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Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Ecstatic Morality And Sexual Politics: A Catholic And Antitotalitarian Theory Of The Body, Graham James Mcaleer May 2005

Ecstatic Morality And Sexual Politics: A Catholic And Antitotalitarian Theory Of The Body, Graham James Mcaleer

Religion

This first book-length treatment of Thomas Aquinas’s theory of the body presents a Catholic understanding of the body and its implications for social and political philosophy. Making a fundamental contribution to antitotalitarian theory, McAleer argues that a sexual politics reliant upon Aquinas’s theory of the body is better (because less violent) than other commonly available theories. He contrasts this theory with those of four other groups of thinkers: the continental tradition represented by Kant, Schopenhauer, Merleau-Ponty, Nancy, Levinas, and Deleuze; feminism, in the work of Donna Haraway; an alternative Catholic theory to be found in Karl Rahner; and ...


Divine Illusions, Alphonso Lingis Jan 2005

Divine Illusions, Alphonso Lingis

Research Resources

David Allison says to his readers that Nietzsche writes for you — you and him and me. In his book he tells of what of Nietzsche’s thoughts he has, with long years of research and penetrating and generous reflection, made his own. The lucidity of this book enables us to see if these thoughts can also become ours. Nietzsche’s thoughts are not only extremely complex but hard thoughts which we cannot make our own without a struggle. The finest virtue of a philosophical book on Nietzsche is that it provokes this struggle. Here I am only going to recount ...


Continental Philosophy In Britain And America, Babette Babich Jan 2005

Continental Philosophy In Britain And America, Babette Babich

Articles and Chapters in Academic Book Collections

Continental, or as it is sometimes called, contemporary European philosophy represents a range of approaches to academic philosophy distinguished from the analytic modality dominating professional or institutional philosophy in the United Kingdom and in the United States, as in Australia, Canada, and Ireland. Where the analytic tradition itself may be said to trace its own roots to Europe, e.g., positivism may be traced to France and its originator August Comte, and logical empiricism to Germany and to Austria and the writings of Gottlob Frege and Ludwig Wittgenstein and the members of the Vienna Circle, continental philosophy expresses an ideological ...


Mousike Techne: The Philosophical Practice Of Music In Plato, Nietzsche, And Heidegger, Babette Babich Jan 2005

Mousike Techne: The Philosophical Practice Of Music In Plato, Nietzsche, And Heidegger, Babette Babich

Articles and Chapters in Academic Book Collections

After retracing the breadth of the definition of music in antiquity to the end of justifying the sense in which one may speak of 'the music of philosophy' as Plato's Socrates does, this essay re-reads the Platonic distinction between philosophy as the highest kind of music and performative, as heard or played sung music as a lower form. It then turns to an exploration of Nietzsche's writing style conceived on a muscial model precisely qua aphoristic and concludes with a review of Heidegger's thought as musically composed or adumbrated.


Continental Philosophy In Britain And America, Babette Babich Jan 2005

Continental Philosophy In Britain And America, Babette Babich

Articles and Chapters in Academic Book Collections

list of chapter sections en lieu of an abstract

“Introduction” 22-28; “Phenomenology” 28- 34; “Hermeneutic Phenomenology” 34-40; “Existentialism: Toward an Ethics of Responsibility & a Feminist Erotic Ethic” 40-44; Hermeneutics: Gadamer and Ricoeur; Continental Aesthetics: Merleau-Ponty and the Phenomenology of Perception” 51-56; “Continental Philosophy of Science” 56-58; “The Hermeneutics of the Other: The Dominion of the Ethical” 58-64; “The Frankfurt School and Critical Theory” 64-67; “From Structuralism to Deconstruction” 67-82.