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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Latino Studies And Information Literacy Competencies, Susan A. Vega Garcia Jun 2005

Latino Studies And Information Literacy Competencies, Susan A. Vega Garcia

Reference and Instruction Conference Papers, Posters and Presentations

No abstract provided.


Artful Identifications: Crafting Survival In Japanese American Concentration Camps, Jane E. Dusselier Jan 2005

Artful Identifications: Crafting Survival In Japanese American Concentration Camps, Jane E. Dusselier

Jane E. Dusselier

"Artful Identifications" offers three meanings of internment art. First, internees remade locations of imprisonment into livable places of survival. Inside places were remade as internees responded to degraded living conditions by creating furniture with discarded apple crates, cardboard, tree branches and stumps, scrap pieces of wood left behind by government carpenters, and wood lifted from guarded lumber piles. Having addressed the material conditions of their living units, internees turned their attention to aesthetic matters by creating needle crafts, wood carvings, ikebana, paintings, shell art, and kobu. Dramatic changes to outside spaces of "assembly centers" and concentration camps were also critical ...


Homegirls In The Public Sphere By Miranda, Marie (Keta) Review By: Yost, Bambi, Bambi L. Yost Jan 2005

Homegirls In The Public Sphere By Miranda, Marie (Keta) Review By: Yost, Bambi, Bambi L. Yost

Bambi L Yost

Abstrat is not available. Citation: Homegirls in the Public Sphere by Miranda, Marie (Keta) Review by: Yost, Bambi Children, Youth and Environments Vol. 15, No. 1, Environmental Health, and Other Papers (2005) , pp. 406-413 Published by: The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado, a body corporate, for the benefit of the Children, Youth and Environments Center at the University of Colorado Boulder Stable URL: http://0-www.jstor.org.library.simmons.edu/stable/10.7721/chilyoutenvi.15.1.0406


The Historical And Materialist Subtext Of The Battle Of The Sheep, Chad M. Gasta Jan 2005

The Historical And Materialist Subtext Of The Battle Of The Sheep, Chad M. Gasta

World Languages and Cultures Publications

In his perceptive work on the interrelationship between history and literature, Louis Montrose advocates a resituation of texts within their contexts which leads to "a reciprocal concern with the historicity of texts and the textuality of history" (20). For Montrose, aesthetic works can historicize the past and provide an understanding and explanation of times past, even though they cannot provide an objective portrayal of history (20). It is in this spirit that i would like to approach the Battle of the Sheep in Don Quijote. To resituate this well-known episode within its socio-historical context is to make possible a more ...


Rethinking Native Learning Environments, Bob Mohr, Brodie Bain, Lynn Paxson Jan 2005

Rethinking Native Learning Environments, Bob Mohr, Brodie Bain, Lynn Paxson

Architecture Conference Proceedings and Presentations

This symposium will present three projects and three explorations into creating learning environments for Native communities. The projects range from a high school that· drew Native students from many tribal nations across the country, to a tribal (2-year) college that serves primarily one Native nation but is open to students from tribes from around the Pacific Northwest, to one of the oldest tribal universities ( 4-year) in the country which serves students from multiple Native nations. All three of these institutions have dealt in different ways with the idea of helping their students "walk in two worlds" or function in two ...


Exploring Diverse Land Ethics, Joseph B. Juhasz, Lynn Paxson, Rubén Martinez Jan 2005

Exploring Diverse Land Ethics, Joseph B. Juhasz, Lynn Paxson, Rubén Martinez

Architecture Conference Proceedings and Presentations

Different cultures do not share the same relationship( s) with the land, the natural environment, and the cosmos. For some cultures in fact these three labels are all synonymous, while for others clear distinctions are understood through their use/invocation. In addition the role or relationship ofhumans with the land, the natural environment, and the cosmos varies among different groups and cultures. These multiple value systems and epistemologies have shaped cultures and impacted the relations between these many groups. Some might argue that these differences, or this diversity is one of the major reasons that different cultures in contact often ...