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2005

American Studies

Caddo

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Bossier Tribes, Caddo In North Louisiana's Pineywoods, Jon L. Gibson Jan 2005

Bossier Tribes, Caddo In North Louisiana's Pineywoods, Jon L. Gibson

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Clarence Webb (1948) christened Bossier more than a half century ago. Its namesake was the northwestern Louisiana parish where several Bossier sites were located, but it could just as easily been named after Webster, Claiborne, Harrison, Columbia, or other political subdivisions in northwestern Louisiana, southwestern Arkansas, or eastern Texas where its distinctive pottery was found. This is Caddo country, linguistically and ethnically. Bossier is the issue of Caddoan cultural tradition, a culmination of agents, practices, and histories that transpired in the Red River valley and adjoining Pineywoods hills between ca. A.D. 1300 and 1500.

Bossier is best known for ...


Casanas, Hidalgo, And Espinosa: A Spanish Leaming Curve, Mariah F. Wade Jan 2005

Casanas, Hidalgo, And Espinosa: A Spanish Leaming Curve, Mariah F. Wade

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

In 1690, Alonso de Leon arrived in East Texas to establish two missions among the Asinai. He was accompanied by Fr. Fontcuberta, Fr. Casanas, Fr. Bordoy, Fr. Massanet, and Brother Antonio. Fr. Massanet returned to Mexico to inform the Viceroy about the trip, and came back to East Texas with Teran de Los Rios in August 1691. Fr. Fontcuberta died in February 1691 of an epidemic that, according to Fr. Casanas, killed about 3,000 natives in the area. Fr. Casanas who died in New Mexico in 1696, left us the first intimate view of the Caddoan-speaking groups in East ...


Caddo Archives And Economies, Paul S. Marceaux Jan 2005

Caddo Archives And Economies, Paul S. Marceaux

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

This article is a discussion of archival research on contact through historic period (ca. A.D. 1519 to 18th century) Caddo groups in eastern Texas and west central Louisiana. First, I describe general objectives for current and long-term research on the Caddo Indians, followed by the central issues the article will address. A brief summary of protohistoric and historic events, actors, and sources will be followed by methodological considerations, as well as a discussion of Caddo economies, concluding with some reflections on Caddo archives and economies. This article explores the complex and interrelated economies of Native American and European populations ...


Note On A Possible Chipped Stone Grubbing Tool From Upshur County, Texas, Christopher Lintz, Floyd Largent Jan 2005

Note On A Possible Chipped Stone Grubbing Tool From Upshur County, Texas, Christopher Lintz, Floyd Largent

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

During the period August 6-27, and November 18-20, 2003, archeologists from Geo-Marine Inc. (GMI), of Plano, Texas, conducted a pedestrian survey of a 51.5 km-long corridor for the proposed Southside Regional Water System in Marion, Harrison, Upshur, and Gregg counties, Texas. The proposed waterline is intended to draw water from Lake O The Pines in the Big Cypress drainage system and distribute it to various communities in both the Big Cypress and Little Cypress Creek basins in the aforementioned counties. Specifically, the pipeline will benefit the communities of Ore City, Old Diana, Diana, and James before the pipeline crosses ...


The Pine Saddle Site (3pl1080) In The Ouachita Mountains, Polk County, Arkansas, Timothy K. Perttula, Bo Nelson Jan 2005

The Pine Saddle Site (3pl1080) In The Ouachita Mountains, Polk County, Arkansas, Timothy K. Perttula, Bo Nelson

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Novaculite was procured and knapped by aboriginal Indian populations living in southwestern Arkansas for thousands of years, and there are numerous prehistoric novaculite quarries in the Ouachita Mountains. In Late Archaic times. this desirable material was widely traded and exchanged with other groups to the south, east, and west, particularly with the peoples living at the Poverty Point site and environs in the lower Mississippi valley in northern Louisiana. Later groups such as the Caddo also made considerable use of this material, since it was in their traditional homelands, and many habitation sites and mound centers in the region contain ...


Cavanaugh: A Late Prehistoric Platform Mound In Western Arkansas, Gregory Vogel Jan 2005

Cavanaugh: A Late Prehistoric Platform Mound In Western Arkansas, Gregory Vogel

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Cavanaugh Mound (3SB3, also known as Etter's Mound, Jones Mound, Site Zeta, and occasionally misspelled Cavenaugh) is a largely intact Late Prehistoric platform mound on the Arkansas River just east of the Oklahoma border, about 14 km from the Spiro Mounds complex. The site is situated on a high terrace above the Arkansas River as it runs between the Ouachita Mountains to the south and the Ozarks to the north. The Poteau River enters the Arkansas River floodplain just west of Cavanaugh, creating one of the widest stretches of bottomland in the region. The area immediately around Cavanaugh Mound ...


Mapping A Novaculite Quarry In Hot Springs National Park, Mary Beth D. Trubitt Jan 2005

Mapping A Novaculite Quarry In Hot Springs National Park, Mary Beth D. Trubitt

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Novaculite quarries in the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma were created through largescale extraction of lithic raw materials, used for stone tools by Caddos and other Native Americans over the past 11,000 years and in recent centuries by Euro-Americans for whetstones. Quarry sites are characterized by surface features like large pits. trenches, battered boulders, and debris piles. This article summarizes the results of an Arkansas Archeological Survey research project that described and mapped surface features at one site (3GA22J to provide a better understanding of the problems and potential of documenting novaculite quarries.


A Rediscovery Of Caddo Heritage: The W. T. Scott Collection At The American Museum Of Natural History, Robert Cast, Timothy K. Perttula, Bobby Gonzalez, Bo Nelson Jan 2005

A Rediscovery Of Caddo Heritage: The W. T. Scott Collection At The American Museum Of Natural History, Robert Cast, Timothy K. Perttula, Bobby Gonzalez, Bo Nelson

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Back in August 1997, the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma had submitted a Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) claim for a cranium that had been obtained by the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York City in 1877. Very little information was known about these remains, other than it had been obtained "as a purchase/gift" to the museum by Charles C, Jones Jr. and was "found in a mound" somewhere near the "Shreveport vicinity" in Caddo or Bossier Parish, Louisiana. "Based on the presence of artificial cranial deformation," the museum dated these human remains to ...


The M. W. Burks Site (41wd52): A Late Caddo Hamlet In Wood County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Bob D. Skiles, Bonnie C. Yates Jan 2005

The M. W. Burks Site (41wd52): A Late Caddo Hamlet In Wood County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Bob D. Skiles, Bonnie C. Yates

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

While attempting to locate and evaluate prehistoric Caddo archaeological sites in the Dry Creek watershed, Wood County, Texas, that had been originally recorded by A. T. Jackson and M. M. Reese in 1930, the M. W. Burks site (41WD52) was discovered by James E. Bruseth and Bob D. Skiles in June 1977. The site is in the Forest Hill community, about 5 km north of Quitman, Texas, in the East Texas Pineywoods and Gulf Coastal Plain. It is on a small rise in the uplands overlooking a small intermittent drainage that is an unnamed tributary of Little Dry Creek.

The ...