Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Dr. Samuel B. Woodward: A 19th Century Pioneer In American Psychiatric Care, Janet L. Dadoly, Len Levin, Lisa A. Palmer May 2005

Dr. Samuel B. Woodward: A 19th Century Pioneer In American Psychiatric Care, Janet L. Dadoly, Len Levin, Lisa A. Palmer

Library Posters and Presentations

Objective: Showcase the life and work of Dr. Samuel B. Woodward, the medical superintendent of one of the first public hospitals for the mentally ill in the U.S., the Worcester State Hospital in Worcester, Mass. Dr. Woodward overcame then-popular views of mental illness to champion compassionate, optimistic, and individualized treatment for patients.

Methods: Dr. Samuel B. Woodward brought a significant paradigm shift to the dark world of mentally ill indigent citizens of Massachusetts in the early 19th century. When Dr. Woodward became the first superintendent of Worcester State Hospital in 1833, mentally ill patients were viewed with suspicion and ...


Osler And The Infected Letter, Charles T. Ambrose May 2005

Osler And The Infected Letter, Charles T. Ambrose

Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics Faculty Publications

The spread of infectious agents through the mail has concerned public health officials for 5 centuries. The dissemination of anthrax spores in the US mail in 2001 was a recent example. In 1901, two medical journals reported outbreaks of smallpox presumably introduced by letters contaminated with variola viruses. The stability and infectivity of the smallpox virus are reviewed from both a historical (anecdotal) perspective and modern virologic studies. Bubonic plague was the contagious disease that led to quarantines as early as the 14th century in port cities in southern Europe. Later, smallpox, cholera, typhus, and yellow fever were recognized as ...


The Secret Kappa Lambda Society Of Hippocrates (And The Origin Of The American Medical Association's Principles Of Medical Ethics), Charles T. Ambrose Jan 2005

The Secret Kappa Lambda Society Of Hippocrates (And The Origin Of The American Medical Association's Principles Of Medical Ethics), Charles T. Ambrose

Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics Faculty Publications

This paper relates the neglected history of an idealistic, secret medical fraternity which existed briefly in Lexington, Kentucky, during the first half of the 19th century. It was created for students in the Medical Department at Transylvania University, the fifth US medical school, founded in 1799. One goal of the fraternity was to counter the widespread dissension and often violent quarrels among doctors that characterized American medicine of that period. And to that end, it was among the first to promote Thomas Percival's code of medical ethics in this country. Branches of the fraternity were established in Philadelphia and ...