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Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Literature in English, British Isles

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Urban Trenches: War Poetry And The Unreal City Of The Great War In T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, Jeffrey A. Arp Jan 2005

Urban Trenches: War Poetry And The Unreal City Of The Great War In T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, Jeffrey A. Arp

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

T.S. Eliot arrived in continental Europe in the summer of 1914 as a Harvard philosophy student preparing for his Ph.D.: he would spend the war as a banker in London, and would emerge in 1918 as a poet. He was never a soldier - America did not enter until 1917, and he only belatedly attempted to receive a commission in the United States Navy near the war's eventual conclusion a year later- but Eliot experienced the war: as a civilian in wartime London, as a man concerned with the fate of Western culture and history, and as a ...


The Space Between: Sexual Ambiguity And Magical Realism In Virginia Woolf's Orlando And Jeanette Winterson's The Passion, Megan Rebekah Campbell Jan 2000

The Space Between: Sexual Ambiguity And Magical Realism In Virginia Woolf's Orlando And Jeanette Winterson's The Passion, Megan Rebekah Campbell

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Virginia Woolfs Orlando (1928) and Jeanette Winterson's The Passion (1987), though separated by both fifty-nine years and the critical gulf of modernism and postmodemism, share many traits, not the least of which is a tendency to be taken less than seriously by readers and critics. An aura of lovely frivolity surrounds both novels, in some ways quite literally, as Nigel Nicolson's flattering yet reductive assessment of Orlando as "the longest and most charming love letter in literature" appears on the cover of many editions. The Passion bears its own scarlet letter-like summation, as its cover, courtesy of Edmund ...


Verbal And Visual Intertexts: An Approach To Analyzing And Teaching Two Novels By Charlotte Bronte, Kristy M. Hinz Jan 1998

Verbal And Visual Intertexts: An Approach To Analyzing And Teaching Two Novels By Charlotte Bronte, Kristy M. Hinz

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

It is truly awe-inspiring to realize how much of Charlotte Bronte's own dreams and life can be found on the pages of her novels. Many elements in Bronte's life did not occur as she would have wished; for that reason, she lives out many of her fondest dreams through the protagonists of her novels. Bronte's writing also includes references to other writers, genres, and methods that reflect her preferences and choices in life. All of these elements appear as intertexts; therefore, this study explores what Julia Kristeva defines as intrapsychic or auto(bio)graphic traces in two ...


Draining Life Forces: Vampirism In Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, Julie A. Thilmany Jan 1998

Draining Life Forces: Vampirism In Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, Julie A. Thilmany

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Rarely did authors of the nineteenth century choose to make their vampires female. Joseph Sheridan LeFanu's "Carmilla," first published in 1872, is credited as being the first " ... to break with the tradition of the literary vampire as a Byronic figure by creating a woman vampire". Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights, however, presents an interesting argument against this claim that LeFanu created the first female vampire in English literature. In Wuthering Heights, first published in 1847, 25 years before "Carmilla," Bronte created her own female vampire in the character of Catherine Earnshaw Linton. This creation of the female vampire provided ...


Rupert Brooke: 'An Organized Chance Of Living Again', Tracy Charity Schoenle Jan 1997

Rupert Brooke: 'An Organized Chance Of Living Again', Tracy Charity Schoenle

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Rupert Brooke wrote to his friend Jacques Raverat in 1909 of "The great essential thing ... the Organized Chance of Living Again: The SCHEME" a proposal that he and some chosen friends would meet on May 1, 1933, at Basle Station, Switzerland to escape the boredom of middle age by performing a disappearing act of sorts. Dead to the world left behind, they would instead embrace a new life:

... We'll show the grey unbelieving age ... that there's a better Heaven than the pale serene Anglican windless harmonium-buzzing Eternity of the Christians, a Heaven in Time, now and for ever ...


Sasha And Antoinette: Jean Rhys's Orphans In The Patriarchy, Katherine Marie Mcdonald Jan 1997

Sasha And Antoinette: Jean Rhys's Orphans In The Patriarchy, Katherine Marie Mcdonald

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

They sought to be lifted out of "their class as women without the power to hold onto the ones with power: their father, their brothers, the boss" (Abbott 112). "They" are novelist Jean Rhys's characters, women who, like Rhys herself, lived in London and Paris between the World Wars. During this era Rhys published four novels: Postures (published in 1928; published in the United States under the title Quartet}, After Leaving Mr. MacKenzie (published in 1931), Voyage in the Dark (published in 1934), and Good Morning. Midnight (published in 1939).


"Could Someone Else's Hand Have Sawn That Trunk And Dragged The Frame Away?": Laudy Audley's Secret As A Revision Of Homer's Odyssey, Charles Andrew Rybak Jan 1994

"Could Someone Else's Hand Have Sawn That Trunk And Dragged The Frame Away?": Laudy Audley's Secret As A Revision Of Homer's Odyssey, Charles Andrew Rybak

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Mary Elizabeth Braddon' s Lady Audley' s Secret (1861) is a novel that has been largely marginalized by the critical community. This marginalization is seen in the scarcity of articles dedicated to Braddon, and the tendency to quickly label her work as "detective" or "sensational" fiction. And while these generic elements are definitely worth recognizing, one needs to look no further than the Select Bibliography in the Oxford edition to find the pigeon hole Braddon' s work has been placed in. I believe that Braddon was working with much more artistic range than the "melodrama" she is given credit for ...


A Taxonomy Of The Female Private Detective In Contemporary Literature, Michele Marie Regenold Jan 1992

A Taxonomy Of The Female Private Detective In Contemporary Literature, Michele Marie Regenold

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

The name Sherlock Holmes is nearly synonymous with the word detective for many people due to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's vastly popular ratiocinative detective stories. However, Edgar Allan Poe is considered the author of the first ratiocinative or classical detective story in the 1840s. Poe introduced and Doyle masterfully articulated the classical detective formula while writers such as Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers continued the classical tradition well into the twentieth century (Cawelti 80).


Rhetorical Analysis Of Frances Burney's Evelina And Select Journal Entries, Kerry Lynn Walter Jan 1992

Rhetorical Analysis Of Frances Burney's Evelina And Select Journal Entries, Kerry Lynn Walter

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

The first issue discussed in Burney scholarship--and dealt with in this work--has to do with her importance as a novelist and as a diarist. Margaret Arme !body notes in her Frances Burney: The Life in the Works that Burney's fame (in the twentieth century) has been "to a large extent that not of a novelist but of a diarist" ( 1). The novels, often similar in style 'and content to the journals, have been treated as less important or less impressive than the journals. !body writes the biography partly as a way of counteracting "the popularity of the diary material ...


The Woman Question In Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre: The Interaction Of Romanticism And Mid-Nineteenth-Century Victorian England, Hsiu-Sui Chang Jan 1992

The Woman Question In Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre: The Interaction Of Romanticism And Mid-Nineteenth-Century Victorian England, Hsiu-Sui Chang

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Near the end of the twentieth century, various and even contradictory literary criticisms are available. Which one is best for interpretation? Specifically, which one is best for interpreting Jane Eyre? The answers vary. Terry Eagleton, for example, declares that "there are indeed Marxist and feminist theories of literature which ... are more valuable" since his hypothesis ts that "literature . . . is vitally engaged with the living situations of men and women: it is concrete rather than abstract". What he means is that literature occurs in a social context.


Much More Than A Voice: Literary Symbolism And The Voice In Heart Of Darkness, Patricia Sue Fitch Jan 1991

Much More Than A Voice: Literary Symbolism And The Voice In Heart Of Darkness, Patricia Sue Fitch

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

This essay deals with literary Symbolism and Joseph Conrad 's novel, Heart of Darkness. One aim of this work is to define Symbolism by providing a brief history of the movement and by briefly exploring the ideas of those writers who are considered to be part of the movement. A second is to consider some ideas about the literary symbol itself. This defining literary Symbolism and the literary Symbol and discussing Conrad's use of language and the Symbol will eventually lead to an examination of Heart of Darkness and its use of voice to reveal this text as ...


Othello And The Question Of Race: A Review Of Two Decades Of Criticism, Azmil M. Zabidi Jan 1990

Othello And The Question Of Race: A Review Of Two Decades Of Criticism, Azmil M. Zabidi

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

No abstract provided.


The Subversion Of The Romantic Paradigm In Three Of The Novels Of Barbara Pym, Alane D. Fitzgerald Jan 1988

The Subversion Of The Romantic Paradigm In Three Of The Novels Of Barbara Pym, Alane D. Fitzgerald

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

The novels of British writer Barbara Pym (1913-1980) have been praised for their wit, gentle humor, and quiet portrayals of ordinary men and women who are given to musing upon the ways in which their mundane lives have not quite met their expectations. Most of her ten novels deal with the poignancy of day-to-day living rather than major social crises and personal upheaval. Small triumphs and minor setbacks are Pym's bailiwick. She has been seen (with some justification) as a kind of heir to Jane Austen in her treatment of the ritualized comedy of manners. Like Austen, Pym is ...


Marxism: Not David Storey's Cup Of Tea, Tien-Ti Wang Jan 1983

Marxism: Not David Storey's Cup Of Tea, Tien-Ti Wang

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

By common acknowledgement the revolution in the history of modern English drama came with John Osborne's Look Back in Anger, first seen at the Royal Court Theatre, London, in May 1956. British plays in the past, according to Henry Popkin, showed "mainly the upper and upper-middle classes... When some serious emotional crisis arose, their special concern was always to show their good taste and breeding by refusing to express their emotions." Look Back in Anger impressed the critics mainly because of "the outspokenness of its language, its open criticism of establishment values, and its articulate, thoughtful working-class hero." The ...


The Supernatural In Popular Gothic Romance, Pamela Partch Mehl Jan 1978

The Supernatural In Popular Gothic Romance, Pamela Partch Mehl

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Over the last two centuries, the gothic romance has proven to be one of the most enduring of fictional formulas because it combines specific cultural perceptions with the more universal story of romance, thus allowing for large numbers of books to be produced which repeat the same basic elements. The gothic romance, as a fictional formula, also provides a means for making inferences about the cultural perceptions of a large group of people and for identifying differences in these perceptions from one cultural period to another. In discussing the changes or variations in one of the formula's elements—the ...


Character Development In The Novels Of Evelyn Waugh, Jane Elizabeth Neff Jan 1972

Character Development In The Novels Of Evelyn Waugh, Jane Elizabeth Neff

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

When asked if his works were satiric, Evelyn Waugh promptly replied, "No. Satire is a matter of period. It flourishes in a stable society and pre-supposes homogeneous moral standards--the early Roman Empire and 18th-Century Europe. It is aimed at inconsistency and hypocrisy. It exposes polite cruelty and folly by exaggerating them. All this has no place in the Century of the Common Man where vice no longer pays lip service to virtue." In spite of his ardent denial, Waugh was a highly articulate satirist. Referring to Waugh's comment, Paul Doyle has noted that "in its way this is Waugh ...


A Study Of Aspects Of Gwyn Thomas's Humor, Pearl Zinober Jan 1970

A Study Of Aspects Of Gwyn Thomas's Humor, Pearl Zinober

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

From the Welsh mountains, with their coal, chapels, and choruses, came Gwyn Thomas. He was born in 1913 in Porth, deep in the Rhondda Valley of South Wales, and was reared there in the harsh years of the strikes of the twenties and the Great Depression of the thirties. This environment, which shaped his thinking through the long, calamitous years, is reflected in Thomas's own view of his writing.