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HoʻOlohe I Nā Mele, Alualu Ka ManaʻO: Evaluating The Role Of Mele HawaiʻI In The Second Hawaiian Renaissance, Kale K.A. Kanaeholo 2017 University of Portland

HoʻOlohe I Nā Mele, Alualu Ka ManaʻO: Evaluating The Role Of Mele HawaiʻI In The Second Hawaiian Renaissance, Kale K.A. Kanaeholo

History Undergraduate Publications and Presentations

No abstract provided.


Away From The Plantation: An Ethnography Of Hawai'i Japanese American Identitiy In Honolulu Hawai'i, Nalani Noel Yukie Saito 2017 Dickinson College

Away From The Plantation: An Ethnography Of Hawai'i Japanese American Identitiy In Honolulu Hawai'i, Nalani Noel Yukie Saito

Student Honors Theses By Year

In this paper, I reconceptualize sugarcane plantations in Hawai‘i outside of a narrative of progress to explore the dynamisms of Hawai‘i Japanese American identity. These dynamisms emerge from the perspectives and family histories that Hawai‘i Japanese Americans shared with me in interviews, as part of research conducted in O‘ahu, Hawai‘i in 2016. To situate these dynamisms, I first focus on the sugarcane plantations of Hawai‘i, which are often framed as the foundation of Hawai‘i Japanese American identity. Drawing upon Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing’s (2015) theoretical framing of mushrooms, I interpret plantations as mobile ...


The Authenticity Of Hula In Japan, Gianne Shelby Pabustan 2017 Western Oregon University

The Authenticity Of Hula In Japan, Gianne Shelby Pabustan

Honors Senior Theses/Projects

The purpose of this thesis project will be to investigate Hawaiian culture’s emergence— through hula specifically—in Japanese culture and how Japanese culture has adapted to it. Specifically, this project will focus on whether hula in Japan remains pure and close to its Hawaiian roots rather than transformed. Hawaii and Japan are both island cultures, but differences have developed in how hula is portrayed, whether it be more for the entertainment aspect or the cultural aspect. In hula, numerous performance elements symbolize aspects of Hawaiian culture: from the formation of the dancers (representing working together in a community) to ...


World Churches Vertical File, Mac Ice 2016 Abilene Christian University

World Churches Vertical File, Mac Ice

Center for Restoration Studies Vertical Files Finding Aids

This set of files is especially useful to scholars of the history missions, particularly among Churches of Christ in the twentieth century. Students and researchers interested in applied missiology among Restorationist traditions, Stone-Campbell movements, and Churches of Christ will also find them helpful. For assistance with specific files or items, contact Mac Ice - mac.ice@acu.edu, or 325.674.2144.


Review Of Island Queens And Mission Wives: How Gender And Empire Remade Hawai‘I’S Pacific World, By Jennifer Thigpen, Margaret D. Jacobs 2016 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Review Of Island Queens And Mission Wives: How Gender And Empire Remade Hawai‘I’S Pacific World, By Jennifer Thigpen, Margaret D. Jacobs

Faculty Publications, Department of History

In Island Queens and Mission Wives, Jennifer Thigpen argues persuasively for the centrality of women and gender to the encounter between missionaries and Native Hawaiians in the nineteenth century. ... Thigpen offers new contributions to scholarship on missionary enterprises and colonialism by offering close readings of on-the-ground relationships between missionary and Hawaiian women. She successfully shows how women’s cross-cultural relationships within intimate settings became significant sites for the building of diplomatic and political alliances. ... Through its engagement with and extension of scholarship on gender and colonial encounters, Thigpen’s manuscript is a solid and engaging piece of historical scholarship.


Mala Lā’Au Lapa’Au: Preserving The Hawaiian ‘Āina And Mo’Omehue, Sandra Fogg 2015 University of Rhode Island

Mala Lā’Au Lapa’Au: Preserving The Hawaiian ‘Āina And Mo’Omehue, Sandra Fogg

Senior Honors Projects

The study of medicinal plants in the western world tends to focus on the isolation and elucidation of natural products that have bioactive characteristics and potential for pharmaceutical formulation. However, the utilization of medicinal plants in cultures that still practice ancient medicine, such as Hawai’i and other Pacific Island nations, involves the use of whole plant parts in conjunction with spiritual rituals to heal illnesses and ailments. In order to gather a different perspective of the use of plants in medicine, a diverse investigation of “Lā’au Lapa’au,” or the Hawaiian art of healing through the use of ...


Portraits Of Strangers, Dana Lotito 2015 William & Mary

Portraits Of Strangers, Dana Lotito

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This collection of five short stories explores various time periods and characters in Hawaii, France, and Tahiti. Rigorously researched, it explores themes such as contact between different communities and how that creates friction or harmony amongst the communities and challenges the identity of the people involved. Other themes are image permanence, lost paradise, and disappointment as a bridge or barrier to successful relationships.


Living Aloha: Portraits Of Resilience, Renewal, Reclamation, And Resistance, Camilla G. Wengler Vignoe 2015 Antioch University - PhD Program in Leadership and Change

Living Aloha: Portraits Of Resilience, Renewal, Reclamation, And Resistance, Camilla G. Wengler Vignoe

Dissertations & Theses

When Native Hawaiians move away from the islands, they risk losing their cultural identity and heritage. This dissertation utilizes a Hawaiian theoretical framework based in Indigenous research practices and uses phenomenology, ethnography, heuristics, and portraiture to tell the stories of leadership, change, and resilience of five Native Hawaiians who as adults, chose to permanently relocate to the United States mainland. It explores the reasons why Kanaka Maoli (politically correct term for Native Hawaiians) leave the 'āina (land; that which feeds) in the first place and eventually become permanent mainland residents. Some Hawaiians lose their culture after relocating to the United ...


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