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University of Massachusetts Amherst

East Asian Languages and Societies

Asian literature

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Hearing Voices: Female Transmission Of Memories In Okinawan Literature In The 1970s And 1980s, Erumi Honda Jan 2010

Hearing Voices: Female Transmission Of Memories In Okinawan Literature In The 1970s And 1980s, Erumi Honda

Masters Theses 1911 - February 2014

In this thesis, using Ōshiro Tatsuhiro’s “Meiro” (Maze, 1991) and Nakandakari Hatsu’s “Hahatachi onnatachi” (Mothers/Women, 1984) as primary sources, I have pursued two main questions about postwar Okinawan literature: the question of how memory is transmitted, along gender lines, about a traumatic past through the generations and the question of yuta operating as transmitters, mediators, and anchors of cultural identity under the threat of foreign influence.

Both “Maze” and “Mothers/Women” address the issue of postwar Okinawan identity in the face of an influx of new ideas and practices by portraying Okinawan women’s struggle to find ...


Mirrors On The Walls, Eyes In The Sky, Derek Petrarca Jan 2009

Mirrors On The Walls, Eyes In The Sky, Derek Petrarca

Masters Theses 1911 - February 2014

Thirteen assorted fairy tales by early 20th century Japanese poet/author Miyazawa Kenji, collected and translated with an analytical introduction by the translator. The introduction explores the presence of "the agent of the outside" in the majority of the author's work and how this literary concept serves to encourage the reader to escape subjective viewpoints.


Tainted Gender: Sexual Impurity And Women In Kankyo No Tomo, Yuko Mizue Jan 2009

Tainted Gender: Sexual Impurity And Women In Kankyo No Tomo, Yuko Mizue

Masters Theses 1911 - February 2014

This thesis consists of research on women and Buddhism in light of a medieval Japanese Buddhist tales collection called Kankyo no Tomo. This collection reveals the predicament in which women in medieval Japan found themselves. As the focus of sexual desire (towards them and by them), they were also inherently polluted due to their connection with blood (kegare).