Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 15 of 15

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Will The Real Mariah Watkins Please Stand Up?: A Case Of Inaccuracy And Marginalization Of African American History And Appearance, Jennifer Farley Gordon, Eulanda A. Sanders Nov 2015

Will The Real Mariah Watkins Please Stand Up?: A Case Of Inaccuracy And Marginalization Of African American History And Appearance, Jennifer Farley Gordon, Eulanda A. Sanders

International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings

Who was Mariah Watkins? What was her identity, and how did appearance inform that identity? Watkins was an African American woman. Although likely born a slave, she lived most of her free years as a woman of property and of skill, working as a documented nurse and midwife in Neosho, Missouri. This paper relies on archival records, photographic analysis, and material culture to explore Watkins as a case study in the challenges of documenting African American appearance during and after the antebellum period in the United States.


Style Through Silk And The Silent Silver Screen: "Irene Castle Corticelli Fashions", Denise Nicole Green, Jennifer Gray Nov 2015

Style Through Silk And The Silent Silver Screen: "Irene Castle Corticelli Fashions", Denise Nicole Green, Jennifer Gray

International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings

This paper explores Irene Castle’s influence on dress reform and ready-to-wear design of the 19teens and early 1920s. We contend that Irene Castle shaped popular ideas about beauty and style, which contributed to dramatic change in women’s appearance in the 1920s. She was also the first film actress to design and promote a self-named fashion line, Irene Castle Corticelli Fashions, a practice that has become commonplace among today’s film celebrities.


Cotton Cloth Trades, Currency Reforms, And Inflations: Korean Experiences Of The Industrial Revolution From 1883 To 1897, Soon-Young Kim, Jung Ha-Brookshire Nov 2015

Cotton Cloth Trades, Currency Reforms, And Inflations: Korean Experiences Of The Industrial Revolution From 1883 To 1897, Soon-Young Kim, Jung Ha-Brookshire

International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings

Koreans were exposed to machine-made cotton cloth through Japan, who was eager to find new marketplaces for her industrial products. Korea signed the Japan-Korea Treaty of 1876, agreeing to open trades. Through this treaty, Korean consumers experienced a flood of foreign industrial products, and these products fundamentally changed Korean society. This research traced the changing patterns of import cotton cloth prices, compared those with domestic cotton and silk cloth and rice [the most basic necessity food item], to understand how Koreans responded to the force of the Industrial Revolution. F


Town And Country Made: The Custom Dress Designs Of Ethel Wallace, 1930-1955, Michael Mamp Nov 2015

Town And Country Made: The Custom Dress Designs Of Ethel Wallace, 1930-1955, Michael Mamp

International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings

Ethel Wallace (1885-1968) was a twentieth century artist who achieved great success with textiles and paintings. New information has emerged regarding Wallace's mid career in New Hope, PA via the acquisition of her personal papers.2 This cache of primary data allowed for the reconstruction of previously missing details regarding Wallace's mid life/career and has been mostly unavailable for research since her death in 1968.


Experience Is Proof: Texts Versus Observation In Eighteenth-Century Italy, Debra Glasberg Gail Aug 2015

Experience Is Proof: Texts Versus Observation In Eighteenth-Century Italy, Debra Glasberg Gail

Early Modern Workshop: Resources in Jewish History

The late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries marked a significant period in the transformation of scientific scholarship. The Latin philosophical tradition’s dominance waned as empirical methods gained credence. University educated men of science began to trust information actually seen and tested more than knowledge contained in books, especially ancient ones. The larger implications of this transformation -- the questioning of the authority of the written word of the Bible and the accompanying narrative of the origins of the universe -- have received significant scholarly attention. The smaller shifts in the way individuals weighed textual and empirical sources of authority, however, has ...


Johan Kemper's (Moses Aaron's) Humble Account: A Rabbi Between Sabbateanism And Christianity, Níels Eggerz Aug 2015

Johan Kemper's (Moses Aaron's) Humble Account: A Rabbi Between Sabbateanism And Christianity, Níels Eggerz

Early Modern Workshop: Resources in Jewish History

Moses Aaron of Krakow, a Sabbatean rabbi, who would later call himself Johan Kemper, chose to convert to Christianity in the summer of 1696. When his mentor, the Lutheran cleric Johann Friedrich Heunisch, brought his mentee's wish before the council of the Free Imperial City of Schweinfurt, Kemper was asked to submit the reasons for his request together with a short autobiography in written form. The outcome was his Humble Account, which appeared in print shorty after Kemper was baptized. A close analysis of Kemper's Humble Account reveals a very subtle yet pronounced anti-Jewish narrative which makes use ...


Illicit Sex And Law In Early-Modern Italian Ghettos, Federica Francesconi Aug 2015

Illicit Sex And Law In Early-Modern Italian Ghettos, Federica Francesconi

Early Modern Workshop: Resources in Jewish History

This presentation explores the changes of attitudes toward illicit sexual relations within the ghetto societies that occurred in Italy between the late seventeenth century and the middle of the eighteenth century, with a specific focus on young Jewish maidservants. It analyzes how Italian Jewish leadership, both lay and rabbinical, acted in regard to the vicissitudes of Jewish women who faced seduction, sexual exploitation, and pregnancy under the Jewish roof. This analysis uses archival sources from both Jewish courts and civic magistracies in the cities of Venice, Mantua, and Modena during the years 1691-1751. Through a combination of paternalism, cohesiveness, innovation ...


The Sabbatean Who Devoured His Son: The Emden-Eibeschütz Controversy And Cannibalism, Shai Alleson-Gerberg Aug 2015

The Sabbatean Who Devoured His Son: The Emden-Eibeschütz Controversy And Cannibalism, Shai Alleson-Gerberg

Early Modern Workshop: Resources in Jewish History

At a time when cannibalism captured European imagination and was used as effective propaganda against the ‘other’ within or elsewhere, as well as a test case for the concept of Natural Law, it is hardly surprising to discover similar rhetoric in internal Jewish discourse of the early modern era. R. Jacob Emden’s halachic writing on the subject of modern medicine and his tenacious battle against Sabbateanism, provide illuminating examples of the use of cannibalistic imagery, as this had crystalised in colonial literature from the new world and in religious polemics on the Eucharist. Emden’s halachic position on the ...


Jewish Space And Spiritual Supremacy In Eighteenth-Century Italy, David Sclar Aug 2015

Jewish Space And Spiritual Supremacy In Eighteenth-Century Italy, David Sclar

Early Modern Workshop: Resources in Jewish History

This primary text, dated 11 October 1720, is taken from a pinkas belonging to the Jewish community of Padua. It concerns the establishment of an eruv hatserot, a boundary covering most of the city in which Jews would be permitted to carry possessions on the Sabbath. References to contemporary eruvin ordinarily appear in responsa literature. Perhaps uniquely, this document provides communal context for the construction of the Padua eruv. In so doing, it sheds light on the social and religious lives of Italian Jewry in the first half of the eighteenth century.

The document’s appearance as a copied text ...


Emw 2015: Continuity And Change In The Jewish Communities Of The Early Eighteenth Century, The Ohio State University Aug 2015

Emw 2015: Continuity And Change In The Jewish Communities Of The Early Eighteenth Century, The Ohio State University

Early Modern Workshop: Resources in Jewish History

Volume 12: Continuity and Change in the Jewish Communities of the Early Eighteenth Century, Ohio State University, Columbus, August 17-19, 2015

The 2015 Early Modern Workshop on “Continuity and Change in the Jewish Communities in the Early Eighteenth Century” was held at Ohio State University.

Between the late seventeenth century and the middle of the eighteenth century, much of European Jewry (and elements within Ottoman Jewry as well) appear to have shifted from a generally traditional and religious way of life to a way of life that embraced non-traditional and/or non-halakhic practices and fashions. There were no great intellectual ...


The Religious Condition Of German Jewries In The First Half Of The 18th Century. Rural And Urban Communities In Comparison, Avi Siluk Aug 2015

The Religious Condition Of German Jewries In The First Half Of The 18th Century. Rural And Urban Communities In Comparison, Avi Siluk

Early Modern Workshop: Resources in Jewish History

This presentation focuses on Jewish attitudes towards non-Jews in the first half of the 18th century as depicted in the travelling journals of Pietist missionaries. If up to that point, interreligious encounter had been a field of interaction between Jewish and Christian scholars, in the 18th century the missionaries began to engage in conversations on faith with Jews of all social strata, genders, ages and educational backgrounds. Such interactions yielded many different forms of individual and communal Jewish reactions. Examining cases of missionary encounters with the large urban Jewry of Frankfurt (Main) and the smaller, rural kehilah of ...


Striking A Pietist Chord: Isaac Wetzlar’S Proposal For The Improvement Of Jewish Society, Rebekka Voß Aug 2015

Striking A Pietist Chord: Isaac Wetzlar’S Proposal For The Improvement Of Jewish Society, Rebekka Voß

Early Modern Workshop: Resources in Jewish History

In 1748/49, Isaac Wetzlar of Celle in Northern Germany completed Libes Briv (Love Letter), a Yiddish proposal for the improvement of Jewish society. In order to initiate exploration of the complex relationship between Central European Judaism and eighteenth-century Pietism selected sources are discussed that concentrate on the links between Libes briv and the contours of German Pietism. These sources demonstrate that Isaac Wetzlar’s Love Letter (edited and translated into English by M. Faierstein) substantially engages the concepts and initiatives encompassed by Pietist missionary efforts to Jews. The diaries of two travelling missionaries from the Institutum Judaicum in Halle ...


The End Of Jewish Democracy In 18th Century Prague, Joshua Teplitsky Aug 2015

The End Of Jewish Democracy In 18th Century Prague, Joshua Teplitsky

Early Modern Workshop: Resources in Jewish History

One intriguing register for considering continuities and changes in Jewish life in the early eighteenth century is the constitution of the autonomous Jewish community, or kehillah. This institution of Jewish self-government was formed at the nexus of the imposition of governments, on the one hand, and Jewish collective investment in the legitimacy and utility of this form of association, on the other..

Although Jewish communal leadership appears to have been determined by elections in the earlier centuries of this period, by the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries an increasing trend towards permanent ruling oligarchies can be discerned. A standing patriciate is ...


Molasses And Marshmallow: Food And Trading In New England Account Books, Pleun Bouricius, Mike Dyer, Lenora Robinson Jun 2015

Molasses And Marshmallow: Food And Trading In New England Account Books, Pleun Bouricius, Mike Dyer, Lenora Robinson

Massachusetts History Conference

Local archivist and historian Lenora Robinson and maritime historian Mike Dyer will lead participants in exploring the workings of eighteenth-and nineteenth-century account books from local general stores and merchants to long distance trade to help us understand what might be on the table in households and how it got there. A primer in using account books for programming – useful and fun!

Moderator:

  • Pleun Bouricius, Director of Grants & Programs, Mass Humanities

Presenters:

  • Mike Dyer, Senior Maritime Historian, New Bedford Whaling Museum
  • Lenora Robinson, Archival Librarian, New Bedford Whaling Museum Research Library


A Howl Of Free Expression: The 1957 Howl Obscenity Trial And Sexual Liberation, Jamie L. Rehlaender Apr 2015

A Howl Of Free Expression: The 1957 Howl Obscenity Trial And Sexual Liberation, Jamie L. Rehlaender

Young Historians Conference

The 1957 “Howl” obscenity trial, which covered the constitutionality of utilizing obscene words in literature, was largely influential in the development of literary free expression in America. This case centered on Allen Ginsberg’s Howl and Other Poems, a work which represented the ideals and culture of the literarily experimental and sexually promiscuous Beat Generation. The expansion of free expression can be discerned through the tolerance of these sexual implications in literature, which is documented throughout the history of sexual suppression in past censorship cases. The victory of the “Howl” obscenity trial was essential for liberating the use of sexual ...