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The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2005/2006, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Dec 2005

The John Muir Newsletter, Winter 2005/2006, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

Radical Transcendentalism: Emerson, Muir and the Experience of Nature by James Brannon Palo Alto Center for Science and the Humanities, Palo Alto, CA ©2006 The uniquely American Transcendentalist School which formed in Harvard-influenced 1830's Cambridge brought a New Idea regarding man, spirit, and nature to a young country struggling to find its own voice. As its chief proponent, Ralph Waldo Emerson conveyed a philosophy that was considered radical in its time. The young John Muir, raised in an environment of harsh Puritan sensibilities and Christian dogma, took strongly to the Transcendental ideas as he was introduced to them at ...


Bangor Literary Reading Contest, Maureen Elgersman - Lee (Ed.) Oct 2005

Bangor Literary Reading Contest, Maureen Elgersman - Lee (Ed.)

The Griot

No abstract provided.


Reach Out: The Newsletter Of Maine Speakout Project (Fall 2005), Maine Speakout Project, Community Counseling Center Oct 2005

Reach Out: The Newsletter Of Maine Speakout Project (Fall 2005), Maine Speakout Project, Community Counseling Center

Reach Out

No abstract provided.


Equality News (Fall 2005), Rodney Mondor Oct 2005

Equality News (Fall 2005), Rodney Mondor

Equality News

No abstract provided.


The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Aug 2005

The John Muir Newsletter, Fall 2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

The John Muir pnr h VJ-& r? 5? UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC, STOCKTON, CA Volume 15, Number ■ YMJLMQt John Muir's World Tour (part II) Introduction by W. R. Swagerty Director, John Muir Center In the last issue of this newsletter, we introduced John Muir's World Tour of 1903-04. We continue that story here, told by Muir himself by way of his unpublished journal, a part of the John Muir Papers held by the University of the Pacific's Holt- Atherton Department of Special Collections. Part II begins where Part I ended with Journal # 48 (out of eighty-four extant in the Muir Papers). We print the journals as Linnie Marsh Wolfe transcribed them a half century ago. Where she could not read a word, I have made an earnest effort to decipher what Muir penciled in his small notebook. At times, he inserted lines in between other lines, making it very difficult to read. At other times, he used abbreviations, some of which Wolfe decoded, some of which remain undetermined. Where words are clearly illegible, I have indicated such in brackets. I have made no attempt to provide academic comment on the journal. It is the raw transcript as found in the Muir Papers. We begin on the reverse end of Journal # 48, which has a series of entries out of chronological sequence. Journal # 49 follows and is printed in its entirety, taking Muir and his two companions, arborist Charles Sprague Sargent and his son, Robeson, by train across western Siberia from the Russian city of Rostov on the Don River, July 26, 1903 through Harbin toward Vladivostock on August 15. We include the first few pages of Journal # 50, taking the Muir-Sargent party through Manchuria to the coast on August 21, where he writes, "The sea air reviving. Hope to leave this evening 9:00 P.M. for Kabarovsk." In 1993-1994, the John Muir Newsletter printed "John Muir in Russia " by University of Pacific Professor William H. Breenan. This three-part analysis of Muir's trip across "Old Russia " remains an important piece of Muir scholarship. We offer it to our readers as a reprint for S3, to cover reproduction and postage. *** Tke reverse end of #48 In Regel Nursery, Petersburg - Leoutipodium, Alpiuum, Ende[?J Heuckera sanguinea, Gentiana Burscriana, large yellow pale, 3 toot kigk. Gentiaua listea, D foot kigk, Lrigkt vjellow, mamj flowers in wkorls. Regel and Kisselring: Campanula kumilis, lovekj crowded, multitude of bluebells close to ground. Samara at tke crossing of Volga: Ufa Celyeabinsk, on west and east sides of Urals. Before reacking Urals, clumps of pine run tkrougk. Forest fires destroij kundreds of villages. Ufa prettikj situated on wooded kill. East of Ckekjabinsk tke ground flat for 2000 miles (?) Omsk, 50,000 population. In center of rick agricultural country and pasture. A belt 2000 miles wide of forest to nortk, but fine forest kills to soutk. (Continuedon page 4) page 1 IEY& Birthday /Earth Day 2006 and Annual Meeting Celebrate John Muir's Birthday and Earth Day on April 22, 2006, 10am to 4pm at the John Muir National Historic Site in Martinez, California. The house and grounds will be alive with music and exhibits about earth-friendly technologies and programs that sustain the environment. Learn about solar power, green building, wildlife conservation, hybrid vehicles, organic gardening, recycling, and much more. Admission to the park is free; food and beverages will be available. Rain or shine, come and follow in the footsteps of John Muir. John Muir Mountain Day Camp In its fourth year, the John Muir Mountain Day Camp, now a program of the John Muir Association, is an outgrowth of the John Muir Festival Center whose aim is to promote and foster Martinez as a world class destination for Arts, Culture and Education. It began as an educational outreach of the Willows Theatre John Muir Mountain Days musical. The day camp is operated on the grounds of the John ...


Reach Out: The Newsletter Of Maine Speakout Project (Summer 2005), Maine Speakout Project, Community Counseling Center Jul 2005

Reach Out: The Newsletter Of Maine Speakout Project (Summer 2005), Maine Speakout Project, Community Counseling Center

Reach Out

No abstract provided.


Equality News (Summer 2005), Rodney Mondor Jul 2005

Equality News (Summer 2005), Rodney Mondor

Equality News

No abstract provided.


The John Muir Newsletter, Summer 2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Jun 2005

The John Muir Newsletter, Summer 2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

EjOi HVfeRSnY OF' THE PACIFIC, STOCKTON. CA : Volume 15, Numbers Summer 2005::= r ORLD IOUR Introduction by W. R. Swagerty Director, John Muir Center John Muir's World Tour of 1903-1904 is not well known for good reason. The journals from this trip have never been published and Muir wrote no specific book from his European travels. The manuscript journals are part of the John Muir Papers within Holt-Atherton Special Collections here at Pacific. The journals are lengthy and were transcribed by Muir scholar, Linnie Marsh Wolfe, sometime in the 1940s or 1950s. They have also been microfilmed as part ...


The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies Apr 2005

The John Muir Newsletter, Spring 2005, The John Muir Center For Environmental Studies

John Muir Newsletters

OHN NEWi r^' T/W ______ TEE UNIVERSITY OF THE ET JO>A «^ KTON, fc* Volume 15, Number 2 SPRING 2005: A Wealth of Muir on Wealth by Michael Wurtz Archivist, Holt-Atherton Special Collections University of the Pacific Library (/ gf>9 a life km mm o^i-iL., Perhaps one of John Muir's earliest understandings about the measurement of wealth may have come as he heard his father calling down the well to him, "get in the bucket!" This fateful moment had come about because his father would not spend the money for a professional well digger and blaster. Why ...


Equality News (Spring 2005), Rodney Mondor Apr 2005

Equality News (Spring 2005), Rodney Mondor

Equality News

No abstract provided.


No Place To Call Home: The 1807-1857 Life Writings Of Caroline Barnes Crosby, Chronicler Of Outlying Mormon Communities, Edward Leo Lyman, Susan Ward Payne, S. George Ellsworth Jan 2005

No Place To Call Home: The 1807-1857 Life Writings Of Caroline Barnes Crosby, Chronicler Of Outlying Mormon Communities, Edward Leo Lyman, Susan Ward Payne, S. George Ellsworth

All USU Press Publications

Caroline Crosby's life took a wandering course between her 1834 marriage to Jonathan Crosby and conversion to the infant Mormon Church and her departure for her final home, Utah, on New Year's Day, 1858. In the intervening years, she lived in many places but never long enough to set firm roots. Her adherence to a frontier religion on the move kept her moving, even after the church began to settle down in Utah. Despite the impermanence of her situation, perhaps even because of it, Caroline Crosby left a remarkably rich record of her life and travels, thereby telling ...


Hillbilly: A Cultural History Of An American Icon, Anthony Harkins Jan 2005

Hillbilly: A Cultural History Of An American Icon, Anthony Harkins

History Faculty Book Gallery

In this pioneering work of cultural history, historian Anthony Harkins argues that the hillbilly-in his various guises of "briar hopper," "brush ape," "ridge runner," and "white trash"-has been viewed by mainstream Americans simultaneously as a violent degenerate who threatens the modern order and as a keeper of traditional values of family, home, and physical production, and thus symbolic of a nostalgic past free of the problems of contemporary life. "Hillbilly" signifies both rugged individualism and stubborn backwardness, strong family and kin networks but also inbreeding and bloody feuds. Spanning film, literature, and the entire expanse of American popular culture ...


Appalachian Uplands Region Map, Canadian-American Center Cartography Jan 2005

Appalachian Uplands Region Map, Canadian-American Center Cartography

Maps for Teaching​ Canada

Map of Canada highlighting the Appalachian Uplands region


Arctic Archipelago Region Map, Canadian-American Center Cartography Jan 2005

Arctic Archipelago Region Map, Canadian-American Center Cartography

Maps for Teaching​ Canada

A map of Canada highlighting the Arctic archipelago region


Rallying Round Our Liberty, Wendell Dobbs, Leo Welch, Linda Dobbs, Neil Cadle Jan 2005

Rallying Round Our Liberty, Wendell Dobbs, Leo Welch, Linda Dobbs, Neil Cadle

Recordings

No abstract provided.


What Caused The Civil War? Reflections On The South And Southern History, Edward L. Ayers Jan 2005

What Caused The Civil War? Reflections On The South And Southern History, Edward L. Ayers

Bookshelf

The Southern past has proven to be fertile ground for great works of history. Peculiarities of tragic proportions—a system of slavery flourishing in a land of freedom, secession and Civil War tearing at a federal Union, deep poverty persisting in a nation of fast-paced development—have fed the imaginations of some of our most accomplished historians.

Foremost in their ranks today is Edward L. Ayers, author of the award-winning and ongoing study of the Civil War in the heart of America, the Valley of the Shadow Project. In wide-ranging essays on the Civil War, the New South, and the ...


Juanitas Family: Eudosia Juanitas (Elder), Tucker Corriveau Jan 2005

Juanitas Family: Eudosia Juanitas (Elder), Tucker Corriveau

Filipino American Stories

Eudosia Juanitas is a registered nurse among a family of physicians, pharmacists and scientists. Upon first glance, it might appear that Eudosia simply took advantage of the opportunities presented to a woman in a privileged family. However, deeper inspection reveals a woman who has fought against difficult odds to create a life of realized dreams…


Nisby Family: James (Jim) Santana (Elder), Christopher Anderson Jan 2005

Nisby Family: James (Jim) Santana (Elder), Christopher Anderson

African American Stories

James Santana spent his teen years on a farm. His parents stressed self-sufficiency. He learned to cook, clean, iron, and even sew. Living on a farm generated chores most children did not have. James learned to take care of chickens, rabbits, ducks, and turkeys. Despite being the youngest of four siblings, his workload was never adjusted downward. During school breaks and summer vacations, he was expected to help his father, who was a carpenter…


Wong Family: Nancy Wong (Elder), May Lin Jan 2005

Wong Family: Nancy Wong (Elder), May Lin

Chinese American Stories

Nancy Wong was born in Ung Hong village, Toy San District, China, to a restaurant owner and housewife. Growing up, Nancy felt like a child who did not know much about the world. When Nancy was seven, her mother left Nancy and her younger brother to travel to the U.S. Nancy and her brother Donald, were left with their grandmother. At age nine, her grandmother sent her to school. When Nancy was 15, her mother returned to China with three sisters and four brothers for which Nancy was to care. This began her adulthood in her mind…


Wong Family: John Wong (Elder), Christina Tran Jan 2005

Wong Family: John Wong (Elder), Christina Tran

Chinese American Stories

In 1932, at the age of 15, John Wong and his family received news of a terrible tragedy—the death of his mother. John was the oldest of 10 children, and with this news, his world changed. He took on new responsibilities; he worked to be a good example for his siblings, and helped instruct them as a parent would. The death of his mother made him feel more like an adult because he became the second parental figure, along with his dad. The passing of his mother left a painful reminder that his childhood had ended abruptly and his ...


Lo Family: John Lo (Youth), Jillian Altfest Jan 2005

Lo Family: John Lo (Youth), Jillian Altfest

Hmong American Stories

John Lo’s parents were often away from the home, so John took on the parental responsibilities when they were gone. By age 13, he cooked, cleaned and took care of his younger brothers and sisters. Older siblings were not available to help. Although often frustrated, he accepted these responsibilities. Looking back he feels he did a good job; in fact, this may have been his first step toward adulthood…


Stallworth Family: Bishop Lewis Stallworth, Sr. (Elder), Brandon Stevens Jan 2005

Stallworth Family: Bishop Lewis Stallworth, Sr. (Elder), Brandon Stevens

African American Stories

Bishop L. Stallworth was born in Welty, Oklahoma in 1923. Not long after relocating to Boley, Oklahoma, Lewis attended school and graduated from high school in 1941. The following year, Lewis along with the rest of his family, joined similar migrants seeking new opportunities in California’s emerging defense industry. Lewis fondly remembers his military experiences that allowed him both to serve his country and to interact with different people. Although he was already of adult age when he left his home state, Lewis’s coming-of-age process was reinforced by his years of military service…


Lo Family: Chue Lo (Elder), Nancy Snider Jan 2005

Lo Family: Chue Lo (Elder), Nancy Snider

Hmong American Stories

At the age of 55, Chue Lo is the elder of his family. Chue was born in Laos the second of six children. While his parents might have known a time of stability in Laos, Chue and his siblings grew up with difficult and unstable conditions caused by a period of political unrest. Despite this, Chue’s parents insisted he continue to attend school. In his studies, he learned to speak several languages in addition to his native Hmong. According to Chue, there are no specific rituals to signify coming-of-age. His family recognized him as an adult when he had ...


Stallworth Family: Lewis Stallworth, Jr. (Middle), Andrew Gelber Jan 2005

Stallworth Family: Lewis Stallworth, Jr. (Middle), Andrew Gelber

African American Stories

African Americans like Lewis Stallworth Jr.’s family did not migrate to Stockton as a part of the California Gold Rush. Instead, they sought stability in changing times: a home, a job, a place to worship and a chance to raise a family. Lewis Jr. was born in Wewoka, Oklahoma in 1944. As the eldest child, his brothers and sisters admired him. The family moved to Stockton when Lewis was still a young child and he has lived here for the past 60 years…


Sorn Family: Leakhena Sorn (Youth), Christina Tran Jan 2005

Sorn Family: Leakhena Sorn (Youth), Christina Tran

Cambodian American Stories

In October 1991, Leakhena Sorn was 13 years old when she immigrated to Stockton from Cambodia. Learning a new language and adjusting to a new culture often made her feel isolated during the transition to life in Stockton. Because of Leakhena’s arrival after the first major emigration from Cambodia, she enjoyed the support of an already established Cambodian community. Many Stockton Cambodians were already graduating from universities and had established careers as pharmacists, physicians or as business owners…


Wong Family: Kecia Won-Jones (Youth), Tucker Corriveau Jan 2005

Wong Family: Kecia Won-Jones (Youth), Tucker Corriveau

Chinese American Stories

Growing up, Kecia Won-Jones experienced a plethora of cultures. She is Chinese, but was born and raised in a multi-cultural America. Though she is a third generation Chinese American, she feels a strong connection to her ethnic past. On the other hand, she confesses that her parents were assimilated into American culture, and that she has lived only in this country. Kecia likes to think she has the better of two worlds. Kecia is grateful for the opportunity to celebrate her cultural traditions as well as those of others. Navigating diversity has been one of her paths to maturity…


Stallworth Family: Kimberly Hamlett (Youth), Brett Kaufman Jan 2005

Stallworth Family: Kimberly Hamlett (Youth), Brett Kaufman

African American Stories

As a child of the ’60s, a person might think Kimberly Hamlett would show signs of her rebellious generation. However, those who know this warm, kindhearted and Christian woman would say differently. Kimberly, born in 1965, was the first child born to her large family. She is the oldest of seven children, four girls and three boys. She was born in Walnut Creek, but grew up in Stockton and continues to live here…


Nisby Family: John Patrick Nisby, Jr. (Youth), Chris Bauer Jan 2005

Nisby Family: John Patrick Nisby, Jr. (Youth), Chris Bauer

African American Stories

Being the son of two high-achievers might be a burden for some people, but John Patrick Nisby says that he has had a “wonderful life.” His parents have played positive roles in his upbringing, introducing many factors into his life, which have inspired and motivated him...


Pech Family: Kun Tuy (Middle), Lindsey Gaines Jan 2005

Pech Family: Kun Tuy (Middle), Lindsey Gaines

Cambodian American Stories

Imagine a 15-year-old girl forced to work in the fields, seven days a week, from five in the morning until seven at night. In the U.S., such a young woman would be going to school to learn about herself and about life’s opportunities. Kun Tuy dreamed of teaching dance. Instead, she was put to work by the Khmer Rouge in the rice fields of mountainous Cambodia. She received no money and little food for her labor. The Khmer Rouge ruled by suppression and killing in anticipation of establishing a Communist regime in Cambodia…


Sorn Family: Sonn Meong (Elder), Amy Smith Jan 2005

Sorn Family: Sonn Meong (Elder), Amy Smith

Cambodian American Stories

Traditional music and the sound of the Khmer language are among Sonn Moeng’s favorite childhood memories. They remind him of a homeland and a way of life devastated by war. Today, he lives in an adopted country, surrounded by a language he does not speak and struggles to understand a culture that is not his own…