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Bioethics

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Caritas In Communion: Theological Foundations Of Catholic Health Care, M. Lysaught May 2014

Caritas In Communion: Theological Foundations Of Catholic Health Care, M. Lysaught

M. Therese Lysaught

No abstract provided.


Eight Is Enough?: The Ethics Of The California Octuplets Case, Scott Paeth Oct 2012

Eight Is Enough?: The Ethics Of The California Octuplets Case, Scott Paeth

Scott R. Paeth

The recent California octuplets case raises a number of important issues that need to be addressed in the context of the increasingly widespread practice of in vitro fertilization. This paper explores some of those issues as looked at from the perspective of protestant theological ethics and public theology, examining the moral responsibilities of the various participants in the process, both before and after the octuplets’ birth, including the mother, her doctors, the health care bureaucracy, the wider society, and the media. Each of these participants failed in significant respects to consider the ethical implications of the births in this complicated ...


Corporations, Cros And Globalized Biomedical Research: Is Belmont Obsolete?, M Lysaught Mar 2012

Corporations, Cros And Globalized Biomedical Research: Is Belmont Obsolete?, M Lysaught

M. Therese Lysaught

Christian and Jewish theologians and philosophers were key figures in shaping the normative principles for human subjects research (HSR). Yet since the publishing of the federal regulations governing HSR in 1981, HSR per se has received little theological attention. This is particularly anomalous given that 1980 marks a turning-point in HSR, as it moved from an enterprise circumscribed within a physician-researcher/patient-subject model to its current infrastructure as a multi-billion dollar global industry. This shift requires rethinking the philosophical and theological structure of research ethics. In particular, it requires that research ethics theorize both economics and the new agents of ...


Corporeality And The Corporation: The Duty To Participate In Biomedical Research As Biopolitics, M Lysaught Mar 2012

Corporeality And The Corporation: The Duty To Participate In Biomedical Research As Biopolitics, M Lysaught

M. Therese Lysaught

Over the past three decades, an enormous transformation has occurred in the political economy of biomedical research. Since the promulgation of the Belmont framework and the Federal guidelines, human subjects research has become a commodified enterprise governed by the principles of neoliberal economics, in the words of Jill Fisher, "a full-fledged industry with a global presence." This economic transformation has been accompanied by a dizzying increase in the numbers of human bodies now subjected to biomedical research. In spite of these economic and numerical realities, some claim that persons have a duty or moral obligation to enroll as human subjects ...


Corporations, Cros And Profit: Ethics In The New Bio-Political Economy Of Globalized Biomedical Research, M Lysaught Mar 2012

Corporations, Cros And Profit: Ethics In The New Bio-Political Economy Of Globalized Biomedical Research, M Lysaught

M. Therese Lysaught

A main catalyst in the emergence of the bioethics was the abuse of human subjects. Theologians were key in shaping the normative principles for human subjects research (HSR). Yet, while HSR in 2009 differs dramatically from its shape in the 1960s and 1970s, changes which have occurred over the past two decades have received little theological analysis. This paper will consider the globalization of HSR to map the myriad challenges that the global, economic, industrial infrastructure of HSR presents to the standard principles of research ethics. Particular attention will be paid to the nature of the new agent of HSR-the ...


Respect: Or, How Respect For Persons Became Respect For Autonomy, M. Therese Lysaught Oct 2004

Respect: Or, How Respect For Persons Became Respect For Autonomy, M. Therese Lysaught

M. Therese Lysaught

This article provides an intellectual archeology of how the term “respect” has functioned in the field of bioethics. I argue that over time the function of the term has shifted, with a significant turning point occurring in 1979. Prior to 1979, the term “respect” connoted primarily the notion of “respect for persons” which functioned as an umbrella which conferred protection to autonomous persons and those with compromised autonomy. But in 1979, with the First Edition of Principles of Biomedical Ethics by Beauchamp and Childress, and the report of the Ethical Advisory Board (EAB) of the (then) Department of Health, Education ...