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Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project At Dickey, Maine : Final Environmental Impact Statement, New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division Jan 1981

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project At Dickey, Maine : Final Environmental Impact Statement, New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

The Final Impact Statement is supported by all appendices from all drafts as well as supplementary information provided in Supplements to those Appendices. It comprises three volumes. Volume I is the statement volume. Volume II consists of two parts. Part I contains the comment and response portion of Section 9 for the 1977 Draft EIS. Part II contains comments and responses on the 1978 Revised Draft EIS, in addition to reproductions of the original comment letters received on the Draft Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Report and responses to these comments. Volume III, Part I contains reproductions of the original comment ...


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes, Maine, Hydro-Power Decision, October 27, 1978, James B. Longley Jan 1978

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes, Maine, Hydro-Power Decision, October 27, 1978, James B. Longley

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

The Dickey-Lincoln School Project would consist of two earthfill structures designed to produce peaking and modest intermediate load power from the St. John River The larger of the two dams, the Dickey Dam, would be located immediately above the confluence of the Allagash and St. John Rivers. The Lincoln School Dam would also be located on the Upper St. John River, eleven miles downstream from the Dickey Dam. The Dickey Dam would have a total length of 10,600 feet and a maximum height of 335 feet. The Lincoln School Dam is considerably smaller and would be 1,600 feet ...


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Transmission Studies Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix B: Alternative Power Transmission Corridors, United States Department Of Energy, United States Department Of The Interior Jan 1978

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project Transmission Studies Environmental Impact Statement: Appendix B: Alternative Power Transmission Corridors, United States Department Of Energy, United States Department Of The Interior

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

This report identifies alternative corridors of land within which transmission lines could be routed and details various impacts on the environment which would be associated with introduction of transmission facilities. Many alternative corridor locations were identified (see Figure 1-1). Identification of these alternative transmission corridors was a complex process, since the number of potential corridors capable of connecting the various substations was myriad; the 'least desirable' potential corridors, i.e., those where transmission facilities might have entailed severest impacts on the environment, had to be eliminated from consideration before alternative corridors could be delineated. Identified alternative corridor locations were subsequently ...


Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project At Dickey, Maine : Draft Environmental Impact Statement, New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division Jan 1977

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project At Dickey, Maine : Draft Environmental Impact Statement, New England Division, United States Army Engineer Division

Dickey-Lincoln School Lakes Project

This draft EIS address the impacts of the dams and appurtenant structures. The marketing and transmission of power from Federal projects are the statutory responsibility of the Department of the Interior. Accordingly, they are conducting transmission line studies in the preparation of a draft EIS. The draft EIS for transmission line and marketing is scheduled to be submitted to the Council on Environmental Quality in February 1978. Both drafts will be combined and submitted as a Final Environmental Impact Statement in August 1978.