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"Is Kentucky A Southern State?", Leah Dale Pritchett 2010 Western Kentucky University

"Is Kentucky A Southern State?", Leah Dale Pritchett

Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

his paper explores the cultural identity of Kentucky. Many people have asked, “Is Kentucky as Southern State?” Being the borderland between the North and the South, the Commonwealth has been viewed as Southern, as part of the Midwest, and something completely unique. To define Kentucky as Southern, I have examined the literary works of different regional authors. Looking at the character traits those authors have relegated to their manufactured people, I have decided, from the evidence provided, whether that author considers his or her setting as part of the South. One can tell whether the author identifies with the South ...


To Live And Die In Dixie: Robert E. Lee And Confederate Nationalism, Jacob A. Glover 2010 Western Kentucky University

To Live And Die In Dixie: Robert E. Lee And Confederate Nationalism, Jacob A. Glover

Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

Robert E. Lee is undeniably one of the most revered figures in American history, and yet despite the adoration awarded to the man over the years, surprisingly little scholarly research has dedicated itself to an inquiry into his nationalistic leanings during the four most important years of his life—the Civil War. In fact, Lee was a dedicated Confederate nationalist during his time in service to the Confederacy, and he remained so for the rest of his life, even after his surrender at Appomattox and the taking of an oath to regain his United States citizenship. Lee identified strongly with ...


"The Last Full Measure Of Devotion": The Battle Of Gettysburg And The New Museum In Schmucker Hall, Bradley R. Hoch, Gerald Christianson 2010 Gettysburg College

"The Last Full Measure Of Devotion": The Battle Of Gettysburg And The New Museum In Schmucker Hall, Bradley R. Hoch, Gerald Christianson

Adams County History

Schmucker Hall offers an unprecedented opportunity to interpret the role of religion in the Civil War and the American expenment in democracy. In particular it can give palpable expression to major themes in Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address concerning the battle itself, the conflict as a time of testing, the sacrifices of those who fought here, and the hope these sacrifices bring to the young nation for a new birth of freedom.

Built in 1832 and named for an abolitionist and founder of Gettysburg Seminary, Samuel Simon Schmucker, it is the original structure on the oldest continuously-operating Lutheran seminary in ...


Book Review: The Ordeal Of Thomas Barton: Anglican Missionary In The Pennsylvania Backcountry, 1755-1780, David L. Preston 2010 Gettysburg College

Book Review: The Ordeal Of Thomas Barton: Anglican Missionary In The Pennsylvania Backcountry, 1755-1780, David L. Preston

Adams County History

The Ordeal of Thomas Barton is a highly informative read that I recommend for anyone interested in the history of eighteenth-century Pennsylvania. Scholars will find the book useful for its many connections to the histories of settlement, religion, politics, Indian diplomacy, and warfare on the Pennsylvania frontier. The book's author, Gettysburg College English professor James P. Myers, Jr., has written the most deeply researched account of Barton's importance in eighteenth-century religion and politics, and has contributed some of the finest overall scholarship on early Pennsylvania in recent years. Based in Huntington Township in what is now Adams County ...


Mapping Gettysburg: Baltimore Street In 1910, Danielle C. Hiss, Megan L. Gray 2010 Gettysburg College

Mapping Gettysburg: Baltimore Street In 1910, Danielle C. Hiss, Megan L. Gray

Adams County History

In 1910, the town of Gettysburg was a thriving, bustling place. The Civil War was long over, and the town had begun to profit from tourists who wished to see the site of the famous battle. Business boomed. Merchants moved in and out of buildings and young families set up housekeeping in their own homes, raising their children and getting off to a running start in their chosen professions. There were cars in the streets next to the old horse-drawn buggies and electricity had begun to replace the gas lamps and candles of the Victorian era. For all that the ...


'Not Yet Ready': Australian University Libraries And Carnegie Corporation Philanthropy, 1935-1945, Michael J. Birkner 2010 Gettysburg College

'Not Yet Ready': Australian University Libraries And Carnegie Corporation Philanthropy, 1935-1945, Michael J. Birkner

History Faculty Publications

In recent years the Carnegie Corporation's influence on Australian library development has been fruitfully examined from many angles, among them its role in promoting free-library movements in the various states. One piece of the story, however, remains mostly in the shadows: the Corporation's initiatives pointing towards modernizing and professionalizing Australian university libraries. Although the Corporation's philanthropic enterprise at the university level yielded mixed results at best, it was not inconsequential. It provided a blueprint for future university-library development in Australia. In one instance, at the University of Melbourne, it inspired a vice-chancellor to articulate a vision of ...


Past Tense, 2010, Retired Association of Portland State 2010 Portland State University

Past Tense, 2010, Retired Association Of Portland State

Past Tense columns of the RAPS Sheet

January, 2010 "PSU and the Nike Swoosh"

February, 2010 "Florestan Trio enriches PSU"

March, 2010 "Ferdinand Society"

April, 2010 "Dick Halley: GI to PSU"

May, 2010 "An Offensive Outburst"

June, 2010 "Vikings Outlast Ducks"

September, 2010 "Portland State College's first president"

October, 2010 "Building a library from scratch . . . Twice"

November, 2010 "Remembering Kathy Greey: the Quintessential Academic Librarian"

December, 2010 "The mad dash between State Hall and Old Main"


Bailey, Winford Green, 1803-1883 (Sc 2243), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2010 Western Kentucky University

Bailey, Winford Green, 1803-1883 (Sc 2243), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

MSS Finding Aids

Finding aid, original letter (click on Additional Files below), and typescript (click on Additional Files below) for Manuscripts Small Collection 2243. Letter from Winford Green Bailey, in Stanford, Kentucky, to his brother Hartwell A. Bailey. He expresses concern over news of Hartwell's ill health, reports on financial matters pertaining to the settlement of their father's estate, and reflects at length on his sadness over the sale of the the family homestead.


Sacred Spaces, Public Places: The Intersection Of Religion And Space In Three Chicago Communities, 1869-1932, Elizabeth Hoffman Ransford 2010 Loyola University Chicago

Sacred Spaces, Public Places: The Intersection Of Religion And Space In Three Chicago Communities, 1869-1932, Elizabeth Hoffman Ransford

Dissertations

Manifestations of religion in the built environment and in conceptions of space illuminate a variety of cultural impulses. As the most tangible display of religion on the landscape, religious structures embody and shape the theological understandings, cultural assumptions, and social aspirations of believers; sacred buildings convey how congregations perceive themselves and how they aspire to be perceived by others. Moreover, because houses of worship serve as visible markers of the cultural authority and political status of their builders, religious structures also reflect the secular values and aesthetic fashions of the public sphere. In less materially tangible ways, religious groups' engagement ...


Wampum: The Transfer And Creation Of Rituals On The Early American Frontier, Paul Otto 2010 George Fox University

Wampum: The Transfer And Creation Of Rituals On The Early American Frontier, Paul Otto

Faculty Publications - Department of History, Politics, and International Studies

No abstract provided.


John F. Kennedy History, Memory, Legacy: An Interdisciplinary Inquiry, John Delane Williams, Robert G. Waite, Gregory S. Gordon 2010 University of North Dakota

John F. Kennedy History, Memory, Legacy: An Interdisciplinary Inquiry, John Delane Williams, Robert G. Waite, Gregory S. Gordon

Open Educational Resources

On September 25, 1963, President John F. Kennedy traveled to Grand Forks, North Dakota, greeted its citizens while touring the city, and delivered a speech at the University of North Dakota Field House, which addressed important issues still vital today: environmental protection, conservation of natural resources, economic development, the struggle between democracy and totalitarianism, and the importance of education and public service. The University conferred on the President an honorary Doctor of Laws degree. Over 20,000 people assembled on campus that day to see JFK -- the largest campus gathering in UND history. Tragically, less than two months later, the ...


Ua68/9/2 The Symphony, Bowling Green Western Symphony Orchestra 2010 Western Kentucky University

Ua68/9/2 The Symphony, Bowling Green Western Symphony Orchestra

WKU Archives Records

Program outlining the 2010-11 season of the Bowling Green Western Symphony Orchestra. Includes article by Jonathan Jeffrey entitled "Homecoming" regarding the return to the renovated Van Meter Hall. Also a description of the Pre-College Strings Program.


Welsh Americans: A History Of Assimilation In The Coalfields, Ron Roberts 2010 University of Northern Iowa

Welsh Americans: A History Of Assimilation In The Coalfields, Ron Roberts

The Annals of Iowa

Review of: "Welsh Americans: A History of Assimilation in the Coalfields," by Ronald L. Lewis.


Minor Courts And Communities At The Frontier: The Justice Of The Peace In Early Missouri, Bonnie Aileen Speck 2010 Wayne State University

Minor Courts And Communities At The Frontier: The Justice Of The Peace In Early Missouri, Bonnie Aileen Speck

Wayne State University Dissertations

ABSTRACT

MINOR COURTS AND COMMUNITIES AT THE FRONTIER JUSTICES OF THE PEACE IN EARLY MISSOURI

by

BONNIE A. SPECK

May 2011

Advisor: Sandra VanBurkleo

Major: American Legal and Constitutional History

Degree: History

This study focused on local and county courts operated by Missouri's justices of the peace between the Louisiana Purchase and roughly 1875. Its purpose was to investigate the role of township justices’ courts and county courts of commissioners in terms of interactions with local residents; effects of rulings and other court actions on everyday affairs; and wider impacts on Missouri society. Sources included territorial and state laws ...


Fighting For Survival: Coal Miners And The Struggle Over Health And Safety In The United States, 1968-1988, Richard Fry 2010 Wayne State University

Fighting For Survival: Coal Miners And The Struggle Over Health And Safety In The United States, 1968-1988, Richard Fry

Wayne State University Dissertations

My dissertation focuses on coal mining and occupational health and safety in the United States from 1968 to 1985. In the late 1960s, coal miners faced the constant risk of injury, occupational disease, and death. The dangerous conditions in the coal industry resulted in a massive explosion at the Farmington mine in West Virginia in 1968, which killed 78 miners. The Farmington disaster spurred miners to campaign for the reform of state and federal coal mine health and safety laws in the United States. They rejected the national leadership of their union, the United Mine Workers (UMW), which they perceived ...


The Rise Of Public Sector Unionism In Detroit, 1947-1967, Louis Eugene Jones 2010 Wayne State University

The Rise Of Public Sector Unionism In Detroit, 1947-1967, Louis Eugene Jones

Wayne State University Dissertations

In 1947, the Michigan Legislature passed into law the Hutchinson Act banning strikes of state and local workers. The law provided for the termination of striking public sector workers but did not require state and local agencies to bargain with public employees or their representatives. It even allowed for fines and prison sentences for non public sector workers who influenced public sector workers to strike. The law forced public sector unions into an untenable state of "collective begging." Indeed, it was often referred to as punitive and draconian. 18 years later, the Michigan Legislature passed and the governor signed into ...


Woman's Work: Female Lighthouse Keepers In The Early Republic, 1820–1859, Virginia Neal Thomas 2010 Old Dominion University

Woman's Work: Female Lighthouse Keepers In The Early Republic, 1820–1859, Virginia Neal Thomas

History Theses & Dissertations

During the Early Republic between 1820 and 1859, women, on average, comprised about five percent of the principal lighthouse keepers in the United States. These women represent a unique exception to the experience of the majority of working women during the Early Republic. They received equal pay to men, and some supervised lower-paid male assistants. They filled these predominately male positions because lighthouse work had much in common with stereotypical woman's work, they were most often related to the previous keeper, and they fit within cultural ideals of gender roles. Inquiry beyond the romantic image crafted for these light ...


Front Matter, 2010 Gettysburg College

Front Matter

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

Includes front cover, title page, list of editors, table of contents, and contributor biographies.


Letter From The Editor, Evan Rothera 2010 Gettysburg College

Letter From The Editor, Evan Rothera

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

No abstract provided.


The Visual Documentation Of Antietam: Peaceful Settings, Morbid Curiosity, And A Profitable Business, Kristilyn Baldwin 2010 Gettysburg College

The Visual Documentation Of Antietam: Peaceful Settings, Morbid Curiosity, And A Profitable Business, Kristilyn Baldwin

The Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era

On September 17, 1862, Confederate General Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia into Sharpsburg, Maryland to confront Federal General George McClellan and the Army of the Potomac. The battle that followed became the single bloodiest day in American history. There were approximately 25,000 American casualties and battlefields were left in desolation, strewn with corpses needing burial. The Battle of Antietam, or Sharpsburg, is a well-documented and important battle of the Civil War. Endless research has been done regarding its impact on the war, military strategies, and politics. However, there is a unique aspect of Antietam which ...


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