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New Governance In The Teeth Of Human Frailty: Lessons From Financial Regulation, Cristie L. Ford 2010 Columbia Law School / University of British Columbia Faculty of Law

New Governance In The Teeth Of Human Frailty: Lessons From Financial Regulation, Cristie L. Ford

Cristie L. Ford

New Governance scholarship has made important theoretical and practical contributions to a broad range of regulatory arenas, including securities and financial markets regulation. In the wake of the global financial crisis, question about the scope of possibilities for this scholarship are more pressing than ever. Is new governance a full-blown alternative to existing legal structures, or is it a useful complement? Are there essential preconditions to making it work, or can a new governance strategy improve any decision making structure? If there are essential preconditions, what are they? Is new governance “modular” – that is, does it still confer benefits when ...


Principles-Based Securities Regulation In The Wake Of The Global Financial Crisis, Cristie L. Ford 2010 Columbia Law School / University of British Columbia Faculty of Law

Principles-Based Securities Regulation In The Wake Of The Global Financial Crisis, Cristie L. Ford

Cristie L. Ford

This paper seeks to re-examine, and ultimately to restate the case for, principles-based securities regulation in light of the global financial crisis and related developments. Prior to the onset of the crisis, the concept of more principles-based financial regulation was gaining traction in regulatory practice and policy circles, particularly in the United Kingdom and Canada. The crisis of course cast financial regulatory systems internationally, including more principles-based approaches, into severe doubt. This paper argues that principles-based securities regulation as properly understood remains a viable and even necessary policy option, which offers solutions to the real-life and theoretical challenge that the ...


Affinity And Affiliation: The Dual-Carriage Way To Team Identification, Mark P. Pritchard, Jeffrey L. Stinson, Elizabeth Patton 2010 Central Washington University

Affinity And Affiliation: The Dual-Carriage Way To Team Identification, Mark P. Pritchard, Jeffrey L. Stinson, Elizabeth Patton

All Faculty Scholarship for the College of Business

The article investigates the significance of affinity and affiliation in fan determination with a sports team. The study examines the association of team affinity and organizational affiliation in the establishment of student identification with an intercollegiate football team. It shows the stronger role of affiliation in college sports. It notes that fan intentions to attend games is attributed to team determination. It suggests that there are some common processes at work and that developed attachment may not be wise. The effects for practice and future research are also discussed.


Relational Cohesion Theory, Edward J. Lawler 2010 Cornell University

Relational Cohesion Theory, Edward J. Lawler

Articles and Chapters

[Excerpt] Relational cohesion theory explains how and when people who are exchanging things of value develop stable, cohesive relations. It starts from the idea that people tend to interact or do things with others because they get something they value or want from those others. They give something to the other and receive something in return. This is termed a social exchange. The valued "goods” that are exchanged may be tangible or intangible. Employees exchange their labor for pay, clients exchange money for services, neighbors exchange assistance with each other's yards, coworkers exchange advice and information, roommates exchange respect ...


Corruption As Social Exchange, Edward J. Lawler, Lena Hipp 2010 Cornell University

Corruption As Social Exchange, Edward J. Lawler, Lena Hipp

Articles and Chapters

This chapter applies social exchange theory to corruption. If two parties exhibit corrupt behaviors, secrecy becomes a new joint good, making the two parties more dependent on each other (an increase in total power). Since no external enforcement mechanisms are available in illicit exchanges, the initial reciprocal exchange pattern shifts toward negotiated or productive forms of exchange. Such forms of exchange, however, tend to leave traces, either because the amount of traded resources increases or the contingencies between the behaviors become more visible to the outside. Using the larger network structure, in which corrupt exchanges are embedded, to deal with ...


Organizational Justice: Perceptions Of Being Fairly Treated, David R. Dunaetz 2010 Southeastern University - Lakeland

Organizational Justice: Perceptions Of Being Fairly Treated, David R. Dunaetz

Selected Faculty Publications

When members of mission organizations perceive injustice within their organization, they work less effectively and attrition is more likely. This paper examines various types of organizational justice (distributive, procedural, interpersonal, and informational) which need to be monitored and maximized to help mission organizations accomplish their goals.


Good Lamps Are The Best Police: Darkness Increases Dishonesty And Self-Interested Behavior, Chen Bo-Zhong, Vanessa K. Bohns, Francesca Gino 2010 University of Toronto

Good Lamps Are The Best Police: Darkness Increases Dishonesty And Self-Interested Behavior, Chen Bo-Zhong, Vanessa K. Bohns, Francesca Gino

Articles and Chapters

Darkness can conceal identity and encourage moral transgressions; it may also induce a psychological feeling of illusory anonymity that disinhibits dishonest and self-interested behavior regardless of actual anonymity. Three experiments provided empirical evidence supporting this prediction. In Experiment 1, participants in a room with slightly dimmed lighting cheated more and thus earned more undeserved money than those in a well-lit room. In Experiment 2, participants wearing sunglasses behaved more selfishly than those wearing clear glasses. Finally, in Experiment 3, an illusory sense of anonymity mediated the relationship between darkness and self-interested behaviors. Across all three experiments, darkness had no bearing ...


The Global Crisis Of 2007–2009: Markets, Politics, And Organizations, Mauro F. Guillén, Sandra L. Suárez 2010 University of Pennsylvania

The Global Crisis Of 2007–2009: Markets, Politics, And Organizations, Mauro F. Guillén, Sandra L. Suárez

Management Papers

In this article, we examine the different causal chains leading to the crisis in the United States and around the world, emphasizing the market developments, political decisions, and organizational factors that led to the financial and economic meltdown. We argue that a series of political, regulatory, and organizational decisions and events prepared the ground for a major breakdown of financial and economic institutions, a “normal accident” that produced systemic reverberations across markets around the world. In the United States, political, regulatory, and organizational decisions made during the 1990s led to a situation of simultaneously high complexity and tight coupling in ...


Corporations And Economic Inequality Around The World: The Paradox Of Hierarchy, Gerald F. Davis, J. Adam Cobb 2010 University of Pennsylvania

Corporations And Economic Inequality Around The World: The Paradox Of Hierarchy, Gerald F. Davis, J. Adam Cobb

Management Papers

Using time-series data from the US since 1950 and from 53 countries around the world in 2006, this chapter documents a strong negative relation between an economy’s employment concentration (that is, the proportion of the labor force employed by the largest 10, 25, or 50 firms) and its level of income inequality. Within the US, we find that trends in the relative size of the largest employers (up in the 1960s and 1970s, down in the 1980s and 1990s, up in the 2000s) are directly linked to changes in inequality, and that corporate size is a proximal cause of ...


Trusts Versus Corporations: An Empirical Analysis Of Competing Organizational Forms, A. Joseph Warburton 2010 Syracuse University

Trusts Versus Corporations: An Empirical Analysis Of Competing Organizational Forms, A. Joseph Warburton

College of Law Faculty - Scholarship

This paper studies the effects of organizational form on managerial behavior and firm performance, from an empirical perspective. Managers of trusts are subject to stricter fiduciary responsibilities than managers of corporations. This paper examines the ramifications empirically, by exploiting data generated by a change in British regulations in the 1990s that allowed mutual funds to organize as either a trust or a corporation. I find evidence that trust law is effective in curtailing opportunistic behavior, as trust managers charge significantly lower fees than their observationally equivalent corporate counterparts. Trust managers also incur lower risk. However, evidence suggests that trust managers ...


Reasons We Don't Need A Formal Recognition System For Student Affairs Graduate Preparation Programs That Demonstrate Compliance With The Cas Standards: 12 Myths, Aaron W. Hughey 2010 Western Kentucky University

Reasons We Don't Need A Formal Recognition System For Student Affairs Graduate Preparation Programs That Demonstrate Compliance With The Cas Standards: 12 Myths, Aaron W. Hughey

Counseling & Student Affairs Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Distributive Justice Beliefs And Group Idea Generation: Does A Belief In Equity Facilitate Productivity?, Jack A. Goncalo, Sharon H. Kim 2010 Cornell University

Distributive Justice Beliefs And Group Idea Generation: Does A Belief In Equity Facilitate Productivity?, Jack A. Goncalo, Sharon H. Kim

Articles and Chapters

The equity rule is favored by groups that emphasize productivity, but there is limited support for the notion that equity actually facilitates productivity in groups (Deutsch, 1985). We propose that the relationship between equity and productivity may depend on whether individual group members have an independent or interdependent self-construal. This prediction was tested in an experiment in which groups endorsed either an equity rule or an equality rule for distributing resources and then generated ideas as a group. The results showed that equity facilitated productivity (e.g., the number of ideas generated) but only in groups whose members had been ...


An Entrepreneurial Approach To Career Development, Connie I. Reimers-Hild 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

An Entrepreneurial Approach To Career Development, Connie I. Reimers-Hild

Kimmel Education and Research Center - Presentations and White Papers

This article explains how people can use an entrepreneurial approach to career development in and effort to advance their careers and employment opportunities.


Sustainability Through Profitability: The Triple Bottom Line, Connie I. Reimers-Hild 2010 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Sustainability Through Profitability: The Triple Bottom Line, Connie I. Reimers-Hild

Kimmel Education and Research Center - Presentations and White Papers

Today’s highly competitive, globalized world requires organizations and businesses to think differently about how they are going to stay in business. Businesses can no longer afford to focus on profits as their sole purpose for existence. Organizations must instead think about the “Triple Bottom Line” and its implications for their ability to grow their brand, customer loyalty and profits.


Guest Editorial: The Magic Pill To Success, Illene Roggensack 2010 Third Sector Innovations

Guest Editorial: The Magic Pill To Success, Illene Roggensack

Collaborative Librarianship

No abstract provided.


Reflecting On Experience For Leadership Development, Adrian Chan 2010 University of Nebraska at Lincoln

Reflecting On Experience For Leadership Development, Adrian Chan

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research from the College of Business

This study proposes that being reflective or ruminative about one's leadership experience can have differential effects on one's leadership efficacy, implicit leadership theories and psychological capital. Specifically, through the aid of an event history calendar, conscript military trainees of high and low military experience from a SE Asian military organization were randomly assigned to recall and reflect or ruminate on his past leadership experience. Results show that type of reflection interacts with level of military leadership experience to differentially affect one's leadership efficacy, implicit leadership theories and leadership self-awareness. Reflection triggers produced significantly higher levels of implicit ...


An Experimental Study Of The Impact Of Psychological Capital On Performance, Engagement, And The Contagion Effect, Timothy Daniel Hodges 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

An Experimental Study Of The Impact Of Psychological Capital On Performance, Engagement, And The Contagion Effect, Timothy Daniel Hodges

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research from the College of Business

Psychological Capital, or PsyCap, is a core construct consisting of the positive psychological resources of efficacy, hope, optimism, and resilience. Previous research has consistently linked PsyCap to workplace outcomes including employee attitudes, behaviors, and performance. Further research has explored the ways in which PsyCap can be developed through relatively brief workplace interventions. The present study focuses on PsyCap development and the relationship to employee engagement and performance. In an experimental design with random assignment of subjects to control group (n = 52 managers and 152 associates) and treatment group (n = 58 managers and 239 employees), a field sample of managers in ...


“Why Didn’T You Just Ask?” Underestimating The Discomfort Of Help-Seeking, Vanessa K. Bohns, Francis J. Flynn 2010 Cornell University

“Why Didn’T You Just Ask?” Underestimating The Discomfort Of Help-Seeking, Vanessa K. Bohns, Francis J. Flynn

Articles and Chapters

Across four studies we demonstrate that people in a position to provide help tend to underestimate the role that embarrassment plays in decisions about whether or not to ask for help. As a result, potential helpers may overestimate the likelihood that people will ask for help (Studies 1 and 2). Further, helpers may be less inclined to allocate resources to underutilized support programs than help-seekers because they are less likely to attribute low levels of use to help-seekers’ concerns with embarrassment (Study 3). Finally, helpers may misjudge the most effective means of encouraging help-seeking behavior - emphasizing the practical benefits of ...


Competitive Priorities And Strategic Consensus In Emerging Economies: Evidence From India, Ravi Kathuria, Stephen J. Porth, N. N. Kathuria, T. K. Kohli 2010 Chapman University

Competitive Priorities And Strategic Consensus In Emerging Economies: Evidence From India, Ravi Kathuria, Stephen J. Porth, N. N. Kathuria, T. K. Kohli

Business Faculty Articles and Research

Purpose

– The purpose of this paper is to understand the competitive priorities of manufacturers in India, and examine the level of agreement or strategic consensus between senior executives and manufacturing managers on manufacturing competitive priorities in light of the prevalent culture.

Design/methodology/approach

– Survey data collected from 156 respondents from 78 manufacturing units based on a national sample in India are used to test the hypotheses using the paired samples t‐tests and multivariate analysis of variance.

Findings

– A relatively high emphasis by both levels of managers on quality, compared to the other three competitive priorities, is noteworthy and ...


Thomas Kuhn And Corporate Governance Research, William Q. Judge 2010 Old Dominion University

Thomas Kuhn And Corporate Governance Research, William Q. Judge

Management Faculty Publications

Back in the dark ages (i.e., 1980s) when I was pursuing my doctoral degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, I read Thomas Kuhn’s (1962) book on how science evolves over time. That book had a big influence on my thinking then, and it continues to influence me. Indeed, that book seems especially pertinent to this particular issue for reasons which I will explain later on in this essay.


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