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The Curation Of Worldviews, Jason Toney 2016 Bard College

The Curation Of Worldviews, Jason Toney

Senior Projects Fall 2016

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Social Studies of Bard College.


Thoughts On Poetry, Alexandra B. Gustafson 2016 The College of Wooster

Thoughts On Poetry, Alexandra B. Gustafson

Senior Independent Study Theses

The subject of this three-part project is poetry. More specifically, the project is a collection of thoughts about poetry, the language of poetry, and poetry-as-philosophy.

In its introductory section can be found a description of two competing accounts of language: referent theory, and meaning-is-use. While the latter seems a more complete picture on the whole, or so I assert, one must wonder: does it account for all the ways we use language? Specifically, can it account for the language of our main subject—poetry?

I assert not. In this vein, the second part of the project attempts to do what ...


On Language, Art, And Intuitions, Jack Hernandez 2016 University of Colorado, Boulder

On Language, Art, And Intuitions, Jack Hernandez

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper uses a neo-Wittgensteinian lens to explore the effect that language has on our conceptual intuitions, highlighting the fact that certain artworks, in so far as they are logically possible, provide special insight with regard to our conceptual concerns. Through an in-depth analysis of the comedic television series Rick and Morty, this paper will argue that our conceptual intuitions are often unable to be understood through the traditional analytic practice of explicating precise definitions in terms of necessary and sufficient conditions. Rather, to understand our concepts and the intuitions behind them we must expand our methods of analysis to ...


Cuasi Factivos, Axel Barcelo Aspeitia, Robert J. Stainton 2015 University of Western Ontario

Cuasi Factivos, Axel Barcelo Aspeitia, Robert J. Stainton

Robert J. Stainton

We introduce a construction which we label 'quasi-factive'. They are heard like factives, in that we immediately take the complement to be true. Yet they aren't really factive at all. Examples include: 'It's not widely known that Marta was born in Canada' (because she was born in Uruguay); 'Don't tell anyone that Carlos will run as a candidate' (because he won't); 'Did it bother Jane that Miguel came?' (no, because Miguel didn't come). We identify sub-categories of our quasi-factives, and then tentatively explore a pragmatic explanation of how they work their magic.


A Deranged Argument Against Public Languages, Robert J. Stainton 2015 University of Western Ontario

A Deranged Argument Against Public Languages, Robert J. Stainton

Robert J. Stainton

My focus is Q: Are there really such things as public languages? I address an argument for a negative answer, extracted from Davidson’s “A Derangement of Epitaphs”. The argument appeals to an empirically attested phenomena, namely novelty and speech errors in successful conversational interactions, to show that knowledge of public language is neither necessary nor sufficient. Thus public languages have no explanatory role. Continues the idea, one should substitute in place of the convention-centric public language picture an alternative, with Prior and Passing theories. My first rebuttal is that there are senses in which knowledge of public language is ...


Vol 7 No 1 Contents Page, 2015 San Jose State University

Vol 7 No 1 Contents Page

Comparative Philosophy

No abstract provided.


Vol 7 No 1 Information Page, 2015 San Jose State University

Vol 7 No 1 Information Page

Comparative Philosophy

No abstract provided.


Vol 7 No 1 Cover Page, 2015 San Jose State University

Vol 7 No 1 Cover Page

Comparative Philosophy

No abstract provided.


Articulating The World: Conceptual Understanding And The Scientific Image, Joseph Rouse 2015 Wesleyan University

Articulating The World: Conceptual Understanding And The Scientific Image, Joseph Rouse

Joseph Rouse

The most difficult challenge for naturalists in philosophy is accounting for scientific understanding of nature as itself a scientifically intelligible natural phenomenon. This book advances naturalism with a novel response to this challenge, drawing upon the philosophy of scientific practice and interdisciplinary science studies, philosophical work on the normativity of conceptual understanding, and new developments in evolutionary biology. The book’s two parts develop complementary, mutually supporting revisions to familiar accounts of conceptual understanding and of Sellars’s “scientific image” of ourselves-in-the-world. The first part shows how language and scientific practices exemplify the evolutionary process of niche construction. Conceptual capacities ...


Department Of Philosophy Colloquium Series, University of Maine Department of Philosophy 2015 The University of Maine

Department Of Philosophy Colloquium Series, University Of Maine Department Of Philosophy

Cultural Affairs Distinguished Lecture Series

The Department of Philosophy Colloquium Series exposes students and other attendees to discussions of different philosophical topics and viewpoints. Two of the speakers this year will address environmental themes.


Contesting Gender Concepts, Language And Norms: Three Critical Articles On Ethical And Political Aspects Of Gender Non-Conformity, Stephanie Julia Kapusta 2015 The University of Western Ontario

Contesting Gender Concepts, Language And Norms: Three Critical Articles On Ethical And Political Aspects Of Gender Non-Conformity, Stephanie Julia Kapusta

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

In chapter one I firstly critique some contemporary family-resemblance approaches to the category woman, and claim that they do not take sufficient account of dis-semblance, that is, resemblances that people have in common with members of the contrast category man. Second, I analyze how the concept of woman is semantically contestable: resemblance/dissemblance structures give rise to vagueness and to borderline cases. Borderline cases can either be included in the category or excluded from it. The factors which incline parties in a dispute about membership to include or exclude depend on metaphysical, ethical, or political background assumptions.

In chapter two ...


A Biopsychological Foundation For Linguistics, Jonathan J. Life 2015 The University of Western Ontario

A Biopsychological Foundation For Linguistics, Jonathan J. Life

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

In this dissertation, I defend the view that natural languages are concrete biopsychological phenomena to be studied empirically. In Section One, I begin with an historical explanation. Some analytic philosophers, I argue, misapply formal logic as an analysis of natural language, when it was in fact originally developed as an alternative to natural language, employed for scientific purposes. Abstract, quasi-mathematical philosophies of language, I argue, are partially a result of this misunderstanding. I respond to Jerrold Katz’ argument that a proper understanding of analytic truth requires this quasi-mathematical philosophy of language through a model-theoretical analysis of analytic truth in modal ...


'Listen To What You Say': Rwanda’S Postgenocide Language Policies, Lynne Tirrell 2015 University of Massachusetts Boston

'Listen To What You Say': Rwanda’S Postgenocide Language Policies, Lynne Tirrell

New England Journal of Public Policy

Freedom of expression is considered a basic human right, and yet most countries have restrictions on speech they deem harmful. Following the genocide of the Tutsi, Rwanda passed a constitution (2003) and laws against hate speech and other forms of divisionist language (2008, 2013). Understanding how language shaped “recognition harms” that both constitute and fuel genocide also helps account for political decisions to limit “divisionist” discourse. When we speak, we make expressive commitments, which are commitments to the viability and value of ways of speaking. This article explores reasons a society would decide to say, “We don’t talk that ...


On Philosophical Intuitions, Nicholas D. McGinnis 2015 The University of Western Ontario

On Philosophical Intuitions, Nicholas D. Mcginnis

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

I will argue that the scientific investigation of philosophical intuition ('experimental philosophy') is of philosophical interest. I will defend the significance of experimental philosophy against two important types of objection. I will term the first objection 'eliminativism' about intuitions: roughly, it is the claim that philosophical methodology does not in fact rely on intuition, and thus experimental philosophy's investigation is ill-conceived—in the words of one such opponent, 'a big mistake.' I will then consider a second objection, the 'expertise' defence. The expertise defence argues that the expert intuitions of professional philosophers are distinct, and to be preferred to ...


1. What Is The Relationship Of The Finite Subject To The Infinite Ground? 2. How Do We Use Where We Segregate The Subject From The Ground To Construct Reality? 3. In What Ways Can We Destabilize This Constructed Reality To Highlight Its Inherent Instability?, Calvin M. Miceli-Nelson 2015 Washington University in St Louis

1. What Is The Relationship Of The Finite Subject To The Infinite Ground? 2. How Do We Use Where We Segregate The Subject From The Ground To Construct Reality? 3. In What Ways Can We Destabilize This Constructed Reality To Highlight Its Inherent Instability?, Calvin M. Miceli-Nelson

Undergraduate Theses—Unrestricted

This essay catalogs interests within my works and traces connections between these works and particular structuralist, post-modern, and post-structuralist themes. Artists influential to or congruent with the aims of my work are also discussed within this three-part essay around these discussions present in my work: 1. What is the relationship of the finite subject to the infinite ground? 2. How do we use where we segregate the subject from the ground to construct reality? 3. In what ways can we destabilize this constructed reality to highlight its inherent instability?


Wittgenstein And The Problem Of Abusive Language, Alexander S. Coppins 2015 Macalester College

Wittgenstein And The Problem Of Abusive Language, Alexander S. Coppins

Philosophy Honors Projects

These days, more and more social movements are focusing on changing the ways we speak. As a result of these movements, words that were once commonplace until quite recently are being pushed out of our language because of their power to hurt people. This tells us that political groups recognize the power of words to greatly damage us. In this paper, I explore Wittgenstein’s philosophy of language in order to shed light on how we can use language to insult each other. Both the early and the later Wittgenstein are able to account, in some respects, for how we ...


Presence-At-Hand, Eric Lyle Schultz 2015 Washington University in St Louis

Presence-At-Hand, Eric Lyle Schultz

Graduate School of Art Theses

Abstract

The writing that follows is intended to provide a theoretical framework for the motives behind my practice. The primary concerns addressed are the reception, transmission, and physical shape of knowledge. I will discuss a human condition that exists as a byproduct of both the legacy of representation as well as the innate biology of the brain. I will argue that as a society we are governed by the residue of an extreme logic, and that this condition places severe margins on our potential for creative solutions. I will propose that our ability to create meaning is stifled by the ...


Hyperreality & Spectacular Social Ontology: Reexamining Baudrillard, Debord, & Searle, Nathan D. Ward 2015 Georgia State University

Hyperreality & Spectacular Social Ontology: Reexamining Baudrillard, Debord, & Searle, Nathan D. Ward

Georgia State Undergraduate Research Conference

No abstract provided.


Auctor In Fabula: Umberto Eco And The Intentio Of Foucault's Pendulum, Douglas Stephens IV 2015 Liberty University

Auctor In Fabula: Umberto Eco And The Intentio Of Foucault's Pendulum, Douglas Stephens Iv

Senior Honors Theses

Umberto Eco’s 1988 novel Foucault’s Pendulum weaves together a wide range of philosophical and literary threads. Many of these threads find their other ends in Eco’s nonfiction works, which focus primarily on the question of interpretation and the source of meaning. The novel, which follows three distinctly overinterpretive characters as they descend into ruin, has been read by some as a retraction or parody of Eco’s own position. However, if Foucault’s Pendulum is indeed polemical, it must be taken as an argument against the mindset which Eco has termed the “hermetic”. Through an examination of ...


The Stakes Of Spinoza’S Language: A Moderate Necessitarian Understanding Of 'Ethics' And Spinoza’S Conception Of Freedom As Both Positive And Negative Liberty, Jeffrey J. Horvath 2015 Gettysburg College

The Stakes Of Spinoza’S Language: A Moderate Necessitarian Understanding Of 'Ethics' And Spinoza’S Conception Of Freedom As Both Positive And Negative Liberty, Jeffrey J. Horvath

Student Publications

This paper explores different readings of Spinoza's "Ethics" with a specific focus on Spinoza's understanding of the relationship between infinite and finite modes in his constructed universe. These different readings suggest that Spinoza's conception of human freedom can be read both as examples of positive liberty and negative liberty.


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