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Improving The Web Mastering Curriculum For The Included Classroom, Charles Zascavage, Victoria Zascavage Ph.D. 2010 Xavier University, Cincinnati

Improving The Web Mastering Curriculum For The Included Classroom, Charles Zascavage, Victoria Zascavage Ph.D.

Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education

Following the mandates of the 2004 Individuals with Disabilities Deduction Improvement Act (IDIEA) and No Child Left Behind (2001) high schools have included students with cognitive disabilities into business classes. Although some teachers believe that the inclusion of mild to moderate intellectually disabled students into the general business education classroom may increases academic achievement for the special needs student; it continues to be widely debated as to whether it benefits the typical student or not. This study examined the issues of inclusion from the perception of a business faculty member, a special education district supervisor, a high school special education ...


Students With Learning Disabilities: The Application Of Goffman's Stigma In The Inclusive Classroom, Christina DeRoche 2010 McMaster University

Students With Learning Disabilities: The Application Of Goffman's Stigma In The Inclusive Classroom, Christina Deroche

Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education

This case study provides a qualitative glimpse into one inclusive classroom in Northern Ontario. It explores the nature of peer interactions of students with learning disabilities (LD) and uses Goffman's concept of stigma to analyze how students with LD react or act within the classroom. Twenty-five children were observed on a daily basis for seven weeks and participant observation was the primary method of data collection. Of these 25 children, 9 had a LD. This study found that sadness, aggression, and competence were recurring themes in student-peer interactions. This study reveals that the major themes presented reflect what studies ...


Welcome, Patricia R. Renick Ph.D. 2010 Wright State University - Main Campus

Welcome, Patricia R. Renick Ph.D.

Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education

Welcome to the Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education and Happy New year and Happy New Decade. Our journal continues the conversation concerning inclusive education with this new edition.

Ms. Elizabeth Collett and Dr. Mary Jane Harkens explore inclusive education from the perspective of pre-service teachers. Their opening paragraph has some very powerful statements.

Mr. Charles Zascavage and Dr. Victoria Zascavage provide a compelling look at adapting and redesigning a web-mastering course with increased achievement for both students with special needs and general education students. The perspective is from a business education teacher and supervisor.

Ms. Christina DeRoche provides a qualitative ...


Attitudes Of Mathematics Teachers Towards The Inclusion Of Students With Learning Disabilities And Special Needs In Mainstream Classrooms, Dorit Patkin Ph.D., Tsafi Timor Ph.D. 2010 Kibbutzim College of Education, Tel Aviv, Israel

Attitudes Of Mathematics Teachers Towards The Inclusion Of Students With Learning Disabilities And Special Needs In Mainstream Classrooms, Dorit Patkin Ph.D., Tsafi Timor Ph.D.

Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education

The aim of this study is to examine the attitudes of 36 elementary school teachers towards the inclusion of students with learning disabilities in Mathematics in mainstream classes. The research related to three aspects: teachers’ knowledge of learning disabilities, teachers’ perceptions of the physical inclusion of these students, teachers’ perceptions of their responsibility towards the curricular inclusion of students with learning disabilities and towards curricular adaptations. Findings indicate that teachers’ knowledge of the topic is partial, whereas teachers’ attitudes towards inclusion are positive with regard to the three aspects of the research. The study yielded a need to incorporate the ...


Response To Intervention: Right On Track, Charmion B. Rush, Nicole Dobbins Ph.D., Stephanie A. Kurtts Ph.D. 2010 UNCG

Response To Intervention: Right On Track, Charmion B. Rush, Nicole Dobbins Ph.D., Stephanie A. Kurtts Ph.D.

Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education

The purpose of response to intervention, or RTI, is founded on the premise that, with data-based decision making and evidence- based practices, children who otherwise may have been identified with a mild educational disability will receive early instructional intervention and thus have the opportunity to remain with their peers in general education settings. For RTI to be successful, educational professionals need to have the core building blocks for implementation. A comprehensive RTI plan integrates academic interventions with behavioral supports to catch struggling learners early. Identification models that include RTI may lead to better achievement and behavior outcomes for all students ...


Examining The Relationship Between Early College Credit And Higher Education Achievement Of First-Time Undergraduate Students In South Texas, Carl A. Saltarelli Ph.D. 2010 Wright State University

Examining The Relationship Between Early College Credit And Higher Education Achievement Of First-Time Undergraduate Students In South Texas, Carl A. Saltarelli Ph.D.

Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationship between early college credit and the success of first-time undergraduate students in South Texas. Many high school graduates are entering college with credits earned while they were enrolled in high school. Researchers have examined the value of early college credit in easing students’ transition from high school to college. Additionally, researchers have investigated the value of early college credit in enhancing students’ early college persistence rates. This researcher focused on the relationships between early college credit and college student achievement of first-time undergraduate students. In the study, student achievement was ...


The Evolution Of A New College Course In Behavior Management: A Case Study In Collaboration And Compromise, Richard L. Mehrenberg Ph.D. 2010 Millersville University

The Evolution Of A New College Course In Behavior Management: A Case Study In Collaboration And Compromise, Richard L. Mehrenberg Ph.D.

Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education

This article describes the development of a new behavior management course for both elementary and special education pre-service teachers at a Pennsylvania college. The evolution of the course is detailed through a four stage process:(a) identifying stakeholders, (b) defining priorities, (c) content collaboration, and (d) reaching a compromise. The study concludes with a discussion of what yet needs to be accomplished and strategies for implementation.


Exploring Inclusive Education From The Perspective Of Preservice Teachers, Elizabeth Collett, Mary Jane Harkins Ph.D. 2010 Mt St Vincent University

Exploring Inclusive Education From The Perspective Of Preservice Teachers, Elizabeth Collett, Mary Jane Harkins Ph.D.

Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education

This study investigates the nature of preservice secondary teachers’ perceptions of the Individual Program Plan (IPP) process enrolled in a two-year Bachelor of Education program in a university in Eastern Canada. Teachers’ perceptions have been a vital feature in the successful implementation of the IPP process, and inclusion in general. Therefore, it will be crucial for educational leaders and stakeholders to have a clear understanding of preservice teachers’ perceptions of the IPP process and the factors that affect those perceptions prior to entering the profession. Results suggested that secondary preservice teachers’ tended to hold generally positive perceptions of the IPP ...


Teacher And Students' Perceptions Of A Modified Inclusion Classroom Environment, Elizabeth Kirby Fullerton Ph.D., Caroline Guardino Ph.D. 2010 University of North Florida

Teacher And Students' Perceptions Of A Modified Inclusion Classroom Environment, Elizabeth Kirby Fullerton Ph.D., Caroline Guardino Ph.D.

Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education

The purpose of this study was to examine how modifying the inclusion classroom impacts teacher and students’ perceptions of their learning environment. Prior to intervention the teacher was interviewed providing information about her preferred modifications. Following the intervention the teacher completed a rating scale and a post interview. The students completed a classroom environment student survey (CESS), to assess their perceptions of the classroom before, during, and after modifications were made. Twenty fourth grade students, as well as their teacher participated in the study. Implications for practitioners and researchers are discussed.


Co-Teaching Beliefs To Support Inclusive Education: Survey Of Relationships Between General And Special Educators In Inclusive Classes, Ida Malian Ph.D., Erin McRae 2010 Arizona State University

Co-Teaching Beliefs To Support Inclusive Education: Survey Of Relationships Between General And Special Educators In Inclusive Classes, Ida Malian Ph.D., Erin Mcrae

Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education

Co-teaching is a prevalent approach to providing effective instruction in inclusive classes. The purpose of this study was to determine teachers’ perceptions of compatibility and discrepancy between their approaches to teaching, personal characteristics and efficacy of co-teaching. Noonan’s Co-teacher Relationship Scale was adapted to survey the co-teachers statewide. Results of the statewide survey of Arizona general and special educators teaching in inclusive classes are presented as they relate to their responses. Various aspects of co-teaching relationships and teacher implementation of co-teaching models are discussed. The authors derive attributes of co-teachers in Arizona that indicate compatibility and sustainability of co-teaching ...


Inclusive Practices In Tennessee: An Investigation Of Co-Teaching In Middle Tennessee Schools, Vance L. Austin Ph.D. 2010 Wright State University

Inclusive Practices In Tennessee: An Investigation Of Co-Teaching In Middle Tennessee Schools, Vance L. Austin Ph.D.

Electronic Journal for Inclusive Education

With the advent of Inclusion (circa 1992) predicated on the principle of the “Least Restricted Environment” (USDOE, 2003) and the recent “No Child Left Behind” legislation, schools and school districts around the country began educating students with disabilities in general education classrooms. Arguments for and against the efficacy of this practice flourished among teachers and researchers alike. Nevertheless, state education and local education agencies (SEAs and LEAs) adopted the recommended initiative and began to institute inclusive practices within most of their schools. This service delivery change created a dilemma for the general education teachers who considered themselves unprepared for the ...


Kinematics Of Disease Progression In Bulbar Als, Yana Yunusova, Jordan R. Green, Mary J. Lindstrom, Laura J. Ball, Gary L. Pattee, Lorne Zinman 2010 University of Toronto, Faculty of Law

Kinematics Of Disease Progression In Bulbar Als, Yana Yunusova, Jordan R. Green, Mary J. Lindstrom, Laura J. Ball, Gary L. Pattee, Lorne Zinman

Special Education and Communication Disorders Faculty Publications

The goal of this study was to investigate the deterioration of lip and jaw movements during speech longitudinally in three individuals diagnosed with bulbar amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The study was motivated by the need to understand the relationship between physiologic changes in speech movements and clinical measures of speech performance such as speaking rate and speech intelligibility. Movements of the lip and jaw were quantified with respect to their size speed, and duration. The data revealed several changes in lip and jaw movement that coincided with ALS progression. In two out of three speakers, the changes in measures of ...


Laryngeal Somatosensory Deficits In Parkinson’S Disease: Implications For Speech Respiratory And Phonatory Control, Michael J. Hammer, Steven M. Barlow 2010 University of Wisconsin

Laryngeal Somatosensory Deficits In Parkinson’S Disease: Implications For Speech Respiratory And Phonatory Control, Michael J. Hammer, Steven M. Barlow

Special Education and Communication Disorders Faculty Publications

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is often associated with substantial impairment of speech respiratory and phonatory control. However, the degree to which these impairments are related to abnormal laryngeal sensory function is unknown. This study examined whether individuals with PD exhibited abnormal and more asymmetric laryngeal somatosensory function compared with healthy controls, and whether these deficits were associated with disease and voice severity. Nineteen PD participants were tested and compared with 18 healthy controls. Testing included endoscopic assessment of laryngeal somatosensory function, with aerodynamic and acoustic assessment of respiratory and phonatory control, and clinical ratings of voice and disease severity. PD ...


Orostiff: Face-Referenced Measurement Of Perioral Stiffness In Health And Disease, Shin-Ying Chu, Steven M. Barlow, Douglas Kieweg, Jaehoon Lee 2010 University of Kansas

Orostiff: Face-Referenced Measurement Of Perioral Stiffness In Health And Disease, Shin-Ying Chu, Steven M. Barlow, Douglas Kieweg, Jaehoon Lee

Special Education and Communication Disorders Faculty Publications

A new device and automated measurement technology known as OroSTIFF is described to characterize non-participatory perioral stiffness in healthy adults for eventual application to patients with orofacial movement disorders associated with neuromotor disease, traumatic injury, or congenital clefts of the upper lip. Previous studies of perioral biomechanics required head stabilization for extended periods of time during measurement which precluded sampling patients with involuntary body/head movements (dyskinesias), or pediatric subjects. The OroSTIFF device is face-referenced and avoids the complications associated with head-restraint. Supporting data of non-participatory perioral tissue stiffness using OroSTIFF are included from 10 male and 10 female healthy ...


Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Changes Speech Respiratory And Laryngeal Control In Parkinson's Disease, Michael J. Hammer, Steven M. Barlow, Kelly E. Lyons, Rajesh Pahwa 2010 University of Wisconsin

Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation Changes Speech Respiratory And Laryngeal Control In Parkinson's Disease, Michael J. Hammer, Steven M. Barlow, Kelly E. Lyons, Rajesh Pahwa

Special Education and Communication Disorders Faculty Publications

Adequate respiratory and laryngeal motor control are essential for speech, but may be impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD). Bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) improves limb function in PD, but the effects on respiratory and laryngeal control remain unknown. We tested whether STN DBS would change aerodynamic measures of respiratory and laryngeal control, and whether these changes were correlated with limb function and stimulation parameters. Eighteen PD participants with bilateral STN DBS were tested within a morning session after a minimum of 12 h since their most recent dose of anti-PD medication. Testing occurred when DBS was ...


A Cross-Sectional Comparison Of The Effects Of Phonotactic Probability And Neighborhood Density On Word Learning By Preschool Children, Jill R. Hoover, Holly L. Storkel, Tiffany Hogan 2010 Indiana University

A Cross-Sectional Comparison Of The Effects Of Phonotactic Probability And Neighborhood Density On Word Learning By Preschool Children, Jill R. Hoover, Holly L. Storkel, Tiffany Hogan

Special Education and Communication Disorders Faculty Publications

Two experiments examined the effects of phonotactic probability and neighborhood density on word learning by 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children. Nonwords orthogonally varying in probability and density were taught with learning and retention measured via picture naming. Experiment 1 used a within-story probability/across-story density exposure context. Experiment 2 used an across-story probability/within-story density exposure context. Results showed that probability and density interacted to create optimal learning conditions. Specifically, rare/sparse sound sequences appeared to facilitate triggering of word learning. In contrast, the optimal convergence for lexical configuration and engagement was dependent on exposure context. In particular, common sound ...


Vowel Recognition From Continuous Articulatory Movements For Speaker-Dependent Applications, Jun Wang, Jordan R. Green, Ashok Samal, Tom D. Carrell 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Vowel Recognition From Continuous Articulatory Movements For Speaker-Dependent Applications, Jun Wang, Jordan R. Green, Ashok Samal, Tom D. Carrell

Special Education and Communication Disorders Faculty Publications

A novel approach was developed to recognize vowels from continuous tongue and lip movements. Vowels were classified based on movement patterns (rather than on derived articulatory features, e.g., lip opening) using a machine learning approach. Recognition accuracy on a single-speaker dataset was 94.02% with a very short latency. Recognition accuracy was better for high vowels than for low vowels. This finding parallels previous empirical findings on tongue movements during vowels. The recognition algorithm was then used to drive an articulation-to-acoustics synthesizer. The synthesizer recognizes vowels from continuous input stream of tongue and lip movements and plays the corresponding ...


Tac-Cell Inputs To Human Hand And Lip Induces Shortterm Adaptation Of The Primary Somatosensory Cortex, Lalit Venkatesan, Steven M. Barlow, Mihai Popescu, Anda Popescu, Edward T. Auer 2010 University of Kansas

Tac-Cell Inputs To Human Hand And Lip Induces Shortterm Adaptation Of The Primary Somatosensory Cortex, Lalit Venkatesan, Steven M. Barlow, Mihai Popescu, Anda Popescu, Edward T. Auer

Special Education and Communication Disorders Faculty Publications

A new pneumatic tactile stimulator, called the TAC-Cell, was developed in our laboratory to noninvasively deliver patterned cutaneous stimulation to the face and hand in order to study the neuromagnetic response adaptation patterns within the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in young adult humans. Individual TAC-Cells were positioned on the glabrous surface of the right hand, and midline of the upper and lower lip vermilion. A 151-channel magnetoencephalography (MEG) scanner was used to record the cortical response to a novel tactile stimulus which consisted of a repeating 6-pulse train delivered at three different frequencies through the active membrane surface of the ...


Lip Movement Exaggerations During Infant Directed Speech, Jordan R. Green, Ignatius S. B. Nip, Erin M. Wilson, Antje Mefferd, Yana Yunusova 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Lip Movement Exaggerations During Infant Directed Speech, Jordan R. Green, Ignatius S. B. Nip, Erin M. Wilson, Antje Mefferd, Yana Yunusova

Special Education and Communication Disorders Faculty Publications

Purpose: Although a growing body of literature has indentified the positive effects of visual speech on speech and language learning, oral movements of infant directed speech have rarely been studied. This investigation used 3-dimensional motion capture technology to describe how mothers modify their lip movements when talking to their infants.
Method: Lip movements were recorded from twenty-five mothers as they spoke to their infants and other adults. Lip shapes were analyzed for differences across speaking conditions. The maximum fundamental frequency, duration, acoustic intensity, and first and second formant frequency of each vowel were also measured.
Results: Lip movements were significantly ...


Age Effect On The Gaze Stabilization Test, Julie A. Honaker 2010 University of Nebraska at Lincoln

Age Effect On The Gaze Stabilization Test, Julie A. Honaker

Special Education and Communication Disorders Faculty Publications

Impairments of the vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR) lead to a decline in visual acuity during head movements. Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) testing is a sensitive assessment tool for detecting VOR impairments. DVA evaluates accuracy of visual acuity during fixed velocity head movements. In contrast, the Gaze Stabilization test (GST) is a new functional evaluation of the VOR that identifies a person’s maximum head velocity (in degrees per second) a person can maintain with stable vision of a target (i.e. optotype). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of age on the GST in participants without vestibular ...


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