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Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2005

Philosophy

Illinois Wesleyan University

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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Climbing Down The Ladder: Inwardness And Abstraction In Wittgenstein's Philosophy With Reference To Kierkegaard, Lisa Hoelle '05 Apr 2005

Climbing Down The Ladder: Inwardness And Abstraction In Wittgenstein's Philosophy With Reference To Kierkegaard, Lisa Hoelle '05

Honors Projects

Both Soren Kierkegaard and Ludwig Wittgenstein argued that there are some truths, located beyond the boundaries of rational understanding, which cannot be communicated directly to others. Wittgenstein was influenced by his reading of Kierkegaard's texts on these matters, and accordingly he, like Kierkegaard, has a place in his philosophy for the importance of inwardness in knowing paradoxical truths. A move of 'inwardness,' for Kierkegaard, is an action that requires a personal and absolute belief that can't be explained directly to others, while 'paradoxical truths', as Kierkegaard uses the phrase, refers to propositions that we regard as incomprehensible but ...


Hume's Objection To The Thomistic Doctrine On Suicide, Emily M. Kelahan '05 Apr 2005

Hume's Objection To The Thomistic Doctrine On Suicide, Emily M. Kelahan '05

Honors Projects

In "Of Suicide," David Hume argues against the dominant Thomistic doctrine on suicide. Thomas Aquinas, in Summa Theologica, I-IL Q64, Art 5, argues that suicide is morally impermissible because it violates three kinds of duties: one's duty to God, to others, and to oneself. Arguing from within the Thomistic framework, Hume exposes the inconsistencies of Aquinas's theory and refutes Aquinas's arguments against suicide. In this paper I look at only the arguments concerning the ways in which suicide violates a duty to God. My strategy is as follows. First, I argue that G.R. McLean's interpretation ...


Normative Failure In Blackburn's Ruling Passions, William R. Porter '05 Apr 2005

Normative Failure In Blackburn's Ruling Passions, William R. Porter '05

Honors Projects

In Ruling Passions, Simon Blackburn advances an ethical theory that welds his quasi-realism to a Humean-Smithean theory of moral sentiments. This paper concerns the latter Humean side of Blackburn's theory, specifically Blackburn's attempt to provide a normative ethical theory. This attempt largely involves getting over the tallest obstacle to any defender of Hume: the famous sensible knave problem.