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2005

Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

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Articles 1 - 30 of 259

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Fly Away: The Great African American Cultural Migrations, Will Scott, Peter Rutkoff Aug 2015

Fly Away: The Great African American Cultural Migrations, Will Scott, Peter Rutkoff

Peter Rutkoff

No abstract provided.


Indefinite Ethnicity In Fact And Fiction: "Invisible Color" Or "Honkified Meanderings"?, Anita Louise Hughes Dec 2005

Indefinite Ethnicity In Fact And Fiction: "Invisible Color" Or "Honkified Meanderings"?, Anita Louise Hughes

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Passing, both standard and reverse, is the process of changing ethnicity. The methodology of reverse passing varies, but claiming "no color" is ineffective in fact and fiction as can be seen in James McBride's The Color of Water, Shirlee Taylor Haizlip's The Sweeter the Juice, Danzy Senna's Caucasia, and Rosellen Brown's Half a Heart. The characters in these texts attempt indefinite ethnicity by denying color and are prone to restlessness and failure until they accept racial duality.


Brown Vs. Board Of Education 50 Years Later: , Joseph L. White Dec 2005

Brown Vs. Board Of Education 50 Years Later: , Joseph L. White

Conference Proceedings and Session Abstracts

No abstract provided.


Jenkins, Arthur, Jenkins, Arthur. Bronx African American History Project Dec 2005

Jenkins, Arthur, Jenkins, Arthur. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Interviewee: Arthur Jenkins

Interviewer: Dr. Mark Naison, Maxine Gordon, Dr. Brian Purnell

Summarized by Alice Stryker

Arthur Jenkins is a musician who grew up in the Morrisania section of the Bronx. His mother’s side of the family moved to New York City from Houston, Texas. His grandmother had moved the family to Harlem, where his mother met his father. When Jenkins was born, his family was living in Harlem and shortly thereafter moved to the Bronx. His father worked as a garment presser and worked for a tailor.

He first began playing in bands when he was attending Junior ...


Ua12/2/1 College Heights Herald, Vol. 81, No. 23, Wku Student Affairs Dec 2005

Ua12/2/1 College Heights Herald, Vol. 81, No. 23, Wku Student Affairs

WKU Archives Records

WKU campus newspaper reporting campus, athletic and Bowling Green, Kentucky news. Articles in this issue:

  • Leslie, Joey. More Students Tested During AIDS Day
  • Hupman, Samantha. J-term More Popular than Anticipated
  • Fontana, Alex. Student Government Association Proposes New Bicycles for Police
  • Bosken, Nina. Students Dodge, Duck, Dive for Charity and Prizes – Special Olympics
  • Richardson, Kelly. Kentucky Community Technical College System Requests Funding – KCTCS
  • Taking the Next Step – Cultural Diversity
  • Eoff, Allison. Pass on Adderall
  • Gabler, R. XXX Ads Disappointing
  • Williams, Suzanne. A Woman’s Heart
  • Hupman, Samantha. Two Fights Reported on Hill
  • Paul, Corey. Kwanzaa to Be Celebrated Today
  • Green, Tavia ...


Beckford, Hugh, Beckford, Hugh. Bronx African American History Project Dec 2005

Beckford, Hugh, Beckford, Hugh. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

INTERVIEWER: Natasha Lightfoot

INTERVIEWEE: Hugh Beckford

SUMMARY BY: Patrick O’Donnell

Hugh Beckford is the director of Caribbean American Family Services, an organization that he established in 1991. He is a 1985 graduate of Fordham College, Rose Hill, where he studied theology and sociology. Beckford was born in Trelawney, Jamaica, and was raised by his grandparents because his parents divorced when he was young. He was locally educated in Jamaican public schools and attended St. George’s College in Kingston, a boarding school. As a young man he was considered one of the best dancers in Jamaica and occasionally appeared ...


Hispanic Political Power: A Case Study Of Southwest Michigan, Jason Mark Glatz Dec 2005

Hispanic Political Power: A Case Study Of Southwest Michigan, Jason Mark Glatz

Master's Theses

This thesis examines the relationship between rising Hispanic immigration and its influence on voting patterns. It examines thirteen Southwestern Michigan counties and compares averaged Republican voting percentages from past elections for the U.S. House of Representatives with the 2000 election. Previous research has established that Hispanics, with the exception of Cubans, predominantly vote for Democratic candidates. If this relationship is true for Southwest Michigan, areas with increasing Hispanic populations should display diminishing Republican voting percentages.

A normal Republican vote was computed for 284 minor civil divisions from the period immediately preceding significant Hispanic immigration and was compared to the ...


The Black Body As Souvenir In American Lynching, Harvey Young Nov 2005

The Black Body As Souvenir In American Lynching, Harvey Young

Harvey Young

This essay reads the collection of body parts, in the aftermath of the lynching spectacle, as souvenirs, fetish objects, and performance remains. Along the way, it spotlights the importance of narrative to the souvenir, challenges the notion that performance disappears through an emphasis on its remains, and asserts that embodied experiences of the past can be accessed in the present.


Haitian Creole, Marc E. Prou Nov 2005

Haitian Creole, Marc E. Prou

Marc E. Prou

Haitian Creole, also known as Kreyòl, is a member of the French-based creole language groups with a considerable part of its lexicon coming directly from seventeenth century French. Its grammar differs from French, however, and reflects closely the West African languages, such as Ewe, Fon, Yoruba, and Ibo. Kreyòl is similar to the creoles spoken in the French overseas departments of Martinique and Guadeloupe, as well as in Dominica, Saint Lucia, and parts of Trinidad.


Orange, Taur, Orange, Taur. Interview: Bronx African American History Project Nov 2005

Orange, Taur, Orange, Taur. Interview: Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Taur Orange grew up in the Bronxdale Houses which they were able to live in because his father served in WWII and these houses were designated to veterans. This housing complex opened in the early 1950’s and consisted of mostly two parent households. Her father worked for the New York Transit Authority, and after she turned 6, her mother worked as an assistant teacher, or paraprofessional as they were called. He describes the houses as having lots of trees and grass surrounding the building, which were very well kept. The ethnic makeup of the houses was very diverse. For ...


Murray, Elizabeth, Murray, Elizabeth. Interview: Bronx African American History Project Nov 2005

Murray, Elizabeth, Murray, Elizabeth. Interview: Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Her family moved from Harlem in 1941. Her father was a Transit Worker in the Subway Division and her mother was a seamstress from their home. They moved into a 3 family house on Home Street. Growing up there was a rich street life. She saw the racial makeup of her street change from mostly German and Jewish to mostly African American. She attended PS 63 and really enjoyed herself there. The school was pretty diverse. Her family attended Caldwell AME Zion Church. This was a powerful force in her life and in the community. Even though she lived in ...


Walters, Delores, Walters, Delores. Interview: Bronx African American History Project Nov 2005

Walters, Delores, Walters, Delores. Interview: Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Delores Walters was born in Lincoln hospital and lived in Rogers Place in the Bronx for nine years. Her parents grew up in Harlem and moved from there sometime in the 1940’s. Delores fondly recalls the block in the neighborhood and the street atmosphere on Rogers Place; she remembers being very active, with a lot of playmates. The community was predominantly Black, and the building she lived in was run by a Caribbean family whom she remembers doing a great job of keeping the building up. Although Delores does remember there being bullies, she never had difficulty with them ...


Politics And Prayer In West Perrine, Florida : Civic Social Capital And The Black Church, Susan Oltman Fink Nov 2005

Politics And Prayer In West Perrine, Florida : Civic Social Capital And The Black Church, Susan Oltman Fink

FIU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This thesis traces the mechanisms and sources responsible for the generation of civic social capital (a set of shared norms and values that promote cooperation between groups, enabling them to participate in the political process) by black churches in West Perrine, Florida. Data for this thesis includes over fifty interviews and participant observations, archival records, newspaper articles, and scholarly journals.

Despite the institutional racism of the first half of the twentieth century, many blacks and whites in Perrine developed levels of trust significant enough to form an integrated local governing body, evidence of high levels of csc. At mid-century, when ...


College Latino Students: Cultural Integration, Retention, And Successful Completion, Robert Hernandez Nov 2005

College Latino Students: Cultural Integration, Retention, And Successful Completion, Robert Hernandez

Staff Publications & Research

The purpose of this study was to examine and gain a deeper understanding of Latino College students' sub-cultures and how their cultural integration can affect their retention and completion of a baccalaureate degree. Also, this study sought to understand the cultural factors that influenced student retention. The participants were given a survey to complete for demographic information, and then were interviewed to capture each of their stories and experiences.

Twenty participants were involved in the study. All of the participants were self-identified as Latinos and came from several different, four-year, residential universities. There were nine men and eleven women. Of ...


Himmelstein, Paul, Himmelstein, Paul. Bronx African American History Project Nov 2005

Himmelstein, Paul, Himmelstein, Paul. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Interviewee: Paul Himmelstein

Interviewers: Mark Naison and Brian Purnell

Summarized by Alice Stryker

Paul Himmelstein is one of 14 children and grew up on Prospect and Jennings Avenue. His father worked 7 days a week, as a truck driver during the week and a cab driver on the weekends. Both of his parents are Jewish and speak Yiddish.

The neighborhood was predominately black when he was 5. Before that, however, it was mostly Jewish. He speaks of the Jewish Delis and markets that he and his family used to go to on the weekends that were very close by. The ...


Cannon, Paul--Jerald Williams And Woodrow Johnson, Cannon, Paul--Jerald Williams And Woodrow Johnson. Bronx African American History Project Nov 2005

Cannon, Paul--Jerald Williams And Woodrow Johnson, Cannon, Paul--Jerald Williams And Woodrow Johnson. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Interviewer: Mark Naison, Brian Purnell

Interviewee: Paul Cannon, Woody Johnson, Gerald Williams

Date: 11/10/05

Summarized by Salmaan Khan on 4/14/07

Gerald Williams was born in Newport News, Virginia. He moved to the Morrisania section of the Bronx with his mother with the intention of working and moving back. Gerald attempted to earn some money by working a job at the Hotel Diplomat on 43rd street in order to go to Canada to play in the International Table Tennis Tournament. They chose to move to the Bronx because of friends his mother had in the Bronx ...


Blakeney, James, Blakeney, James. Bronx African American History Project Nov 2005

Blakeney, James, Blakeney, James. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

James Blakeney is a long time Bronx resident who grew up in the Patterson Housing Projects. His parents were sharecroppers from North and South Carolina. Neither of his parents received an education beyond the 6th or 8th grade. His father fought in World War II and then returned to the states to live in Queens, where James lived for three years, before moving to the Patterson Houses. His father worked at the mess hall of St. Albans Neighborhood Hospital and left the family, as many fathers were beginning to do, when James was ten years old. Mrs. Blakeney ...


Kogolo, Raymond, Jr., Kogolo, Raymond, Jr. Bronx African American History Project Nov 2005

Kogolo, Raymond, Jr., Kogolo, Raymond, Jr. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Interviewee: Raymond Kogolo Jr.

Interviewers: Ogonetojoh Okoh, Brian Purnell

Summarized By: Eddie Mikus

Raymond Kogolo Jr. is a Bronx resident who came to the borough from Lagos, Nigeria, in order to attend Fordham University. In his interview, he discussed his experience at a Nigerian boarding school as well as his life in the Bronx as a Nigerian immigrant.

As a child, Kogolo’s mother came to the Bronx due to her job as an airline pilot and split the family’s time between the borough and Nigeria. Kogolo said that many of the children he played in the Bronx were ...


Mercado, Albert, Mercado, Albert. Interview: Bronx African American History Project Nov 2005

Mercado, Albert, Mercado, Albert. Interview: Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

When he was young in the Bronx he says it was a lovely area. There was a good mix of groups, but “everyone got along.” After junior high, he attended Art and Design in Manhattan, but he experienced prejudice there Latinos or African-Americans were in the minority there, so he transferred to Manhattan Vocational Tech. He stayed there a year but left because there was a lot of gang activity. He then attended DeWitt Clinton. He lived in the Bronx and the area had become very dilapidated - “it looked like if someone ran through there and just bombed it up ...


Cruz, Marilyn, Cruz, Marilyn. Bronx African American History Project Nov 2005

Cruz, Marilyn, Cruz, Marilyn. Bronx African American History Project

Oral Histories

Interviewee: Marilyn Cruz

Interviewer: Dr. Mark Naison, Princess Okieme, Andrew Tiedt

Date of Interview Novermber 3, 2005

Summarized by Alice Stryker

Marilyn was born in Harlem. Her mother’s family immigrated to Harlem from Barbados and her father’s family was from the south. She grew up attending St. Ambrosse church, which was attended by many people from the Caribbean. While in Harlem, she attended PS 113 for grade school and remembers playing in Central Park.

The Basian side of her family was very mixed. She believes her great-grandfather may have been white, but she is unsure. The family really ...


Keepin’ It Real: The Life And Times Of A Black Student Affairs Professional, John Leonard Harris Nov 2005

Keepin’ It Real: The Life And Times Of A Black Student Affairs Professional, John Leonard Harris

10th Annual National Conference (2005): Different Perspectives on Majority Rules

The purpose of this workshop is to encourage and help those currently serving in or seeking positions in university positions. The presenter, who served as the Special Assistant to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln for nearly eight years, will facilitate an open discussion based on what he learned in this position. The overall goal of this workshop is to provide the knowledge that will enable any professional at a predominantly white institution to succeed in spite of the opposition, obstacles and oppression.


Leaving Them Hanging: Why Predominantly White Institutions Fail To Retain Minority Students, John Leonard Harris Nov 2005

Leaving Them Hanging: Why Predominantly White Institutions Fail To Retain Minority Students, John Leonard Harris

10th Annual National Conference (2005): Different Perspectives on Majority Rules

The purpose of this workshop is to help those professionals who work with and for minority college students. This workshop will examine: 1) institutional recruitment strategies; 2) campus climate and similar issues; 3) problems associated with retaining minority students; 4) the campus community and 5) keys to retaining minority students.


Maximizing The Potential Of Black Greek-Letter Organizations: Getting Back To The Basics, John Leonard Harris Nov 2005

Maximizing The Potential Of Black Greek-Letter Organizations: Getting Back To The Basics, John Leonard Harris

10th Annual National Conference (2005): Different Perspectives on Majority Rules

This workshop examines: 1) the history behind the origin of Black Greek-letter organizations; 2) their special role on campus and in the community; 3) the reasons why people join and myths about membership; 4) current concerns and problems; and 5) keys for getting back to the basics.


The Difficulties Inherent In Cultural Diversity: Overcoming The Reasons Why Most Diversity Efforts Fail, John Leonard Harris Nov 2005

The Difficulties Inherent In Cultural Diversity: Overcoming The Reasons Why Most Diversity Efforts Fail, John Leonard Harris

10th Annual National Conference (2005): Different Perspectives on Majority Rules

This presentation takes a hard look at the difficulties inherent in cultural diversity. These factors are often overlooked or disregarded with regard to diversity, leave well-meaning efforts short of their intended target. Workshop participants will consider a list of factors that are at work when most diversity efforts fail and attempt to develop solutions that will lead to progress.


Understanding The Effects Of Dominant Institution Acculturation On The Culture And Leadership Of Indigenous People, Based On A Study: “Exploring Indigenous Tribal Leadership.”, Jeff G. Hart Nov 2005

Understanding The Effects Of Dominant Institution Acculturation On The Culture And Leadership Of Indigenous People, Based On A Study: “Exploring Indigenous Tribal Leadership.”, Jeff G. Hart

10th Annual National Conference (2005): Different Perspectives on Majority Rules

What effect has forced acculturation had on Native American people? This presentation will present ideas on ethnocentrism, Manifest Destiny, and the issues between indigenous cultures and dominant institutions. Participants will be invited to ask questions and participate in a discussion about how strengthened partnerships between different cultures might help to bridge institutional gaps.


Academic Achievement Through Cultural Autonomy: Enhancing Higher Education Persistence For Culturally Traditional American Indians, Terry Huffman Nov 2005

Academic Achievement Through Cultural Autonomy: Enhancing Higher Education Persistence For Culturally Traditional American Indians, Terry Huffman

10th Annual National Conference (2005): Different Perspectives on Majority Rules

This session examines the contrasting experiences between groups of culturally traditional American Indian students and the college encounter. The session will discuss the practical implications emerging from the findings of a five-year research project. Policy and educational practice suggestions for making the predominantly non-Indian campus more accommodating for Native students will be explored.


A Model For Enhancing Retention Of Students Of Color: Living The Legacy, M. Colleen Jones Nov 2005

A Model For Enhancing Retention Of Students Of Color: Living The Legacy, M. Colleen Jones

10th Annual National Conference (2005): Different Perspectives on Majority Rules

Colleges and universities are very concerned and employ considerable resources toward the retention and academic success of all students; but for students of color, those objectives are particularly salient. The Melvin W. Jones Learning Community was established in 2003 (with the first class enrolling in 2004) through the initiative of the University of Nebraska – Lincoln’s African American Caucus to enhance the first-year experience and improve the retention of first generation students and students of color on the UNL campus. The learning community was originally conceived as an “urban” transition facilitator to help students from larger cities and smaller, rural ...


How We “Fit”: African-American Faculty At A Predominantly White Institution Of Higher Education: A Case Study Of A Small Liberal Arts College In Virginia, Loretta C. Jones Nov 2005

How We “Fit”: African-American Faculty At A Predominantly White Institution Of Higher Education: A Case Study Of A Small Liberal Arts College In Virginia, Loretta C. Jones

10th Annual National Conference (2005): Different Perspectives on Majority Rules

This session will address historical, sociological, and psychological perspectives that should lend insight into fostering the effective performance of culturally diverse individuals within a predominantly Euro-American institutional setting. Research-based implications will be shared through the lens of three African-American female professors within such a context.


How We “Fit”: African-American Faculty At A Predominantly White Institution Of Higher Education: A Case Study Of A Small Liberal Arts College In Virginia, Carolyn E. Gross Nov 2005

How We “Fit”: African-American Faculty At A Predominantly White Institution Of Higher Education: A Case Study Of A Small Liberal Arts College In Virginia, Carolyn E. Gross

10th Annual National Conference (2005): Different Perspectives on Majority Rules

This session will address historical, sociological, and psychological perspectives that should lend insight into fostering the effective performance of culturally diverse individuals within a predominantly Euro-American institutional setting. Research-based implications will be shared through the lens of three African-American female professors within such a context.


The Phenomenon Of Biculturalism And Stress Among Ethnic Minority Nurse Faculty, Sheila P. Davis Nov 2005

The Phenomenon Of Biculturalism And Stress Among Ethnic Minority Nurse Faculty, Sheila P. Davis

10th Annual National Conference (2005): Different Perspectives on Majority Rules

This is an interactive presentation of a husband and wife team in which results of a methodological triangulation study that compares and contrasts ethnic minority faculty at both predominantly white and predominately ethnic minority institutions on bicultural and occupational stress are discussed. The investigator-generated, Bicultural System’s Conceptual Model, is used to interpret results and derive strategies for achieving a climate more conducive to optimal engagement of all faculty. Seven themes emerge from this study: Appraising, Proving, Fitting-In, Defending, Distancing, Being Invisible, and Mentoring are discussed in light of coping strategies used by ethnic minorities in bicultural settings. Understanding these ...