Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Shall We Escape Analogy, Rosmarie Waldrop Nov 1989

Shall We Escape Analogy, Rosmarie Waldrop

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

Claude Royet-Journoud's and Anne-Marie Albiach's work can be read as manifestos against metaphor (relation by similarity, the vertical selection axis of the speech act) with which poetry has long been identified. Whereas Royet-Joumoud takes as his theme metaphor in the largest sense (including, finally, all representation that is based on analogy), Albiach's "Enigme" dramatizes the loss of the vertical dimension through, ironically, a metaphor: the fall of a body. Formally, both stress as alternative the horizontal axis of combination (especially the spatial articulation on the page) and the implied view that the world is constructed by language ...


Art And Androgyny: The Aerialist, Naomi Ritter Aug 1989

Art And Androgyny: The Aerialist, Naomi Ritter

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

Among the many circus performers who have fascinated writers and artists since Romanticism, the clown and the aerialist predominate. In the nineteenth century, the tightrope artiste inspired comparisons with the (self-styled) equally daring and equally craftsmanlike poet. The vertical metaphor suggested a vision of transcendent art that Romantics and their heirs claimed for themselves. In the twentieth century, vestiges of the same identification and transcendence remain, but a new sexual focus appears also. Two important texts by Cocteau and Thomas Mann, "Le Numero de Barbette" (1926) and Chapter 1 in Book III of Felix Krull ( 1951), show the aerial artiste ...


Marilynne Robinson: 02-23-1989, Marilynne Robinson, Stanley Sanvel Rubin Feb 1989

Marilynne Robinson: 02-23-1989, Marilynne Robinson, Stanley Sanvel Rubin

Writers Forum Videos

In an interview conducted on February 23, 1989, Marilynne Robinson reads from her novel Housekeeping and discusses her characters Ruth, Lucille, and Sylvie. She recalls writing the novel while teaching in France, and her youth in the wilderness of Idaho. Other topics include metaphor, consciousness, language in fiction, and the Bill Forsyth film adaptation of her novel.