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University of Massachusetts Amherst

Morphology

Linguistics Department Faculty Publication Series

1994

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

The Emergence Of The Unmarked: Optimality In Prosodic Morphology, John J. Mccarthy, Alan Prince Jan 1994

The Emergence Of The Unmarked: Optimality In Prosodic Morphology, John J. Mccarthy, Alan Prince

Linguistics Department Faculty Publication Series

This paper identifies and illustrates a key consequence of Optimality Theory called 'emergence of the unmarked'. In OT, a constraint can be active even if it is crucially dominated. A low-ranking markedness constraint, then, can decide between candidates, as long as they tie on all higher-ranking constraints. The linguistic structure that is unmarked with respect to this constraint can emerge in such circumstances.

This notion is applied to a core problem in the theory of Prosodic Morphology, that of defining templates. The frequently encountered minimal-word template is shown to emerge from markedness constraints on prosodic structure.


Two Lectures On Prosodic Morphology, John J. Mccarthy, Alan Prince Jan 1994

Two Lectures On Prosodic Morphology, John J. Mccarthy, Alan Prince

Linguistics Department Faculty Publication Series

No abstract provided.


Prosodic Morphology, John J. Mccarthy, Alan Prince Jan 1994

Prosodic Morphology, John J. Mccarthy, Alan Prince

Linguistics Department Faculty Publication Series

An overview of results in the theory of prosodic morphology.


Nonconcatenative Morphology, John J. Mccarthy Jan 1994

Nonconcatenative Morphology, John J. Mccarthy

Linguistics Department Faculty Publication Series

No abstract provided.


The Phonetics And Phonology Of Semitic Pharyngeals, John J. Mccarthy Jan 1994

The Phonetics And Phonology Of Semitic Pharyngeals, John J. Mccarthy

Linguistics Department Faculty Publication Series

The guttural segments of the Semitic languages form a natural class.