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Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2005

Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

Boston Road

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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Gregg, Earnest, Gregg, Earnest. Bronx African American History Project Jul 2005

Gregg, Earnest, Gregg, Earnest. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Ernest Greg’s family moved from the South, to Atlantic City, to the Bronx in the 1930’s. The family came to the Morrisania section of the Bronx because Greg’s father was a Pullman porter. The family lived in a five-story walk-up until Ernest was about 12 on 169th street. He remembers his block as being predominately black, but Park Avenue, which was close by, as being ethnically diverse. He also remembers feeling very safe in that neighborhood. All of the adults looked out for the children.

When he was 12, the family moved to the newly opened Castle ...


Roberts, Talibah, Roberts, Talibah. Interview: Bronx African American History Project Mar 2005

Roberts, Talibah, Roberts, Talibah. Interview: Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Talibah Roberts was born in 1966 and grew up on Crotona Park East in the Bronx. Her father was African-American and her mother was born in Puerto Rico. Growing up Talibah identified herself more as a Puerto Rican because she was primarily raised by her mother, although her father lived nearby and was involved in her life as well. Her mother moved to Crotona Park East in 1965 right around the time of the November 1965 blackouts in that neighborhood. Her parents both worked as a sort of informal catering business for the community to bring in some extra income ...


Goodwin, Welvin, Goodwin, Welvin. Bronx African American History Project Feb 2005

Goodwin, Welvin, Goodwin, Welvin. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Welvin Goodwin was born January 7, 1908 in Tipson, Texas. Both of his parents were Farmers. His father was born in England. When he was younger then 10, he too started working on the farm. He came from a very large family, of which he and his sister were the only family members remaining when the interview was conducted. His mother used to babysit white children and Weldin would play with them and claims to have known nothing of discrimination.

Welvin enjoyed playing baseball when he was young and was in Negro Leagues. His father started him with baseball and ...