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Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2005

Medicine and Health Sciences

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Mental

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Young People's Help-Seeking For Mental Health Problems., Debra Rickwood, Frank P. Deane, Coralie J. Wilson, Joseph V. Ciarrochi Jan 2005

Young People's Help-Seeking For Mental Health Problems., Debra Rickwood, Frank P. Deane, Coralie J. Wilson, Joseph V. Ciarrochi

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This paper summarises an ambitious research agenda aiming to uncover the factors that affect help-seeking among young people for mental health problems. The research set out to consider why young people, and particularly young males, do not seek help when they are in psychological distress or suicidal; how professional services be made more accessible and attractive to young people; the factors that inhibit and facilitate help-seeking; and how community gatekeepers can support young people to access services to help with personal and emotional problems. A range of studies was undertaken in New South Wales, Queensland and the ACT, using both ...


Collaborative Recovery: An Integrative Model For Working With Individuals Who Experience Chronic And Recurring Mental Illness, Lindsay G. Oades, Frank P. Deane, Trevor P. Crowe, Gordon Lambert, David Kavanagh, Christopher Lloyd Jan 2005

Collaborative Recovery: An Integrative Model For Working With Individuals Who Experience Chronic And Recurring Mental Illness, Lindsay G. Oades, Frank P. Deane, Trevor P. Crowe, Gordon Lambert, David Kavanagh, Christopher Lloyd

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Objectives: Recovery is an emerging movement in mental health. Evidence for recovery-based approaches is not well developed and approaches to implement recovery-oriented services are not well articulated. The collaborative recovery model (CRM) is presented as a model that assists clinicians to use evidencebased skills with consumers, in a manner consistent with the recovery movement. A current 5 year multisite Australian study to evaluate the effectiveness of CRM is briefly described. Conclusion: The collaborative recovery model puts into practice several aspects of policy regarding recovery-oriented services, using evidence-based practices to assist individuals who have chronic or recurring mental disorders (CRMD). It ...