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Review Of Virtue And The Veil Of Illusion: Generic Innovation And The Pedagogical Project In Eighteenth-Century Literature By Dorothea Von Mücke, Priscilla A. Hayden-Roy Dec 1992

Review Of Virtue And The Veil Of Illusion: Generic Innovation And The Pedagogical Project In Eighteenth-Century Literature By Dorothea Von Mücke, Priscilla A. Hayden-Roy

German Language and Literature Papers

This original and wide-ranging comparative study examines how emergent literary genres in eighteenth-century Europe participate in the pedagogical project of male subject formation. The author focuses on the intersection of semiotics, pedagogy and aesthetics, and demonstrates how changing models of signification give rise to new strategies in subject formation. Drawing on Foucault, she identifies two major semiotic paradigm shifts in the eighteenth century: first the "transparency model" of the mid-eighteenth century, which presumes that the sign is an ideal representation of the signified; and second the "intransitive" or "self-referential model" that emerges late in the century. With each of these ...


Simon Sulzer And The Consequences Of The 1563 Strasbourg Consensus In Switzerland, Amy Nelson Burnett Nov 1992

Simon Sulzer And The Consequences Of The 1563 Strasbourg Consensus In Switzerland, Amy Nelson Burnett

Faculty Publications, Department of History

From 1561 to 1563 the Strasbourg church was wracked by a bitter controversy between Johann Marbach, leader of the city's clergy, and Girolamo Zanchi, professor at the Strasbourg Academy. The controversy was finally resolved in March 1563, when the two parties signed a consensus on the disputed issues of predestination, the perseverance of the saints, and the Lord's Supper. Modern historians of doctrine generally discuss the Strasbourg controversy and the 1563 Consensus in the context of the struggle of later sixteenth-century Lutheranism to define orthodoxy, and they stress that the disagreement focused not on the sacrament of the ...


His And Hers: Male And Female Anatomy In Anatomy Texts For U.S. Medical Students, 1890–1989, Susan C. Lawrence, Kae Bendixen Oct 1992

His And Hers: Male And Female Anatomy In Anatomy Texts For U.S. Medical Students, 1890–1989, Susan C. Lawrence, Kae Bendixen

Faculty Publications, Department of History

Much recent work on gender has emphasized how ideas of male and female differences underlie cultural assumptions about appropriate social relations, behavior, institutions and knowledge. This study focuses on the specific ways that anatomy texts for medical students in the United States have presented male and female anatomy between 1890 and 1989, using both numerical data and analysis of textual examples from 31 texts. Despite public debates about gender representation, anatomy texts have generally remained consistent in how “the” human body has been depicted in this century. In illustrations, vocabulary and syntax, these texts primarily depict male anatomy as the ...


A Response To Mohan Limaye, Barbara Couture Oct 1992

A Response To Mohan Limaye, Barbara Couture

Faculty Publications -- Department of English

Mohan Limaye presents two important concerns in his insightful response to my article [“Categorizing Professional Discourse: Engineering, Administrative, and Technical/Professional Writing,” Journal of Business and Technical Communication 6:1 (January 1992), pp. 5–37]. I wish to comment on these points and also to submit a correction to the text of the article.


Textile Society Of America Newsletter 4:11 – Fall 1992 Oct 1992

Textile Society Of America Newsletter 4:11 – Fall 1992

Textile Society of America Newsletters

Letter from the President
“Research in Progress”
Area Activities
TSA Board of Directors
Letter from the Past President
Symposium Luncheon Meetings
The Practicing Artist
European Textiles
Aspects of Social Change
Announcements
Calls for Papers & Proposals
Lectures, Classes, and Workshops
Conferences, Meetings, Symposia
Textiles at Biltmore House
Fellowships & Prizes
Peggy Stoltz Gilfoy Memorial
Publications
Exhibitions
TSA Calendar


Review Of Maria Perry, The Word Of A Prince: A Life Of Elizabeth I From Contemporary Documents, Carole Levin Oct 1992

Review Of Maria Perry, The Word Of A Prince: A Life Of Elizabeth I From Contemporary Documents, Carole Levin

Faculty Publications, Department of History

Beautifully put together with magnificent illustrations. Perry's work has more the feel of a coffee-table book. What Perry, a professional actress, has done is to gather well chosen documents and string them together into a biographical narrative. Perry's great contribution is giving the reader Elizabeth in her own voice. Perry decided to do the book after performing "The Speeches of Queen Elizabeth I," and her enthusiasm for Elizabeth is obvious. ... Some of Perry's assumptions about Elizabeth are questionable and suggest pop psychology. I am not convinced that Elizabeth wept easily, nor would I characterize her as a ...


Oration Of Kathleen Adams Jul 1992

Oration Of Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

If William Shakespeare is the most famous writer to have come out of Warwickshire, the runner-up is undoubtedly George Eliot. Her greatest novel, Middlemarch, reflects the life of the city of Coventry in the early nineteenth century. Mrs. Kathleen Adams is herself a native of Coventry and has completed 25 years as the secretary of the George Eliot Fellowship. She attended Barr's Hill Grammar School; after leaving school she worked in the local Inland Revenue office where she met her future husband. After the birth of her two children she worked for 23 years as a school secretary at ...


Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Gardens, Nuneaton, Michael Sadgrove Jun 1992

Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Gardens, Nuneaton, Michael Sadgrove

The George Eliot Review

I am honoured to have been asked to lay a wreath in memory of George Eliot this afternoon. And, I can truly say, I do it in grateful memory. Not many years ago I would have to have confessed that I had not yet read any of her novels. On coming to Coventry, I decided to remedy this situation. For me, whatever town or city I have lived in, its sense of place has been defined very much by its literary associations, the part it has played in the imaginations of its writers and poets. As far as Coventry is ...


Westminster Abbey Wreath-Laying June 20th 1992, Kathleen Adams Jun 1992

Westminster Abbey Wreath-Laying June 20th 1992, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

George Eliot and religion is a vast subject and one that can only be lightly touched on today. But it is relevant to our being here because of the memorial stone in front of us. It took 100 years to get here and, because of the years of fund-raising by the George Eliot Fellowship as well as the many visits to the Abbey to negotiate the placing of the memorial stone in Poets' Corner in June 1980, is perhaps even more significant to us than a tomb or memorial would be that bad been erected in 1880 instead of 1980 ...


In The Steps Of Jael And Deborah: Judith As Heroine, Sidnie White Crawford May 1992

In The Steps Of Jael And Deborah: Judith As Heroine, Sidnie White Crawford

Faculty Publications, Classics and Religious Studies Department

Judith is one of the most memorable characters in Hebrew literature. In a remarkable story of courage and resourcefulness, she saves her people by one single action that is both compelling and repugnant. Leading female characters are rare enough in Israelite literature to be constantly compared with one another, and Judith has often been likened to Miriam, Deborah, Jael, the wise women of Tekoa and Abelbeth-Maacah, and Esther. And this is not an exhaustive list! I would like to argue that the comparison to Jael and Deborah is neither superficial nor coincidental, but that the author of Judith had the ...


New And Old Histories: The Case Of Hölderlin And Württemberg Pietism, Priscilla A. Hayden-Roy Apr 1992

New And Old Histories: The Case Of Hölderlin And Württemberg Pietism, Priscilla A. Hayden-Roy

German Language and Literature Papers

Literary opinion generally concurs that Friedrich Hölderlin, whose writings abound with Christian references, was in some manner influenced by the pietist milieu of his native Württemberg. The precise nature of this influence is still in the process of being clarified, and results of the research vary widely depending on how Württemberg pietism is defined, what sources are consulted, and to what extent social or institutional factors are considered. Much of the literature addressing this topic is informed by historiographical assumptions which tend to flatten both Württemberg pietism and Hölderlin's writings into a historical teleology. I would like to examine ...


Textile Society Of America Newsletter 4:2 – Spring/Summer 1992 Apr 1992

Textile Society Of America Newsletter 4:2 – Spring/Summer 1992

Textile Society of America Newsletters

From the President
Symposium Registration
TSA Board
1992 TSA Nominations
Update on the Gobelins
Classes, Conferences, Lectures, Symposia
Events
Publications
Exhibitions
TSA Calendar


Textile Society Of America Newsletter 4:9 – April 1992 Apr 1992

Textile Society Of America Newsletter 4:9 – April 1992

Textile Society of America Newsletters

Fall ’92 Symposium: A Diverse and Promising Program
Notices
Publications
Exhibits


Review Of Public Libraries In Nazi Germany, By Margaret F. Stieg., Alan E. Steinweis Apr 1992

Review Of Public Libraries In Nazi Germany, By Margaret F. Stieg., Alan E. Steinweis

Faculty Publications, Department of History

Nazi cultural policy has only recently begun to attract a level of scholarly attention commensurate with its importance. Having relied for decades on memoirs, fragmentary documentary publications, and impressionistic accounts, historians are now devoting their energies to systematic, in-depth studies of the experiences of artists, performers, and writers under National Socialism. Margaret F. Stieg's book augments this expanding literature by focusing on an institution that was central to the dissemination of culture and knowledge: the public library. The central theme of Stieg's study is, perhaps not surprisingly, the politicization of libraries and librarianship: "In its fully developed form ...


Sensate Language And The Hermetic Tradition In Friedrich Christoph Oetinger's Biblisches Und Emblematisches Wörterbuch, Priscilla A. Hayden-Roy Jan 1992

Sensate Language And The Hermetic Tradition In Friedrich Christoph Oetinger's Biblisches Und Emblematisches Wörterbuch, Priscilla A. Hayden-Roy

German Language and Literature Papers

The rise of rationalistic moral theology in the 18th century reflects the prevailing assumption of Enlightened thought that moral concepts were the privileged hermeneutical telos of the "coarse" or sensate language in the Bible and Christian dogma. The theological school known as neology supported this view and proposed an exegetical strategy for extracting the "pure" moral sense from the "coarse" or sensate text. In 1772 the Berlin neologian Wilhelm Abraham Teller (1734-1804) published a programmatic guide to this exegetical strategy, a dictionary entitled Wörterbuch des Neuen Testaments zur Erklärung der christlichen Lehre. I would like to discuss here a critical ...


Review Of Wolfgang Wittkowski, Ed., Revolution Und Autonomie: Deutsche Autonomieästhetik Im Zeitalter Der Französischen Revolution. Ein Symposium., Priscilla A. Hayden-Roy Jan 1992

Review Of Wolfgang Wittkowski, Ed., Revolution Und Autonomie: Deutsche Autonomieästhetik Im Zeitalter Der Französischen Revolution. Ein Symposium., Priscilla A. Hayden-Roy

German Language and Literature Papers

This volume is the last of five in a series edited by Wolfgang Wittkowski and based on symposia held at SUNY-Albany on various aspects of German Classicism. The topic of this last symposium—aesthetic autonomy— fairly bristles with controversy, as historically it has formed a dividing line of sorts between ideological camps within German literary scholarship. Beginning with the Bildungsbürgertum of the 19th century, aesthetic autonomy came to be defined as the mark of highest literary quality, defined formally in terms of closure, self-containment and “perfection,” and restricted in terms of content to the apolitical, “purely aesthetic” realm. On the ...


Fish, Fowl And Fauna, Daphne A. Deeds Jan 1992

Fish, Fowl And Fauna, Daphne A. Deeds

Sheldon Museum of Art Catalogues and Publications

As the art musem of the University of Nebraska, the Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery staff is committed to making the exceptional permanent collection available to all Nebraskans. The Sheldon Gallery's Statewide Touring Exhibition Program realizes that goal by circulating art of the highest quality to communities throughout the state. Each Statewide exhibition addresses an art historical genre or theme , and together the five exhibitions constitute a mini-art history course and a unique focus on the Sheldon Gallery's renowned collection. As the exhibition series continues , the relationships between diverse artworks are increasingly apparent.

FISH, FOWL AND FAUNA, offers a ...


4q364 & 365: A Preliminary Report, Sidnie White Crawford Jan 1992

4q364 & 365: A Preliminary Report, Sidnie White Crawford

Faculty Publications, Classics and Religious Studies Department

4Q364 and 365, part of the group of compositions (4Q364, 365, 366 and 367) provisionally entitled 4Q Pentateuchal Paraphrases, are part of the lot of Qumran manuscripts originally assigned to John Strugnell for publication. Strugnell, in 1989, asked me to join my colleague, Professor Emanuel Tov of the Hebrew University, in preparing these manuscripts for publication. This paper serves as an introduction and first statement on these manuscripts.

4Q364 and 365 are preserved on 20 plates of material, which contain about 150 fragments of text. The fragments range in size from two columns, preserving 15 lines, to fragments containing no ...


How To Live In The Heartland, Twyla Hansen Jan 1992

How To Live In The Heartland, Twyla Hansen

Nebraskiana Publications

Foreword by William Kloefkorn -7, How to Live in the Heartland -11, Airing Out -12, Country Girl -13, January Thaw -14, Making Lard -15, Headlines: Hometown Weekly -16, Nuance -17, My Brother Randall Teaches Me to Ride a Bicycle -18, Seamstress -19, Eddie -20, Nine-Mile Prairie, Mid-May -22, The Pine Grove -23, Kissing Cousins -24, Scars -25, Trumpetcreeper Vine -26, 1964 -27, Friday Night at the Plaza -28, After the Farm Sale -30, Highway -31, Night Shift at the Old Hospital, 1968 -32, Fantasy -34, Eyewash -35, Navigating the North Platte from Lingle to Torrington -36, When the Prairie Speaks ...


Coptic Dress In Egypt: The Social Life Of Medieval Cloth, Michael Bazinet Jan 1992

Coptic Dress In Egypt: The Social Life Of Medieval Cloth, Michael Bazinet

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

"Daily life" is a catchword in historiography for many of the things that historians traditionally have not considered, or have not been able to study due to gaps in historical records1. In archives and archaeology, the record of daily life activities is often very slim, even for times and places where both archives and archaeology are relatively rich. Egypt is one such place.

"Daily life" also implies a potential focus on the poor as well as the wealthy, on the oppressed as well as the empowered. The methodology for creating this focus remains difficult, even for ancient Egypt. For ...


Ruth Reeves' "Personal Prints" Printed Textiles From The 1930’S And 40'S, Whitney Blausen Jan 1992

Ruth Reeves' "Personal Prints" Printed Textiles From The 1930’S And 40'S, Whitney Blausen

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Introduction

Ruth Reeves pioneered the use of vat dyes and the screen-print process for furnishing fabrics in the late 1920's. Reeves had a positive genius for publicity, and if she was not the first American to experiment with these techniques, which she may well have been, she was without doubt one of the best known.

Reeves was one of a new breed of textile designers who emerged in the aftermath of the First World War. To hope to work as a textile designer was a risky experiment in itself. American mills employed buyers and copyists in far greater numbers ...


The Jinbaori: Oneupmanship On The Battlefield, Valerie Foley Jan 1992

The Jinbaori: Oneupmanship On The Battlefield, Valerie Foley

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

There are very few absolute statements that can be made about jinbaori in the sociological, cultural or historical sense, except that they were worn only by males of the military class in military settings. Some believe that the jinbaori constituted a kind of formal wear, which vassals wore in audience with their lords, yet there is some evidence to contradict this - for example, the fact that very few portraits exist of men in jinbaori, while portraits of men in armor abound. Indeed, one scroll shows a lord in jinbaori, his retainers in armor. There are several theories as to which ...


Handweaving In The Everyday Life Of Artisans, Merchants And Consumers In Fez, Morocco, In The 1980'S, Lotus Stack Jan 1992

Handweaving In The Everyday Life Of Artisans, Merchants And Consumers In Fez, Morocco, In The 1980'S, Lotus Stack

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

My original desire to study an urban center which still produced elaborate handmade textiles was to provide some possible clues to more seriously consider the practical side of historic production. In other words, what were the physical concerns and limitations of cloth production. In the end I learned that textiles often function in a very complex, multidimensional form and cannot be truly understood without considering many facets of the society which produced them. Conversely, in societies where textiles are highly valued, their study can add much to understanding everything from cultural values, economics and technology to international politics.

In addition ...


Categorizing Professional Discourse: Engineering, Administrative, And Technical/Professional Writing, Barbara Couture Jan 1992

Categorizing Professional Discourse: Engineering, Administrative, And Technical/Professional Writing, Barbara Couture

Faculty Publications -- Department of English

Rhetorical categories can and should be developed by scholars of professional writing to identify how values held within professions constrain the ways discourse is interpreted in organizational settings. Empirical research (conducted by the author and others), discourse theory, and pedagogical practice in professional writing strongly suggest that at least three categories of professional writing exist: engineering, administrative, and technical/professional writing. The author demonstrates this claim and distinguishes the characteristics of these three categories. Engineering writing is shown to respond to professional values of scientific objectivity and professional judgment as well as to corporate interests. Administrative writing reflects the locus ...


The Twenty-First George Eliot Memorial Lecture: The Names Of George Eliot, Ruth M. Harris Jan 1992

The Twenty-First George Eliot Memorial Lecture: The Names Of George Eliot, Ruth M. Harris

The George Eliot Review

'What's in a name?’ asked Juliet. Our response would surely be different if Romeo were no longer called Romeo, and from that romantic balcony in Verona there came the cry: 'O Egbert, Egbert, wherefore art thou, Egbert?' As an exploration of George Eliot's names should reveal, there is far more significance in names than Juliet or we might imagine.

Allowing for minor differences, George Eliot chose or was given seventeen different names during her life-time: Mary Ann(e) Evans, Little Mama, Marianne Evans, Marian Evans, Clematis, Deutera, Polly, Pollian, Marian Lewes, Marian Evans Lewes, Mutter, Madonna, The Prioress ...


Review Of George Eliot, Kristin Brady Jan 1992

Review Of George Eliot, Kristin Brady

The George Eliot Review

The general editors of this series, Eva Figes and Adele King, explain that there is a need for their series of feminist readings because much of the criticism on selected women writers by male critics is usually unfair, false or simplistic (vii). Kristin Brady very quickly and effectively proves their point in the first chapter of George Eliot by referring to many influential nineteenth- and twentieth-century male critics who were often more preoccupied with Eliot's appearance or what they judged to be her suspect femininity than with a straightforward consideration of her artistic achievements. Among such critics, says Brady ...


Review Of George Eliot And The Conflict Of Interpretations: A Reading Of The Novels, David Carroll Jan 1992

Review Of George Eliot And The Conflict Of Interpretations: A Reading Of The Novels, David Carroll

The George Eliot Review

Towards the climax of Felix Holt Esther Lyon moves centre stage. Mist around her own history and that of Transome Court dissolves to reveal a vista of possibilities. The narrator comments: 'Esther found it impossible to read in these days; her life was a book which she seemed to be constructing - trying to make character clear before her, and looking into the ways of destiny'. This lovely sentence might serve as the epigraph to David Carroll's study. A character in a novel, who is well-versed in romance narrative, finds herself an author, 'constructing' the book of her own life ...


Review Of Realist Fiction And The Strolling Spectator, John Rignall Jan 1992

Review Of Realist Fiction And The Strolling Spectator, John Rignall

The George Eliot Review

The problem of vision, of what the artist or writer sees, is among the most fascinating of the links between literature and painting, which separates them both from music. Vision itself implies something seen which cannot be separated from an inner quality of how it is seen. The I seeing and the eye seeing involves a synthesis which again distinguishes them both from the camera. The presence of this 'magic' which resists analysis has obsessed artists as frequently as critics, and led them to reject what seemed incapable of completion. A poem, according to W.H. Auden, was never finished ...


The Fashion's In The Bag: Recycling Feed, Flour, And Sugar Sacks During The Middle Decades Of The 20th Century, Rita Adrosko Jan 1992

The Fashion's In The Bag: Recycling Feed, Flour, And Sugar Sacks During The Middle Decades Of The 20th Century, Rita Adrosko

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

A modest temporary exhibit, FEED BAGS AS FASHION, opened in the National Museum of American History about a year ago (See fig. I).1 The enthusiastic and personal reactions evoked by the exhibit, and a story about it picked up by newspapers throughout the United States and Canada, made clear that the subject had touched a popular nerve. The responses of those who called or wrote, and visitors' comments, revealed that the recycling of flour, sugar, and animal feed sacks was a common, if not universal practice in the States between the 1920s and 1960s, still remembered vividly by both ...


German Jugendstil Tapestries: The Daily Life Of The People Who Made Them, Marianne Carlano Jan 1992

German Jugendstil Tapestries: The Daily Life Of The People Who Made Them, Marianne Carlano

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

INTRODUCTION

In the context of daily life of artists and artisans, I sought to learn about the intimate thoughts, conversations and ideas of the artists who provided the designs for the tapestries of the Kunstwebschule Sherrebek in Germany (1896-1903), as well as those of the artists/weavers who translated such designs into woven forms. Like many an intellectual endeavor, my industrious search revealed little information of this type. Nonetheless, it is possible, though surely only second best without the voices of the artists themselves, to glean some understanding of the founding of the Sherrebek institution, the people who worked there ...