Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

University of Massachusetts Amherst

Morphology

1999

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Review Of Iggy Roca (Ed.) (1997) Derivations And Constraints In Phonology, John J. Mccarthy Jan 1999

Review Of Iggy Roca (Ed.) (1997) Derivations And Constraints In Phonology, John J. Mccarthy

Linguistics Department Faculty Publication Series

No abstract provided.


Sympathy And Phonological Opacity, John J. Mccarthy Jan 1999

Sympathy And Phonological Opacity, John J. Mccarthy

Linguistics Department Faculty Publication Series

This paper explores the nature of phonological opacity (in the sense of Kiparsky 1971, 1973) within Optimality Theory. Previous attempts to address opacity in OT are discussed and a novel proposal, an inter-candidate faithfulness relation called 'sympathy', is offered. Specific applications of sympathy are presented and some general results are derived about counter-bleeding, counter-feeding, multi-process, and Duke-of-York opaque interactions.


Reduplication With Fixed Segmentism, John J. Mccarthy, John Alderete, Jill Beckman, Laura Benua, Amalia Gnanadesikan, Suzanne Urbanczyk Jan 1999

Reduplication With Fixed Segmentism, John J. Mccarthy, John Alderete, Jill Beckman, Laura Benua, Amalia Gnanadesikan, Suzanne Urbanczyk

Linguistics Department Faculty Publication Series

Fixed segmentism is the phenomenon whereby a reduplicative morpheme contains segments that are invariant rather than copied. We investigate it within Optimality Theory, arguing that it falls into two distinct types, phonological and morphological. Phonological fixed segmentism is analyzed under the OT rubric of emergence of the unmarked. It therefore has significant connections to markedness theory, sharing properties with other domains where markedness is relevant and showing context-dependence. In contrast, morphological fixed segmentism is a kind of affixation, and so it resembles affixing morphology generally. The two types are contrasted, and claims about impossible patterns of fixed segmentism are developed.


Faithfulness And Identity In Prosodic Morphology, John J. Mccarthy, Alan Prince Jan 1999

Faithfulness And Identity In Prosodic Morphology, John J. Mccarthy, Alan Prince

Linguistics Department Faculty Publication Series

This article is largely based on the more extensive study McCarthy & Prince (1995), but includes significant further analysis of the typology of reduplication-phonology interactions and new discussion of the connection between base-reduplicant identity and Generalized Template Theory (McCarthy & Prince 1994), which eliminates the template as a unitary linguistic object.

Base-reduplicant Identity is accomplished through the same formal types of constraints as input-output Faithfulness, via the theory of correspondence (McCarthy & Prince 1994, 1995), which provides a general means of regulating similarity between linguistic representations. Phenomena described as over- and under-application, where base-reduplicant identity effects come in conflict with and over-ride otherwise ...


Distinctive Features, John J. Mccarthy Jan 1999

Distinctive Features, John J. Mccarthy

Linguistics Department Faculty Publication Series

No abstract provided.