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Is Justification Knowledge?, Brent J C Madison 2010 University of Notre Dame Australia

Is Justification Knowledge?, Brent J C Madison

Philosophy Papers and Journal Articles

Analytic epistemologists agree that, whatever else is true of epistemic justification, it is distinct from knowledge. However, if recent work by Jonathan Sutton is correct, this view is deeply mistaken, for according to Sutton justification is knowledge. That is, a subject is justified in believing that ρ iff he knows that ρ. Sutton further claims that there is no concept of epistemic justification distinct from knowledge. Since knowledge is factive, a consequence of Sutton’s view is that there are no false justified beliefs.

Following Sutton, I will begin by outlining kinds of beliefs that do not constitute knowledge but ...


Heidegger’S Notion Of Religion: The Limits Of Being-Understanding, Angus Brook 2010 University of Notre Dame Australia

Heidegger’S Notion Of Religion: The Limits Of Being-Understanding, Angus Brook

Philosophy Papers and Journal Articles

In the last two decades, the question of religion has become a central concern of many philosophers belonging to the Continental philosophical tradition. As the interest in religion has grown within Continental philosophy, so also has the question of Martin Heidegger’s relationship with religion. This paper poses the question of what religion meant to Martin Heidegger in the development of phenomenology as ontology; how he preconceived the notion of religion and why he eventually denied any authenticity to religion. In engaging with this question, the paper will also attempt to disclose some delimitations of Heidegger’s approach to religion.


Mental Disorders And The "System Of Judgemental Responsibility", Anita L. Allen 2010 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Mental Disorders And The "System Of Judgemental Responsibility", Anita L. Allen

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Hidden Function Of Takings Compensation, Abraham Bell, Gideon Parchomovsky 2010 University of San Diego

The Hidden Function Of Takings Compensation, Abraham Bell, Gideon Parchomovsky

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Rightly Or For Ill: The Ethics Of Remembering And Forgetting, Alison Nicole Crane Reinheld '93 2010 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Rightly Or For Ill: The Ethics Of Remembering And Forgetting, Alison Nicole Crane Reinheld '93

Doctoral Dissertations

Forgetting a birthday, a wedding anniversary, a beloved child's school play or a dear colleague's important accomplishments is often met with blame, whereas remembering them can engender praise. Are we in fact blameworthy or praiseworthy for such remembering and forgetting? When ought we to remember, in the ethical sense of 'ought'? And ought we in some cases to allow ourselves to forget?

These are the questions that ground this philosophical work. In fact, we so often unreflectively assign moral blame and praise to ourselves and others for memory behaviors that this faculty, and moral responsibility for it, deserve ...


Domination, Individuality, And Moral Chaos: Nietzsche’S Will To Power, Angel Cooper 2010 Bridgewater State University

Domination, Individuality, And Moral Chaos: Nietzsche’S Will To Power, Angel Cooper

Undergraduate Review

One of the most well known, but deeply debated, ideas presented by the philosopher, Friedrich Nietzsche, is the will to power. Scholars have provided a variety of interpretations for what Nietzsche means by this concept. In this paper, I argue that, under each interpretation, Nietzsche may still face what I call, the problem of moral chaos, or the problem of endorsing the claim that immoral acts, such as murder and torture, are justifiable as they exemplify the human will towards power over others. I ultimately argue that Nietzsche’s philosophy avoids this problem: though Nietzsche proposes it is possible to ...


On Constructive-Engagement Strategy Of Comparative Philosophy, Bo Mou 2010 San Jose State University

On Constructive-Engagement Strategy Of Comparative Philosophy, Bo Mou

Faculty Publications

In this journal theme introduction, first, I explain how comparative philosophy as explored in the journal Comparative Philosophy is understood and how it is intrinsically related to the constructive engagement strategy. Second, to characterize more clearly and accurately some related methodological points of the constructive-engagement strategy, and also to explain how constructive engagement is possible, I introduce some needed conceptual and explanatory resources and a meta-methodological framework and endeavor to identify adequacy conditions for methodological guiding principles in comparative studies. Third, as a case analysis, I show how the constructive-engagement reflective practice bears on recent studies of Chinese and comparative ...


Moral Markets: The Critical Role Of Values In The Economy By Paul J. Zak (Book Review), Jonathan B. Wight 2010 University of Richmond

Moral Markets: The Critical Role Of Values In The Economy By Paul J. Zak (Book Review), Jonathan B. Wight

Economics Faculty Publications

This volume contains the fruits of a two-year seminar on ethics and economics funded by the John Templeton Foundation and administered through the Gruter Institute for Law and Behavioral Research. Participants came from the social sciences, natural sciences, and humanities, and included Nobel Laureate Vernon Smith and other figures such as Frans de Waal, Herbert Gintis, Robert Frank, and Robert Solomon (for whom the book is dedicated in memoriam). The book’s editor, Paul Zak, is a pioneer in the emerging field of neuroeconomics, which uses medical technology to discover the physiological manifestations of cooperative and altruistic behavior. A theme ...


The Thinking Hand:Book Review, Jim Roche 2010 Dublin Institute of Technology

The Thinking Hand:Book Review, Jim Roche

Articles

In this new book Juhani Pallasmaa continues his phenomenological exploration begun in ‘The Eyes of the Skin (2005)’, with the ‘Thinking Hand’ here proffered as a metaphor for his contention that all our senses, have innate imbedded crucial skills which help us perform the most basic daily tasks – and to create inspired works of art and architecture.


Space, Time And The Constitution Of Subjectivity: Comparing Elias And Foucault, Paddy Dolan 2010 Dublin Institute of Technology

Space, Time And The Constitution Of Subjectivity: Comparing Elias And Foucault, Paddy Dolan

Articles

The work of Foucault and Elias has been compared before in the social sciences and humanities, but here I argue that the main distinction between their approaches to the construction of subjectivity is the relative importance of space and time in their accounts. This is not just a matter of the “history of ideas,” as providing for the temporal dimension more fully in theories of subjectivity and the habitus allows for a greater understanding of how ways of being, acting and feeling in different spaces are related but largely unintended. Here I argue that discursive practices, governmental operations and technologies ...


Worlds Apart In The Curriculum: Heidegger, Technology, And The Poietic Attunement Of Art, James Magrini 2010 College of DuPage

Worlds Apart In The Curriculum: Heidegger, Technology, And The Poietic Attunement Of Art, James Magrini

Philosophy Scholarship

Margonis (1986) criticizes Heidegger’s philosophy and those who would attempt to adopt his views for the purpose of thinking education because of the "abstract nature of his discussions," which suggest "proposals regarding our political, economic and educational lives from the place of metaphysical argumentation" (p. 125). To the contrary, Dwyer, et al (1988) claim the Heidegger’s philosophy, "clearly suggests an educational theory" (p. 100). This, is perhaps an overly optimistic claim, for it glosses over the difficulty associated with plumbing the depths of Heidegger’s vast corpus in order to speculate on the legitimate potential his philosophy has ...


Prayer And Subjective Well-Being: An Examination Of Six Different Types Of Prayer, Bramdon L. Whittington, Steven J. Scher 2010 Eastern Illinois University

Prayer And Subjective Well-Being: An Examination Of Six Different Types Of Prayer, Bramdon L. Whittington, Steven J. Scher

Steven J. Scher

Participants (N = 430) were recruited online and completed a measure of six prayer types (adoration, confession, thanksgiving, supplication, reception, and obligatory prayer). Measures of subjective well-being (self-esteem, optimism, meaning in life, satisfaction with life) were also administered. Three forms of prayer (adoration, thanksgiving, reception) had consistently positive relations with well-being measures, whereas the other three forms of prayer had negative or null relations with the well-being measures. The prayer types having positive effects appear to be less ego-focused, and more focused on God, whereas the negative types have an opposite nature. These results highlight the role of psychological meaning as ...


Moral Foundation Theory And The Law, Colin Prince 2010 Seattle University School of Law

Moral Foundation Theory And The Law, Colin Prince

Seattle University Law Review

Moral foundation theory argues that there are five basic moral foundations: (1) harm/care, (2) fairness/reciprocity, (3) ingroup/loyalty, (4) authority/respect, and (5) purity/sanctity. These five foundations comprise the building blocks of morality, regardless of the culture. In other words, while every society constructs its own morality, it is the varying weights that each society allots to these five universal foundations that create the variety. Haidt likens moral foundation theory to an “audio equalizer,” with each culture adjusting the sliders differently. The researchers, however, were not content to simply categorize moral foundations—they have tied the foundations ...


La « Technesthétique » : Répétition, Habitude Et Dispositif Technique Dans Les Arts Romantiques, John Tresch 2010 University of Pennsylvania

La « Technesthétique » : Répétition, Habitude Et Dispositif Technique Dans Les Arts Romantiques, John Tresch

Departmental Papers (HSS)

Français

En 1843, le physicien André-Marie Ampère décrit une nouvelle science, la « technesthétique », qui porte sur les « moyens par lesquels l’homme agit sur l’intelligence ou la volonté des autres hommes ». Cette nouvelle science correspond à la recherche des artistes romantiques pour des nouveaux effets et à leur fascination pour la puissance transformatrice de l’industrie. Comme une traduction théorique de ces obsessions, les lecteurs « mineurs » du philosophe Maine de Biran – y compris Ampère, Alexandre Bertrand, Moreau du Tours et Félix Ravaisson – ont avancé des analyses des interactions dynamiques entre le mouvement et la pensée, la matière et l ...


Prayer And Subjective Well-Being: An Examination Of Six Different Types Of Prayer, Bramdon L. Whittington, Steven J. Scher 2010 Eastern Illinois University

Prayer And Subjective Well-Being: An Examination Of Six Different Types Of Prayer, Bramdon L. Whittington, Steven J. Scher

Faculty Research and Creative Activity

Participants (N = 430) were recruited online and completed a measure of six prayer types (adoration, confession, thanksgiving, supplication, reception, and obligatory prayer). Measures of subjective well-being (self-esteem, optimism, meaning in life, satisfaction with life) were also administered. Three forms of prayer (adoration, thanksgiving, reception) had consistently positive relations with well-being measures, whereas the other three forms of prayer had negative or null relations with the well-being measures. The prayer types having positive effects appear to be less ego-focused, and more focused on God, whereas the negative types have an opposite nature. These results highlight the role of psychological meaning as ...


On The Appreciation Of Cinematic Adaptations, Paisley Nathan LIVINGSTON 2010 Lingnan University, Hong Kong

On The Appreciation Of Cinematic Adaptations, Paisley Nathan Livingston

Staff Publications

This article explores basic constraints on the nature and appreciation of cinematic adaptations. An adaptation, it is argued, is a work that has been intentionally based on a source work and that faithfully and overtly imitates many of this source's characteristic features, while diverging from it in other respects. Comparisons between an adaptation and its source(s) are essential to the appreciation of adaptations as such. In spite of many adaptation theorists' claims to the contrary, some of the comparisons essential to the appreciation of adaptations as such pertain to various kinds of fidelity and to the ways in ...


Environmental Virtue Ethics: Core Concepts And Values, Mark H. Dixon 2010 Ohio Northern University

Environmental Virtue Ethics: Core Concepts And Values, Mark H. Dixon

Philosophy and Religion Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Competing Theories Of Blackmail: An Empirical Research Critique Of Criminal Law Theory, Paul H. Robinson, Michael T, Cahill, Daniel M. Bartels 2010 University of Pennsylvania

Competing Theories Of Blackmail: An Empirical Research Critique Of Criminal Law Theory, Paul H. Robinson, Michael T, Cahill, Daniel M. Bartels

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Blackmail, a wonderfully curious offense, is the favorite of clever criminal law theorists. It criminalizes the threat to do something that would not be criminal if one did it. There exists a rich literature on the issue, with many prominent legal scholars offering their accounts. Each theorist has his own explanation as to why the blackmail offense exists. Most theories seek to justify the position that blackmail is a moral wrong and claim to offer an account that reflects widely shared moral intuitions. But the theories make widely varying assertions about what those shared intuitions are, while also lacking any ...


Reorientation Through Interruption: On The Relation Of Immanuel Kant's Modes Of Egoism To His Critical Philosophy, Giancarlo Tarantino 2010 Loyola University Chicago

Reorientation Through Interruption: On The Relation Of Immanuel Kant's Modes Of Egoism To His Critical Philosophy, Giancarlo Tarantino

Master's Theses

The relationship between Immanuel Kant's anthropology, and his Critical philosophy has proven to be a notoriously difficult problem, both for specifically Kantian scholarship as well as for philosophy in general. This thesis attempts to investigate this relationship by showing the importance of Kant's modes of egoism at work in his three Critiques. In doing so this thesis will highlight the phenomena of interruption, and orientation as playing crucial interpretive roles for parsing out the aforementioned relationship. I will try to show that anthropology and Critique mutually interrupt, and re-orient one another's specific contributions to the major themes ...


Method, Explanation, And Epistemic Justification In Historical Natural, Randy Krogstad 2010 University of Colorado at Boulder

Method, Explanation, And Epistemic Justification In Historical Natural, Randy Krogstad

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Philosophical analysis of scientific practice, methodology and theory has primarily focused on the classical experimental sciences, while little work has been done on other areas of science. Recently, philosophers have begun to address issues pertaining to scientific areas that do not fit the framework of the classical experimental sciences. This paper will address issues in the historical natural sciences and the historical aspects of earth science in particular. The historical claims made within the earth sciences face different methodological challenges, which require different forms of explanation and epistemic justification than those in the classical experimental sciences. A description of the ...


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