Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Italian Language and Literature Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

469 Full-Text Articles 297 Authors 194,804 Downloads 80 Institutions

All Articles in Italian Language and Literature

Faceted Search

469 full-text articles. Page 7 of 13.

Trieste And The Context Of Italian Culture, Andrew L. Wyatt 2015 Kent State University - Kent Campus

Trieste And The Context Of Italian Culture, Andrew L. Wyatt

Undergraduate Research Symposium

Italian culture is widely popular and despite great complexity between regions, it is often stereotyped, particularly by Americans. My own travels to several major Italian cities shifted my perspective on Italy as a unified, homogenous nation to one that might be defined by fragmented micro-cultures with stronger regional ties than national ones. In order to account for this phenomenon, I have undertaken my own cultural study of Italy through Trieste, a city on the northeastern border. Initially exposed to Trieste through my research on the Triestine author Italo Svevo and his novel La Coscienza di Zeno, I visited the city ...


Crossing The Atlantic: Emilio Pettoruti's Italian Immersion, Lauren A. Kaplan 2015 CUNY Graduate Center

Crossing The Atlantic: Emilio Pettoruti's Italian Immersion, Lauren A. Kaplan

Artl@s Bulletin

The painter Emilio Pettoruti (1892-1971) was born to Italian parents in the Argentine province of La Plata. In 1913, he sailed to Florence for artistic training and remained in Europe for eleven years. This article focuses on this formative stint, during which Pettoruti studied Quattrocento masters, conferred with Italian Futurists, and met French Cubists. Ultimately, the painter became a paragon of civiltá italiana, a cosmopolitan culture born in Italy but meant for global dissemination. Upon returning to Buenos Aires in 1924, he exposing the Argentine public to this culture, strengthening the already robust bond between the two countries.


Africa, Asia, And The History Of Philosophy: Racism In The Formation Of The Philosophical Canon, 1780–1830 By Peter K.J. Park (Review), Joseph D. O'Neil 2015 University of Kentucky

Africa, Asia, And The History Of Philosophy: Racism In The Formation Of The Philosophical Canon, 1780–1830 By Peter K.J. Park (Review), Joseph D. O'Neil

Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Modernism And The Cult Of Mountains: Music, Opera, Cinema By Christopher Morris (Review), Harald Höbusch 2015 University of Kentucky

Modernism And The Cult Of Mountains: Music, Opera, Cinema By Christopher Morris (Review), Harald Höbusch

Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Facsimile Of Ljs 479, Moral Miscellany, Dot Porter 2015 University of Pennsylvania

Facsimile Of Ljs 479, Moral Miscellany, Dot Porter

Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies (SIMS): EBooks

No abstract provided.


Seminario: Culture Fasciste, Silvia Valisa 2015 Florida State University

Seminario: Culture Fasciste, Silvia Valisa

Silvia Valisa

No abstract provided.


Drawing Testimony, Coming To Writing: Ebe Cagli Seidenberg’S Le Sabbie Del Silenzio And Il Tempo Dei Dioscuri, Eveljn Ferraro 2015 Santa Clara Univeristy

Drawing Testimony, Coming To Writing: Ebe Cagli Seidenberg’S Le Sabbie Del Silenzio And Il Tempo Dei Dioscuri, Eveljn Ferraro

Modern Languages & Literature

This essay considers the question of how “coming to writing” describes the creative process, how mourning becomes language, and how the emptiness of silence turns into word, in relation to the life and literary work of Italian Jewish writer Ebe Cagli Seidenberg. In other words, how did Cagli’s exile to the U.S. facilitate her voice? And how did language become, for her, nothing less than a form of “country”? In examining her journey to testimonial writing, I contend that visual imagery—a combination of visual artifacts and visual memories—plays a major role in getting past the wall ...


Russian Folk Art By Alison Hilton (Review), Jeanmarie Rouhier-Willoughby 2015 University of Kentucky

Russian Folk Art By Alison Hilton (Review), Jeanmarie Rouhier-Willoughby

Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Final Pagan Generation By Edward J. Watts (Review), James A. Francis 2015 University of Kentucky

The Final Pagan Generation By Edward J. Watts (Review), James A. Francis

Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


The Obstacles To And Solutions Of Female Characters' Speech: Beatrice In Dante's Vita Nuova And Purgatorio And Susan In J. M. Coetzee's Foe, Tamara Savage 2015 Harvey Mudd College

The Obstacles To And Solutions Of Female Characters' Speech: Beatrice In Dante's Vita Nuova And Purgatorio And Susan In J. M. Coetzee's Foe, Tamara Savage

CMC Senior Theses

This thesis analyzes the speaking and silencing of two female characters, Beatrice from Dante’s Vita Nuova and Purgatorio and Susan from J. M. Coetzee’s Foe. The texts are viewed through postcolonial and feminist lenses to show the problems with male characters speaking for female characters and the obstacles the female characters face when attempting to speak. Dante’s solution to this problem is to transform Beatrice from a silent and demure woman into a character who issues commands with a powerful voice. Coetzee’s solution is instead to refuse to provide a solution, since no one but Susan ...


Speed And Convulsive Beauty: Trains And The Historic Avant-Garde, Marylaura Papalas 2015 East Carolina University

Speed And Convulsive Beauty: Trains And The Historic Avant-Garde, Marylaura Papalas

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

The train, an invention and evocative symbol of the 19th century, somewhat ironically continued to fascinate avant-garde artists and writers of the 20th century, when faster and more exciting modes of transportation were in use. Locomotive imagery in Italian futurism and French surrealism, however, demonstrates a lasting fascination with speed, locomotive space, and their effect on perceptions of reality. Considering the work of more recent theorists like Paul Virilio, Michel Foucault, and various others who have contributed to the growing field of mobility studies, this paper aims to understand the persisting presence of the train as a symbol ...


Documenting The (Un)Documented: Diasporic Ecuadorian Narratives In Southern/Mediterranean Europe, Esther A. Cuesta 2015 University of Massachusetts - Amherst

Documenting The (Un)Documented: Diasporic Ecuadorian Narratives In Southern/Mediterranean Europe, Esther A. Cuesta

Doctoral Dissertations

For several decades, Ecuadorian, U.S. American, and European social scientists have studied Ecuadorian migration to the European Union. Yet little academic research has been devoted to the comparative study of literary and filmic representations of diasporic Ecuadorians. This disparity between social science and literary studies research is especially evident in scholarship published in English, a gap this dissertation proposes to fill.

I investigate the discourses, cultural production, representations, and self-representations of diasporic Ecuadorians in Southern/Mediterranean Europe, specifically in Spain and Italy, where the largest diasporic communities of Ecuadorians in the European Union reside. I focus on a selection ...


Maquiavelo Y El Crecimiento Como Fin (Telos) Del Estado, William J. Connell 2014 Seton Hall University

Maquiavelo Y El Crecimiento Como Fin (Telos) Del Estado, William J. Connell

William Connell

There is a tradition of attempting to solve outstanding problems in the interpretation of Machiavelli by studying the context (historical and linguistic) of his works, with a particular focus on Machiavellis use of such «keywords» as stato and virtù. What is often neglected is the extent to which Machiavelli intentionally diverged from the meaning and usage of his contemporaries precisely when it came to using such important terms. Since Machiavelli was trying to break free of his «context» contextual readings need to take care not to flatten his meaning. An examination of Machiavellis use of stato in combination with words ...


The Multidimensional Quality Metric (Mqm) Framework: A New Framework For Translation Quality Assessment, Valerie Ruth Mariana 2014 Brigham Young University - Provo

The Multidimensional Quality Metric (Mqm) Framework: A New Framework For Translation Quality Assessment, Valerie Ruth Mariana

Theses and Dissertations

This document is a supplement to the article entitled “The Multidimensional Quality Metric (MQM) Framework: A New Framework for Translation Quality Assessment”, which has been acepted for publication in the upcoming January volume of JoSTrans, the Journal of Specialized Translation. The article is a coauthored project between Dr. Alan K. Melby, Dr. Troy Cox and myself. In this document you will find a preface describing the process of writing the article, an annotated bibliography of sources consulted in my research, a summary of what I learned, and a conclusion that considers the future avenues opened up by this research. Our ...


The Killing Machine Of Exception: Sovereignty, Law, And Play In Agamben’S State Of Exception, Puspa Damai 2014 Marshall University, Huntington, WV

The Killing Machine Of Exception: Sovereignty, Law, And Play In Agamben’S State Of Exception, Puspa Damai

Puspa Damai

Giorgio Agamben’s slender but profound monograph on the state of exception is an intervention into a world that is becoming more and more exceptionalist. The events of 9/11, the War on Terror, and the successive decrees and acts authorizing fingerprinting, interrogation, and indefinite detention of suspects in terrorist activities, all testify to Agamben’s prophetic portrayal of contemporary politics in which the state of exception—normally a provisional attempt to deal with political exigencies— has become a permanent practice or paradigm of government. When the exception becomes the rule, it results, argues Agamben, not only in the appropriation ...


Did One Veil Give Women A Better Life?, Mary C. Westermann 2014 Gettysburg College

Did One Veil Give Women A Better Life?, Mary C. Westermann

Student Publications

Unfortunately, a young woman in Renaissance Florence did not have many options for her future. A woman's family usually decided whether she would be able to get married or would have to enter the convent, but sometimes she was able to make this choice. In this paper, I look at the lives of wives and nuns to analyze how their lives differed in responsibilities and freedoms, but also to see how all women had similar restrictions and expectations placed upon them.


Dante And Islam, A Prose/Poem 6/19/2014, Charles Kay Smith 2014 University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Dante And Islam, A Prose/Poem 6/19/2014, Charles Kay Smith

Charles Kay Smith

In this poem, Dante is revealed as a scholar of Islamic literature who was influenced by two islamic texts about Muhammad's visits to Purgatory and Hell narrated in the The Isra, and whose visit to Paradise was recorded in The Mirage. The concept of Limbo introduced by Dante in his Divine Comedy was an Islamic/Christian hybrid new to his first readers.


The Social And Cultural Meanings Of Names In Late Antique Italy, 313-604, Eric Ware 2014 Western Michigan University

The Social And Cultural Meanings Of Names In Late Antique Italy, 313-604, Eric Ware

Master's Theses

This thesis examines many uses of names in Italian culture and society between the years 313 and 604. Through an anthroponymic study of names in Late Antique Italy, I explore the relationships between names and religion, social groups, gender, and language. I analyze the name patterns statistically and through micro-historical studies. This thesis argues that, contrary to studies emphasizing the late antique decline of the Roman trinominal system, Italian names demonstrated continuity with classical onomastic practices. The correlations between saint’s cults and local names and the decline of pagan names suggests that saints’ names replaced pagan ones as apotropaic ...


La Gioconda, Nikkole R. Jones 2014 University of New Orleans

La Gioconda, Nikkole R. Jones

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

Set in 16th century Florence, Italy, "La Gioconda" takes you on the journey of Lisa del Gioconda, the woman behind one of the most recognized paintings in the world, The Mona Lisa. Married off at a young age, Lisa finds comfort in her secret love affair with Art. Her secret world crosses paths with an Art apprentice, Leonardo da Vinci, who takes her on as his student. Lisa tells her husband that she is at church praying while spending her afternoons with Da Vinci, mastering her craft and technique. A love affair begins to blossom and Lisa is forced to ...


Bard In The Gondola, Barred In The Ghetto: Operatic Adaptations Of Shakespearean Text And Italian Identity In The Late Nineteenth Century, Anne M. Kehrli 2014 College of William and Mary

Bard In The Gondola, Barred In The Ghetto: Operatic Adaptations Of Shakespearean Text And Italian Identity In The Late Nineteenth Century, Anne M. Kehrli

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis, Bard in the Gondola, Barred in the Ghetto: Operatic Adaptations of Shakespearean Text and Italian Identity in the Late Nineteenth Century, is based on the comparison between two texts. The first is William Shakespeare’s first quarto edition of The Merchant of Venice. The second is the 1873 vocal score and libretto of Ciro Pinsuti and G.T. Cimino’s opera, Il Mercante di Venezia: un melodramma in quattro atti. The contrast between the two works is made within the context of Italian unification, nationalism and identity juxtaposed with the literary and philosophical trends of the nineteenth century ...


Digital Commons powered by bepress