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Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2005

Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

Latino/Latin American Studies Reports

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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Examining The Impact Of Parental Involvement In A Dual Language Program: Implications For Children And Schools - Ollas Report No. 2, J. F. Casas Aug 2005

Examining The Impact Of Parental Involvement In A Dual Language Program: Implications For Children And Schools - Ollas Report No. 2, J. F. Casas

Latino/Latin American Studies Reports

This study focuses on a dual language (Spanish-English) program in the Omaha Public Schools. Dual language programs are programs in which children develop proficiency in two languages simultaneously. These programs are currently seen as the gold standard second language education because of the large amount of empirical support they have received with respect to children’s academic gains. All of the dual language classrooms are comprised of half native English speakers and half Spanish speakers.

Parental involvement has received much empirical attention with respect to traditional school programs; however, little is known about the role of parental involvement in dual ...


Educational Achievement And The Successful Integration Of Latinos In Nebraska: A Statistical Profile To Inform Policies And Programs - Ollas Report No. 1, Lourdes Gouveia, Mary Ann Powell Mar 2005

Educational Achievement And The Successful Integration Of Latinos In Nebraska: A Statistical Profile To Inform Policies And Programs - Ollas Report No. 1, Lourdes Gouveia, Mary Ann Powell

Latino/Latin American Studies Reports

The unprecedented and continuous growth of the Latino population in Nebraka compels us to engage in institutional changes, comprehensive policy reforms, and innovative programs that enhance the productive integration of this population into our state. As an abundant body of research and informed practices make clear, education is the bedrock of successful integration for current and future generations of Latinos. No longer can a job, obtained without a high school or college education, provide the opportunities it may have once provided to older generations of Americans or, for that matter, first-generation immigrants. The latter tend to measure their socioeconomic success ...