Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 20 of 20

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

Online Advertising: Examining The Content And Messages Within Websites Targeted At Children, Lisa Kervin, Sandra C. Jones, Jessica Mantei Jan 2012

Online Advertising: Examining The Content And Messages Within Websites Targeted At Children, Lisa Kervin, Sandra C. Jones, Jessica Mantei

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

It is recognised that from a young age children spend considerable portions of their leisure time on the Internet. In Australia a number of child-targeted magazines have associated websites, which have high and ever-increasing readership. We do not yet know the impact of this medium upon children. Overt advertising is evident on webpages, but so too are hidden advertisements in the written text, images and games. This material usually does not comply with existing broadcasting codes of practice for mainstream advertising. This article examines the instances of overt and covert advertisements for food within three websites monitored over a 12-month ...


Disease Awareness Advertising: Women's Intentions Following Exposure, Danika Hall, Sandra C. Jones, Donald C. Iverson Jan 2011

Disease Awareness Advertising: Women's Intentions Following Exposure, Danika Hall, Sandra C. Jones, Donald C. Iverson

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Background: In Australia, where direct to consumer advertising of prescription medicines is prohibited, pharmaceutical companies can sponsor disease awareness advertising targeting consumers. This study examined the impact of disease awareness advertising exposure on older women's reported behavioural intentions. Method: Women were approached in a shopping centre and randomly assigned mock advertisements for two health conditions. Disease information and sponsors were manipulated. Results: Two hundred and forty-one women responded to 466 advertisements. Almost half reported an intention to ask their doctor for a prescription or referral as a result of seeing the advertisement, but more reported they would talk to ...


Sex And Sexism In Australian Alcohol Advertising: (Why) Are Women More Offended Than Men?, Sandra C. Jones, A Reid Jan 2011

Sex And Sexism In Australian Alcohol Advertising: (Why) Are Women More Offended Than Men?, Sandra C. Jones, A Reid

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Alcohol advertisements often attract criticism for portraying women in an overtly sexual and demeaning fashion, with past research finding that women are more critical than men. The first study reported here found that neither feminism nor gender role identity added substantial explanatory power beyond that of gender. Females reported more negative attitudes toward ads that used demeaning sexual appeals and more positive attitudes toward empowering appeals. The second study provided quantitative evidence in support of the assumption that it is offensive sexual portrayals, rather than other aspects of sexist advertisements, that are disliked.


Exposure To Alcohol Advertising And Alcohol Consumption Among Australian Adolescents, Sandra C. Jones, Christopher A. Magee Jan 2011

Exposure To Alcohol Advertising And Alcohol Consumption Among Australian Adolescents, Sandra C. Jones, Christopher A. Magee

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Aims: Underage drinking is a major problem in Australia and may be influenced by exposure to alcohol advertising. The objective of the present study was to collect data on 12 17 year old Australian adolescents' exposure to different types of alcohol advertising and examine the association between exposure to advertising and alcohol consumption. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 1113 adolescents aged 12 17 years recruited with a variety of methods to gain a cross-section of participants across metropolitan, regional and rural New South Wales (including independent schools, mall intercepts and online). Participants answered a series of questions assessing adolescents' exposure ...


Toddler Milk Advertising In Australia: The Infant Formula Ads We Have When We Don’T Have Infant Formula Ads, Nina J. Berry, Sandra Jones, Donald Iverson Jan 2010

Toddler Milk Advertising In Australia: The Infant Formula Ads We Have When We Don’T Have Infant Formula Ads, Nina J. Berry, Sandra Jones, Donald Iverson

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

The Marketing in Australia of Infant Formula: Manufacturers’ and Importers’ Agreement (MAIF) prevents manufacturers and importers from advertising infant formula. However, toddler milks, which share brand identities with infant formula, are advertised freely; and recent research suggests consumers fail to distinguish between advertising for infant formula and for toddler milk. This study examined whether Australian parents recalled having seen advertisements for ‘formula’. Most respondents (66.8%) reported seeing an advertisement for infant formula, with those who had only seen non-retail advertising more than twice as likely to believe that they had seen such an advertisement as those who had only ...


'Most Men Drink... Especially Like When They Play Sports' - Alcohol Advertising During Sporting Broadcasts And The Potential Impact On Child Audiences, Sandra C. Jones, Lyn Phillipson, Lance R. Barrie Jan 2010

'Most Men Drink... Especially Like When They Play Sports' - Alcohol Advertising During Sporting Broadcasts And The Potential Impact On Child Audiences, Sandra C. Jones, Lyn Phillipson, Lance R. Barrie

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Alcohol advertising during sporting broadcasts, as well as the sponsorship of sporting events by the alcohol industry, is common practice in Australia, as in many other countries. The strength of the association between alcohol and sports prompts consideration of the potential for children who watch televised sport to be exposed to a considerable amount of alcohol advertising, and to learn to associate alcohol with sport and sporting success. This paper reviews the current alcohol advertising regulations in Australia, particularly in reference to the protection of children. It then details a pair of studies designed to examine the extent and nature ...


The Use Of Female Sexuality In Australian Alcohol Advertising: Public Policy Implications Of Young Adults' Reactions To Stereotypes, Sandra C. Jones, Amanda Reid Jan 2010

The Use Of Female Sexuality In Australian Alcohol Advertising: Public Policy Implications Of Young Adults' Reactions To Stereotypes, Sandra C. Jones, Amanda Reid

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Coinciding with the rise of raunch culture, a new female stereotype has emerged in advertising - the lusty, busty exhibitionist who exudes sexual power and confidence. Previous research has generally found that women react less positively to female sexual images in alcohol advertising than males, but different sexual stereotypes have not been explicitly examined. The present study utilizes different types of sexual appeals in three televised advertisements for alcohol brands and investigates the relationship between types of sexual imagery and attitude to the advertisement, stated reasons for (dis)liking the advertisement and purchase intention (PI) among 268 Australian university students. Surprisingly ...


Whose Standards? An Examination Of Community Attitudes Towards Australian Advertising, Sandra C. Jones, Katherine Eagleton Jan 2009

Whose Standards? An Examination Of Community Attitudes Towards Australian Advertising, Sandra C. Jones, Katherine Eagleton

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

There is considerable ongoing debate in Australia, as in other countries, about the ethicality of current advertising practices. In recent years there has been an increase in the public focus on offensive or unacceptable advertising – such as overt sex appeals, racial vilification, and promotion of unsafe use of consumer products – arguing that many of these advertisements (ads) are contrary to community standards. The industry, on the other hand, argues that it produces ads that are designed to meet and appeal to community standards. There is no comprehensive data on the nature of community standards in relation to advertising, and the ...


Industry Partnerships For Health Nonprofits And Disease Awareness Advertising, Danika Hall, Sandra C. Jones, Donald C. Iverson Jan 2009

Industry Partnerships For Health Nonprofits And Disease Awareness Advertising, Danika Hall, Sandra C. Jones, Donald C. Iverson

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Marketing partnerships between non-profit organisations (NPOs) and industry generally bring favourable results for both parties (Brønn and Vrioni 2001; Varadarajan and Menon 1988). However, there is some scepticism about corporate exploitation of such arrangements and growing concern in Australia and elsewhere about partnerships between the pharmaceutical industry and NPOs (Angell 2006; Moynihan and Cassels 2005) and the co-sponsorship of Disease Awareness Advertising (DAA). This paper reports the findings from a study of how Australian women respond to DAA with differing sponsors including their ability to identify, and their attitude toward, the sponsor. The results are of importance for health NPOs ...


Amplified Voices, But They Are Speaking To The Wrong People. Why The Complaint System For Unacceptable Advertising In Australia Is Not Working, Katherine Eagleton, Sandra C. Jones Jan 2008

Amplified Voices, But They Are Speaking To The Wrong People. Why The Complaint System For Unacceptable Advertising In Australia Is Not Working, Katherine Eagleton, Sandra C. Jones

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This exploratory study highlights the lack of public awareness of the role of the Advertising Standards Board (ASB) in the process of handling complaints about unacceptable advertising in Australia. Results show that only a small proportion of Australian adults know that the ASB are the appropriate complaints handling body. This lack of awareness is evident even among those who have made a complaint about advertising (generally to a less appropriate body). This highlights the need for an education campaign to inform the general public how to make a complaint about inappropriate advertising, and who to make a complaint to. Empowering ...


The Commercial Food Landscape: Outdoor Food Advertising Around Primary Schools In Australia, Bridget P. Kelly, Michelle Cretikos, Kris Rogers, Lesley King Jan 2008

The Commercial Food Landscape: Outdoor Food Advertising Around Primary Schools In Australia, Bridget P. Kelly, Michelle Cretikos, Kris Rogers, Lesley King

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Objective: Food marketing is linked to childhood obesity through its influence on children’s food preferences, purchase requests and food consumption. We aimed to describe the volume and nature of outdoor food advertisements and factors associated with outdoor food advertising in the area surrounding Australian primary schools. Methods: Forty primary schools in Sydney and Wollongong were selected using random sampling within population density and socio-economic strata. The area within a 500m radius of each school was scanned and advertisements coded according to pre-defined criteria, including: food or non-food product advertisement, distance from the school, size and location. Food advertisements were ...


Health Claims And Food Advertising: Comparison Of Marketing And Nutrition Experts' Ratings Of Magazine Advertisements, Sandra C. Jones, Peter Williams, Linda C. Tapsell, Kelly L. Andrews Jan 2008

Health Claims And Food Advertising: Comparison Of Marketing And Nutrition Experts' Ratings Of Magazine Advertisements, Sandra C. Jones, Peter Williams, Linda C. Tapsell, Kelly L. Andrews

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

To determine the nature and differences in expert opinion from the fields of nutrition and marketing on the use of health claims in the 30 most frequently appearing Australian magazine food advertisements, a survey was conducted with 28 nutritionists and 21 marketing experts in Australia and New Zealand. The experts assessed the advertisements with respect to the accuracy of the nutrition claims, the tactics and intentions of the advertising strategy and the accessibility of the nutrition information to lay consumers. Of 28 advertisements where a claim was identified, for only one did more than 90% believe the claim to be ...


Non-Advertising Alcohol Promotions In Licensed Premises: Does The Code Of Practice Ensure Responsible Promotion Of Alcohol?, Sandra C. Jones, Melissa Lynch Jan 2007

Non-Advertising Alcohol Promotions In Licensed Premises: Does The Code Of Practice Ensure Responsible Promotion Of Alcohol?, Sandra C. Jones, Melissa Lynch

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Introduction and Aims. Binge drinking is a major public health issue in Australia, particularly among young people. There has been a considerable focus on alcohol advertising, among both researchers and policy makers, resulting in efforts to bring about some level of regulation of unacceptable advertising practices. However - despite the existence of a Code of Practice for Responsible Promotion of Liquor Products which provides 'a framework of practices which are considered acceptable and reasonable' for licensed premises - there are few, if any, data on the nature and extent of promotions which could arguably fall under either 'acceptable' or 'unacceptable' practices. Design ...


Health Claims For Food Made In Australian Magazine Advertisements, P. G. Williams, Linda C. Tapsell, Sandra C. Jones, K. Mcconville Jan 2007

Health Claims For Food Made In Australian Magazine Advertisements, P. G. Williams, Linda C. Tapsell, Sandra C. Jones, K. Mcconville

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Aim: The aim was to describe the level of health claims being used in magazine advertisements, the categories of foods carrying health claims and the types of benefits being claimed for particular foods or food ingredients. Data were compared to similar studies of food labels and internet sites to reflect the impact of rule governance of the different media and highlight implications for the current proposed changes in food standards legislation. Methods: From January to June 2005 a survey of all print advertisements for food in Australia’s 30 top-selling magazines was undertaken. The results were compared with those from ...


Television Food Advertising To Children: The Extent And Nature Of Exposure, Bridget P. Kelly, Ben J. Smith, Lesley King, Victoria M. Flood, Adrian Bauman Jan 2007

Television Food Advertising To Children: The Extent And Nature Of Exposure, Bridget P. Kelly, Ben J. Smith, Lesley King, Victoria M. Flood, Adrian Bauman

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Objective: To describe the pattern and prevalence of food and drink advertisements to children on commercial television in Sydney, Australia, and compare these with advertising regulations set out in the Children’s Television Standards and results from a similar study in 2002. Design: Data were collected by recording television from 06.00 hours until 23.00 hours on all three commercial channels from Sunday 14 May 2006 to Saturday 20 May 2006 (357 h). The study analysed advertisements in two children’s viewing periods, one as defined in the 2002 study and the other according to current standards. Food advertisements ...


The Effects Of Different Regulation Systems On Television Food Advertising To Children, Bridget P. Kelly, Lesley King, Adrian Bauman, Ben J. Smith, Victoria M. Flood Jan 2007

The Effects Of Different Regulation Systems On Television Food Advertising To Children, Bridget P. Kelly, Lesley King, Adrian Bauman, Ben J. Smith, Victoria M. Flood

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Objective: The aim of this study was to model children’s potential exposure to television food advertisements under different regulatory scenarios to demonstrate the policy implications of regulatory change in Australia. Methods: Television advertising data was collected from Sydney commercial television channels from 14-20 May 2006. Extrapolating from these data, the patterns of food advertising under four regulatory scenarios were examined, including arrangements restricting the content, volume and timing of advertisements. Results: Each scenario resulted in a reduction of total and non-core food advertisements. The scenario to restrict non-core food advertisements during the major viewing period (7:00-20:30) led ...


Survey Of Health Claims For Australian Foods Made On Internet Sites, H. Dragicevich, P. G. Williams, L. Ridges Sep 2006

Survey Of Health Claims For Australian Foods Made On Internet Sites, H. Dragicevich, P. G. Williams, L. Ridges

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Aim: Australia and New Zealand are currently preparing a new food standard code, which will allow the use of health claims on food products and in associated advertising. The aim of this study was to obtain preliminary information about the current use of health claims on the Internet and the level of compliance of these claims with existing regulations. Methods: From August to October 2005 a survey was conducted of 1068 websites associated with the top 20 food processing companies in Australia, and an additional 683 websites for food products found to carry health claims in previous studies of product ...


Ordnance, Five Hats And Constantinople: Benjamin, Gustafsson And Lubitsch, Jon Cockburn Aug 2006

Ordnance, Five Hats And Constantinople: Benjamin, Gustafsson And Lubitsch, Jon Cockburn

Faculty of Creative Arts - Papers (Archive)

This paper concentrates on identifying intellectual, cinematic and commercial representations of the efficiency movement as embodied in the emergent mechanical-flâneuse (the term is an obvious combination of the adjective ‘mechanical’, as a Taylorist/Fordist signifier, with the noun ‘flâneuse’, which is a gender inversion of the masculine flâneur: the metropolitan wanderer profiled in Benjamin’s re-examination of Baudelaire and 19th century Paris). To articulate these representations of the ‘new’ woman, under the influence of Americanism in post-1918 Europe, this paper focuses on two passages in Benjamin’s One Way Street. Benjamin’s passages are then read in juxtaposition to advertisements ...


Australian Industry Responses To Current Ethical Dilemmas – Fast Cars And Fast Food, Sandra C. Jones Jan 2005

Australian Industry Responses To Current Ethical Dilemmas – Fast Cars And Fast Food, Sandra C. Jones

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This paper reviews two ethical dilemmas currently facing advertisers in Australia, which have resulted from lobby group activities and public concern over health and safety issues, and discusses industry responses to these dilemmas. In Australia the main response mechanism for advertisers has been the introduction of self-regulatory codes of practice. A review of the general and trade press, and of the records of the Australian Advertising Standards Board, finds that industry responses tend to be based on teleological ethics (focus on the ends) rather than deontological ethics (focus on the means), with the primary teleological motive being to avoid deleterious ...


Are Negative Reactions To Sexist Appeals In Alcohol Advertisements A Function Of Feminism Or Gender?, Sandra C. Jones Jan 2005

Are Negative Reactions To Sexist Appeals In Alcohol Advertisements A Function Of Feminism Or Gender?, Sandra C. Jones

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Anecdotal evidence suggests that the use of sexual appeals in alcohol advertising is increasing. It has been shown that the use of sex appeals may result in a more negative attitude towards the brand, particularly among female consumers. This study investigates the proposition that this is the effect of feminist ideology rather than, or in addition to, biological gender. The results show that female respondents have more negative attitudes towards alcohol advertisements utilizing overt (or demeaning) sexual appeals than males and more positive attitudes towards alcohol advertisements utilizing feminist (empowering) appeals than males; and that there is no consistent independent ...