" makes the case for expanding the pedagogical space and communication possibilities in undergraduate communication-intensive and linked (learning community) courses by allowing students to create multimodal texts that deal with civic and cultural and/or discipline-specific themes. We argue that, rather than diluting the opportunities for rhetorical education—now comprised of critical literacy, visual literacy, and critical technological literacy in today's increasingly fast-moving visual and electronic cultural environment—multimodal composing more meaningfully reflects the environment in which students receive and generate text today. Using a theory base that draws from the literatures ...


Latino Studies And Information Literacy Competencies, Susan A. Vega Garcia Jun 2005

Latino Studies And Information Literacy Competencies, Susan A. Vega Garcia

Reference and Instruction Conference Papers, Posters and Presentations

No abstract provided.


Historical Development And Applications Of The Epic And Apex Models, Philip W. Gassman, Jimmy R. Williams, Verel W. Benson, R. César Izaurralde, Larry M. Hauck, C. Allan Jones, Jay Atwood, James R. Kiniry, Joan D. Flowers Jun 2005

Historical Development And Applications Of The Epic And Apex Models, Philip W. Gassman, Jimmy R. Williams, Verel W. Benson, R. César Izaurralde, Larry M. Hauck, C. Allan Jones, Jay Atwood, James R. Kiniry, Joan D. Flowers

CARD Working Papers

The development of the field-scale Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator (EPIC) model was initiated in 1981 to support assessments of soil erosion impacts on soil productivity for soil, climate, and cropping conditions representative of a broad spectrum of U.S. agricultural production regions. The first major application of EPIC was a national analysis performed in support of the 1985 Resources Conservation Act (RCA) assessment. The model has continuously evolved since that time and has been applied for a wide range of field, regional, and national studies both in the U.S. and in other countries. The range of EPIC applications has ...


Beyond Rigidity: The Unfinished Semantic Agenda Of Naming And Necessity, By Scott Soames, Heimir Geirsson May 2005

Beyond Rigidity: The Unfinished Semantic Agenda Of Naming And Necessity, By Scott Soames, Heimir Geirsson

Philosophy and Religious Studies Publications

n Naming and Necessity Saul Kripke criticized descriptivist theories of proper names and suggested a ‘better picture’ as a replacement. But while the ‘better picture’ that Kripke provided was very interesting and stimulating, it was little more than a sketch of a theory that needed much work and refinement. While Kripke argued that proper names are not synonymous with definite descriptions or clusters of definite descriptions, he was silent on what the semantic contents of names might be. Further, he even speculated in the introduction to his book that the apparatus of propositions might break down given his arguments, thus ...


The Historical And Materialist Subtext Of The Battle Of The Sheep, Chad M. Gasta Jan 2005

The Historical And Materialist Subtext Of The Battle Of The Sheep, Chad M. Gasta

World Languages and Cultures Publications

In his perceptive work on the interrelationship between history and literature, Louis Montrose advocates a resituation of texts within their contexts which leads to "a reciprocal concern with the historicity of texts and the textuality of history" (20). For Montrose, aesthetic works can historicize the past and provide an understanding and explanation of times past, even though they cannot provide an objective portrayal of history (20). It is in this spirit that i would like to approach the Battle of the Sheep in Don Quijote. To resituate this well-known episode within its socio-historical context is to make possible a more ...


Book Review: Espana Connection By Luis Gomez Arrojo, Chad M. Gasta Jan 2005

Book Review: Espana Connection By Luis Gomez Arrojo, Chad M. Gasta

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Espana connection is a series of in-depth articles on organized crime in Spain written by Luis Gomez, a former editor of El Pais where he is presently an investigative reporter. On the best-seller list in Spain at one time, the book brings to light the growing criminal and drug culture in Spain by centering each chapter on a particular criminal activity, citing official police reports, using eyewitness testimony by field investigators as well as national and international statistics by Interpol, Europol, and the Spanish Guardia Civil, among other official bodies. Gomez then reminds readers about well-known-some might even say infamous-cases ...


The Public Sphere And The Norms Of Transactional Argument, Jean Goodwin Jan 2005

The Public Sphere And The Norms Of Transactional Argument, Jean Goodwin

English Publications

An outsider to argument theory, should she look through the rich outpouring of our recent work, might be amused to find us theorists not following our own prescriptions. We propound our ideas, but we don't always interact with each other--we don't argue. The essays by William Rehg and Robert Asen make promising start on rectifying this difficulty. I want to discuss them, first, to show how they acknowledge in exemplary fashion a pair of challenges I think we should all be addressing; and next to consider their specific responses.


What Does Arguing Look Like?, Jean Goodwin Jan 2005

What Does Arguing Look Like?, Jean Goodwin

English Publications

Even on our best days, we teachers of argumentation sometimes suspect that our students are thinking bad things about us: that they don't like our subject! In this essay, I will give an account of a classroom exercise I call "What Does Arguing Look Like?" aimed to elicit and confront this suspected negative view of arguing. I'll start by pointing out why we need to know what our students are thinking. I'll then describe the exercise as I used it in one class, and analyze in detail the results it produced. And I'll close with some ...