Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Arts and Humanities Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

American Studies

Native American

Institution
Publication Year
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 34

Full-Text Articles in Arts and Humanities

“Native American Folk Song Suite”: A Study Of Traditional Native American Melodies, The Role Of Music In Native American Society, And Its Translation To The Modern Wind Ensemble, Preston Parker Aug 2019

“Native American Folk Song Suite”: A Study Of Traditional Native American Melodies, The Role Of Music In Native American Society, And Its Translation To The Modern Wind Ensemble, Preston Parker

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Music holds a sacred place for the many Native American tribes of the United States. Over the past 150 years, ethnomusicologists Dr. Theodore Baker (1851-1934), Dr. Frances Densmore (1867-1957), and John Donald Robb (1892-1989) have preserved these songs by sitting down with indigenous Native Americans and recording their music straight from the source. Through these recordings, these ethnomusicologists created a springboard for composers, including myself, to study the past and create new music that honors the traditions and culture of Native Americans. I have applied my new knowledge of these musical techniques and traditions to create a work for wind ...


Entwined Threads Of Red And Black: The Hidden History Of Indigenous Enslavement In Louisiana, 1699-1824, Leila K. Blackbird Dec 2018

Entwined Threads Of Red And Black: The Hidden History Of Indigenous Enslavement In Louisiana, 1699-1824, Leila K. Blackbird

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

Contrary to nationalist teleologies, the enslavement of Native Americans was not a small and isolated practice in the territories that now comprise the United States. This thesis is a case study of its history in Louisiana from European contact through the Early American Period, utilizing French Superior Council and Spanish judicial records, Louisiana Supreme Court case files, statistical analysis of slave records, and the synthesis and reinterpretation of existing scholarship. This paper primarily argues that it was through anti-Blackness and anti-Indigeneity and with the utilization of socially constructed racial designations that “Indianness” was controlled and exploited, and that Native Americans ...


The Toxicity Of Otherness, Justin Malone Dec 2018

The Toxicity Of Otherness, Justin Malone

English Department: Traveling American Modernism Posters (ENG 366, Fall 2018)

This poster is a brief overview of my research on the dangerous philosophical principle of Othering, wherein a group of people are ostracized for being different from the majority. While categorization of information is a fundamental aspect of how the brain works, the categorization of people homogenizes their complexities. In doing so, a group is seen as a single entity, rather than individuals, which strips them of their humanity. After a group has been Othered, society will inevitably invoke some method of forced displacement upon them. Additionally, the article this poster summarizes puts emphasis on the importance of affected individuals ...


Performing Authentic Savagery: National Myth-Making And Indigenous Survival At American World's Fairs, 1893-1904, Hannah Facknitz May 2018

Performing Authentic Savagery: National Myth-Making And Indigenous Survival At American World's Fairs, 1893-1904, Hannah Facknitz

Senior Honors Projects, 2010-current

The late nineteenth century in America was a period of intense change, where society took on the project of describing what exactly made America what it was. An important vehicle for this exploration of identity was the world’s fair. This paper analyzes the Chicago World Columbian Exposition of 1893, the Omaha Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition of 1898, and the St. Louis Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904 and their depictions of Indigenous North Americans which were closely tied up in the current project of national myth making. A three-way conflict emerges in this study between contemporary anthropologists, entertainment professionals, and ...


Goose Hollow Mar 2018

Goose Hollow

Tracy J. Prince

One of the oldest neighborhoods in Portland, Goose Hollow has a fascinating history of roving bands of geese, the Great Plank Road, the tannery that helped put Portland on the map, blue-collar immigrants in the hollow, rich merchants in the heights, Chinese-American vegetable gardeners, and Native American traders living near the Chinese gardeners. 

The name of Goose Hollow, one of the oldest neighborhoods in Portland, first referred to the area around a hollow carved out by Tanner Creek. Since the mid 1970s, however, when the neighborhood association was formed, the name has applied to the larger neighborhood of flats and ...


Red Pens, White Paper: Wider Implications Of Coulthard’S Call To Sovereignty, Brian Burkhart, David J. Carlson, Billy J. Stratton, Theodore C. Van Alst, Carol Edelman Warrior Dec 2017

Red Pens, White Paper: Wider Implications Of Coulthard’S Call To Sovereignty, Brian Burkhart, David J. Carlson, Billy J. Stratton, Theodore C. Van Alst, Carol Edelman Warrior

English and Literary Arts: Faculty Scholarship

Transcript of a roundtable conversation focused on Glen Coulthard's book Red Skins, White Masks.


The "Noble Savage" In American Music And Literature, 1790-1855, Jacob Mathew Somers Jan 2017

The "Noble Savage" In American Music And Literature, 1790-1855, Jacob Mathew Somers

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

In the aftermath of the War of 1812, America entered a period of unprecedented territorial expansion, economic growth, and political unity. During this time American intellectuals, writers, and musicians began to contemplate the possibility of a national high culture to match the country’s glorious social and political achievements. Newly founded periodicals urged American authors and artists to adopt national themes and materials to replace those imported from abroad, and for the first time Americans began producing their own literary, artistic, and musical works on a previously inconceivable scale. Though American writers and composers explored a wide range of “national ...


Northwest Coast Native American Art: The Relationship Between Museums, Native Americans And Artists, Karrie E. Myers Aug 2016

Northwest Coast Native American Art: The Relationship Between Museums, Native Americans And Artists, Karrie E. Myers

Museum Studies Theses

Museums today have many responsibilities, including protecting and understanding objects in their care. Many also have relationships with groups of people whose items or artworks are housed within their institutions. This paper explores the relationship between museums and Northwest Coast Native Americans and their artists. Participating museums include those in and out of the Northwest Coast region, such as the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, the Burke Museum, the Royal British Columbia Museum, the American Museum of Natural History and the Smithsonian Museum. Museum professionals who conducted research for some of these museums included Franz Boas ...


Book Review: Lenape Country: Delaware Valley Society Before William Penn, Erich M. Huhn Apr 2016

Book Review: Lenape Country: Delaware Valley Society Before William Penn, Erich M. Huhn

Madison Historical Review

No abstract provided.


Displaced Heroism In 18th And 19th Century American Literature, Imelda Corazon Wistey Jan 2016

Displaced Heroism In 18th And 19th Century American Literature, Imelda Corazon Wistey

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

In this study, I argue that heroism requires displacement. This notion of heroism applies to a majority of hero tales because this displacement happens physically, mentally, or even psychologically. To analyze the displaced hero, certain 18th and 19th century American texts encapsulate instances of displaced heroism: women’s Indian captivity narratives, Charles Brockden Brown’s Edgar Huntly, and Life of Black Hawk. Focusing on displaced heroism in these specific texts allows for further commentary on the discussion of Americanness and the issues America faced when encountering the Native Americans in what they perceived to be a wilderness. This study compares ...


A Christian Perspective Of An Ojibwe Sweat For Women, Carol Z.A. Mcginnis, Julie Ogemaanungokwe Smith Jan 2016

A Christian Perspective Of An Ojibwe Sweat For Women, Carol Z.A. Mcginnis, Julie Ogemaanungokwe Smith

Counseling Educator Scholarship

It is a rare privilege to be invited to participate in a Native American Ojibwe sweat and I was fortunate to experience this as an all-female event with other counselors from across the US. As a pastoral counselor who comes from a Methodist Christian worldview, I thought it may be helpful to share my perspective with other counselors who may work with Native American clients who engage in this type of religious experience. Oftentimes we have difficulty in finding “common ground” from which to connect with clients from different cultures, and this experience helped me to see how our shared ...


Appropriating Balance: Reversing The Imbalance For Indigenous Women Through Spirituality, Candra Krisch Dec 2015

Appropriating Balance: Reversing The Imbalance For Indigenous Women Through Spirituality, Candra Krisch

The Journal of Traditions & Beliefs

No abstract provided.


Claiming The Best Of Both Worlds: Mixed Heritage Children Of The Pacific Northwest Fur Trade And The Formation Of Identity, Alanna Cameron Beason May 2015

Claiming The Best Of Both Worlds: Mixed Heritage Children Of The Pacific Northwest Fur Trade And The Formation Of Identity, Alanna Cameron Beason

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Intimacy and family have been pillars of the North American fur trade since its conception. This is especially true for fur trading companies centered in Canada, specifically the Hudson’s Bay Company and the Northwest Company. Kinship ties formed through intimate relations between European fur traders and indigenous women allowed the fur trade to flourish and created an environment for stable, mixed heritage family units to emerge. As mixed heritage children grew into adulthood, they learned to identify with both sides of their parental cultures. However, the connections they formed with each other proved the most valuable and a separate ...


A Contested Future: Buffalo Bill's Wild West, Native American Performers, And The Military's Struggle For Control Over Indian Affairs 1868-1898, Alexander Erez Echelman Jan 2015

A Contested Future: Buffalo Bill's Wild West, Native American Performers, And The Military's Struggle For Control Over Indian Affairs 1868-1898, Alexander Erez Echelman

Senior Projects Spring 2015

My project explores how and why William F. "Buffalo Bill" Cody glorified the military's wars against Native Americans on the Great Plains through his career as a showman in the United States and in Europe. The military's and the Interior Department's competition for control over Indian Affairs allowed Buffalo Bill to support the army's image by adhering to popular white supremacist ideas in the nation. I look at how Buffalo Bill used his Native American performers to exemplify the military's peace keeping skills in the West while devaluing the Interior Department's authority in Indian ...


Product Of The Past: The Struggle Between The Lakota Sioux Nation And The United States Government, Brittany Lombardo Jul 2014

Product Of The Past: The Struggle Between The Lakota Sioux Nation And The United States Government, Brittany Lombardo

Pell Scholars and Senior Theses

Many may be familiar with the national landmark that is Mount Rushmore, located in South Dakota. The heroes represent the leaders of the United States, the founding fathers. However, it shadows a rich history that is what came before the United States' invasion. The Lakota Sioux roamed freely throughout the Midwest, that is until the the US began to expand westward. The rich history of the Lakota lingers throughout their lives today, but is suppressed under a thick lair of oppression and mistreatment by the United States Government.


Considering Native American Students In Rural School Consolidation, Andrea Miller Oct 2013

Considering Native American Students In Rural School Consolidation, Andrea Miller

Great Plains Research: A Journal of Natural and Social Sciences

When discussing school consolidation it is important to consider the educational effects on Native American students. Many Native American students live in homes of poverty, deal with difficult home lives, and struggle academically. While there are many areas of concern in discussing consolidation, loss of a low student-teacher ratio, loss of connection with the school community, and loss of autonomy or control of schools are of particular importance. Consolidation efforts may bring some positive education opportunity for Native students which may include offering a diversified and expanded curriculum, specialization for staffing, and specialized resources for students. Discussing the potential effects ...


Sexual Violence Against Women Of Color: Achieving Agency Through Community Voice, Purposeful Silence, And Responsible Literary Representations, Trisha A. Henderson Jan 2013

Sexual Violence Against Women Of Color: Achieving Agency Through Community Voice, Purposeful Silence, And Responsible Literary Representations, Trisha A. Henderson

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Overall, my goal in creating this project is to prompt awareness to the issue of sexual violence against women in general; however, I want to bring attention to assault in communities of color, in particular. Women of color are devalued, and sexual violence against multicultural women is often underreported and not taken seriously enough. This thesis consists of three chapters, each one centered on sexual violence against women of color in contemporary American fiction. In Chapter 1, I contrast the use of voice in Harriet Prescott Spofford's "Circumstance" (1860) and Toni Morrison's Beloved (1987), highlighting how women of ...


Native Newspapers: The Emergence Of The American Indian Press 1960-Present, Russell M. Page Jan 2013

Native Newspapers: The Emergence Of The American Indian Press 1960-Present, Russell M. Page

CMC Senior Theses

During the 1960s and 1970s, tribes across Indian Country struggled for tribal sovereignty against “termination” policies that aimed to disintegrate the federal government’s trust responsibilities and treaty obligations to tribes and assimilate all Indians into mainstream society. Individual tribes, pan-Indian organizations, and militant Red Power activists rose up in resistance to these policies and fought for self-determination: a preservation of Indian distinctiveness and social and political autonomy. This thesis examines a crucial, but often overlooked, element of the self-determination movement. Hundreds of tribal and national-scope activist newspapers emerged during this era and became the authentic voices of American Indians ...


Talking Back To History: Leanne Howe, Linda Hogan, And Louis Owens's Rewriting Of The Southeastern Native Past Through Fiction, Kimberlee Kaitlyn Hodges Jan 2013

Talking Back To History: Leanne Howe, Linda Hogan, And Louis Owens's Rewriting Of The Southeastern Native Past Through Fiction, Kimberlee Kaitlyn Hodges

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

For years, non-Native anthropologists and historians have endeavored to unravel the inner-workings of Native American culture through close examinations of archeological evidence, Euro-American historical record, and oral histories. Consequently, in an attempt to reclaim and re-appropriate these pasts are the stories written by Native American authors and novelists such as LeAnne Howe (Choctaw), Louis Owens (Choctaw), and Linda Hogan (Chickasaw). Through their writings, one is able to more fully understand the history of Southeastern Native American tribes as they are given insight into what was and is most valued by Native American people to this day such as kinship, spirituality ...


Renegotiating Identities, Cultures And Histories: Oppositional Looking In Shelley Niro's "This Land Is Mime Land", Jennifer Danielle Mccall Jan 2012

Renegotiating Identities, Cultures And Histories: Oppositional Looking In Shelley Niro's "This Land Is Mime Land", Jennifer Danielle Mccall

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

My master's thesis explores the photographic series "This Land is Mime Land," which Shelley Niro made in 1992. Despite this work's complex form and structure, there are currently no sustained studies of this series alone, or books solely dedicated to Niro's art. Instead, "Mime Land" is often discussed in compilations that address a number of Native artists, Western feminist practices, or multiple works in Niro's oeuvre. My thesis fills this gap, as I closely investigate how "Mime Land" asks the viewer to look at visual culture, histories and Niro herself. Bell hooks's definition of the ...


Stereotypes Of Contemporary Native American Indian Characters In Recent Popular Media, Virginia A. Mclaurin Jan 2012

Stereotypes Of Contemporary Native American Indian Characters In Recent Popular Media, Virginia A. Mclaurin

Masters Theses 1911 - February 2014

This thesis examines the ongoing trends in depictions of Native American Indians in popular mainstream media from the last two decades. Stereotypes in general and in relation to Native American Indians are discussed, and a pattern of stereotype reactions to colonists’ perceived strains is identified. An analysis of popular television shows, movies, and books with contemporary Native characters will demonstrate new trends which we might consider transformed or emerging stereotypes of Native people in non-Native media. These trends will not only be shown to have emerged from more general national and regional stereotypes of Native identity, but will also demonstrate ...


"For The Purposes Of Example And Justice": Native American Incarceration In The Upper Mississippi Valley, 1803-1849, Mark Arvid Warburton May 2011

"For The Purposes Of Example And Justice": Native American Incarceration In The Upper Mississippi Valley, 1803-1849, Mark Arvid Warburton

Theses and Dissertations

This dissertation examines early-nineteenth-century Native American incarceration in the upper Mississippi Valley between 1803 and 1849. Drawing upon military and government documents, court records, treaties, and legal questions under the Trade and intercourse Acts--as well as upon memoirs, travel narratives and newspaper articles--it explores how and why United States officials routinely incarcerated Native American men living on those lands which now comprise the states of Missouri, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota. It details the experiences of Indian prisoners held in military fort guardhouses and small town jails as they endured and negotiated the terms of their incarcerations, with the assistance ...


Imperial Domesticity: Native American Gender Ideology And Conformity In The Late Nineteenth And Early Twentieth Centuries, Christina Moehrle Jan 2011

Imperial Domesticity: Native American Gender Ideology And Conformity In The Late Nineteenth And Early Twentieth Centuries, Christina Moehrle

American Studies Senior Theses

This project is informed by the history of Native American removal across Western lands, and the sociological and economic strategies that forced the assimilation of distinct native tribes into a mass, dominant white culture. Considering this assimilation through the imposition of domesticity and European gender ideology, this project aims to explore the political over and undertones of the cult of domesticity, and to analyze how domesticity and domestication were used to construct gender, social, and economic conformity. Post-bellum American politics regarded the women’s experience and domestic ideals as prototypes for national values. The importance of home production for the ...


Moneneheo And Naheverien Cheyenne And Mennonite Sewing Circles, Convergences And Conflicts, 1890-1970, Kimberly D. Schmidt Jan 2011

Moneneheo And Naheverien Cheyenne And Mennonite Sewing Circles, Convergences And Conflicts, 1890-1970, Kimberly D. Schmidt

Great Plains Quarterly

Marie Gerber Petter was skeptical. Born in the Swiss Jura Mountains, she knew that one does not find water in high places. It was 1893 when Marie and her husband, Rodolphe Petter, came to North America for the express purpose of bringing Christianity to Native Americans. After studying English and visiting Mennonite churches in Indiana, Ohio, and Kansas to garner monetary support for their work among the Southern Cheyenne, they made the forty-mile journey from Darlington, Oklahoma Territory, to an area near present-day Hammon by covered wagon. She was in need of water. When she asked, the local Cheyenne chief ...


The Dualities Of Endurance: A Collaborative Historical Archaeology Of Ethnogenesis At Brothertown, 1780-1910, Craig N. Cipolla May 2010

The Dualities Of Endurance: A Collaborative Historical Archaeology Of Ethnogenesis At Brothertown, 1780-1910, Craig N. Cipolla

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

The Brothertown Indian community formed in the late 18th century when segments of several tribal groups from coastal northeastern North America broke away from their home settlements to move west together. What united the community was a shared belief in Christianity, a dedication to practices of agriculture, and hopes of escaping the land politics and corrupting influences of colonial culture on the East Coast. This dissertation investigates the ethnogenesis, evolution, and endurance of the Brothertown Indian community from the perspective of collaborative historical archaeology. In doing so, it aims to reassess theories of culture, identity, and discourse in the modern ...


Designing, Producing And Enacting Nationalisms: Contemporary Amerindian Fashion In Canada, Cory Willmott Jan 2010

Designing, Producing And Enacting Nationalisms: Contemporary Amerindian Fashion In Canada, Cory Willmott

Cory A. Willmott

Today, generations after the adoption of European styles, Amerindian peoples’ everyday clothing is almost indistinguishable from that of other residents of North America. Until recently their culturally distinct clothing has been mainly reserved for ceremonial occasions such as powwows and religious rituals. This bifurcation of clothing styles and contexts parallels the dichotomy between ‘traditional’ and ‘assimilated’ Native identity that has been imposed by the dominant society. The dichotomy is a double bind: adopting ‘traditional’ identities, Native peoples are cast into a static ahistorical frame, while appearing ‘assimilated’ erases cultural distinctiveness. In both cases, Native peoples cannot effectively stake claims to ...


Transcultural Transformation: African American And Native American Relations, Barbara S. Tracy Jan 2009

Transcultural Transformation: African American And Native American Relations, Barbara S. Tracy

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research: Department of English

The intersected lives of African Americans and Native Americans result not only in Black Indians, but also in a shared culture that is evidenced by music, call and response, and story. These intersected lives create a dynamic of shared and diverging pathways that speak to each other. It is a crossroads of both anguish and joy that comes together and apart again like the tradition of call and response. There is a syncopation of two cultures becoming greater than their parts, a representation of losses that are reclaimed by a greater degree. In the tradition of call and response, by ...


The Getting Ready To Learn Program: An Impact Report, Rosa M. Avila Mar 2008

The Getting Ready To Learn Program: An Impact Report, Rosa M. Avila

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The Getting Ready to Learn (GRTL) program is an early intervention program designed to improve the developmental skills and learning capacity of Native American children in the Northwest Arctic region of Alaska. Early intervention programs have been found to decrease high school dropout rates and increase employment rates, which contribute to better health outcomes in young adulthood. The Northwest Arctic is a remote area that lacks many resources. As such, the people of this region experience various health disparities. The GRTL program was implemented in 7 of the 11 villages in the Northwest Arctic Borough of Alaska (NWABA). The purpose ...


Corral Family: Robert Corral Iii (Youth), Tara Runnels Jan 2005

Corral Family: Robert Corral Iii (Youth), Tara Runnels

Native American Stories

Robert Corral began his life in French Camp in 1979. He is of mixed ancestry—Caucasian, Mexican and Native American, but feels he identifies most with his Native American heritage. Robert feels his interests, beliefs and personality are similar to those of other Native Americans. He is very proud to consider himself a part of the Northern Valley Yokut/Ohlone/Me-Wok tribe and the California Indian culture.


Corral Family: Margaret Sanchez Corral (Middle), Lindsey Gaines Jan 2005

Corral Family: Margaret Sanchez Corral (Middle), Lindsey Gaines

Native American Stories

Margaret Sanchez has spoken two languages for as long as she can remember, Spanish and English. This allowed her to appreciate her dual cultural heritage from a young age. She was born in French Camp in 1952 and raised in Stockton. She was the third oldest of eight children. Her father, a mechanic, had Northern Valley Yokut, Ohlone, and Miwak ancestors while her mother was of Mexican decent. Her grandparents on both sides of the family, were strong influences on her childhood; the family spoke both English and Spanish at home and served cuisine from both cultures...