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The Railroads Must Have Ties: A Legal History Of Forest Conservation And The Oregon & California Railroad Land Grant, 1887-1916, Sean M. Kammer 2010 University of South Dakota School of Law

The Railroads Must Have Ties: A Legal History Of Forest Conservation And The Oregon & California Railroad Land Grant, 1887-1916, Sean M. Kammer

Dissertations, Theses, & Student Research, Department of History

Historians have! for the most part! left unchallenged a similar negative view of Edward H. Harriman, who headed both the Union Pacific and the Southern Pacific and was perhaps the most powerful of the railroad tycoons during the first decade of the twentieth century.4 Prior to Harriman's takeover of the Southern Pacific in 1901, that railroad's long-standing policy had been to subdivide and sell lands to farmers, miners, and loggers, the purpose being lito encourage long-term settlement, economic growth, and rail traffic," but Harriman questioned and ultimately rejected this policy.s In January 1903, he ordered the ...


It Hastened What We All Fought For, The End Of The War: General Sherman's Campaigns Through Atlanta, Georgia, And The Carolinas And How They Impacted The Civil War, Thomas J. Birmingham 2010 University of Nevada, Las Vegas

It Hastened What We All Fought For, The End Of The War: General Sherman's Campaigns Through Atlanta, Georgia, And The Carolinas And How They Impacted The Civil War, Thomas J. Birmingham

Calvert Undergraduate Research Awards

“It hastened what we all fought for, the end of the war: General Sherman’s campaigns through Atlanta, Georgia, and the Carolinas and how they impacted the Civil War” is my collection of research of the importance of Sherman’s campaigns through Atlanta, Georgia, and the Carolinas to bring the end of the war. My project is in fulfillment of the History 451: Proseminar within the requirements of a Bachelor’s Degree in history. My thesis paper covers those three campaigns and their importance in bringing the Civil War to an end. I have used primary and secondary evidence to ...


Fighting For Survival: Coal Miners And The Struggle Over Health And Safety In The United States, 1968-1988, Richard Fry 2010 Wayne State University

Fighting For Survival: Coal Miners And The Struggle Over Health And Safety In The United States, 1968-1988, Richard Fry

Wayne State University Dissertations

My dissertation focuses on coal mining and occupational health and safety in the United States from 1968 to 1985. In the late 1960s, coal miners faced the constant risk of injury, occupational disease, and death. The dangerous conditions in the coal industry resulted in a massive explosion at the Farmington mine in West Virginia in 1968, which killed 78 miners. The Farmington disaster spurred miners to campaign for the reform of state and federal coal mine health and safety laws in the United States. They rejected the national leadership of their union, the United Mine Workers (UMW), which they perceived ...


Protests In The Sixties, Kellie C. Sorey, Dennis Gregory 2010 Old Dominion University

Protests In The Sixties, Kellie C. Sorey, Dennis Gregory

Educational Foundations & Leadership Faculty Publications

The imminent philosopher George Santayana said, "Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it" (1905). The protests that occurred on American campuses in the 1960s may lend support for that statement. This article will describe major events of the protest movement during this period, describe the societal and institutional contexts within which these protests occurred, and will hopefully encourage student affairs professionals to examine the emerging student activism of today to avoid the mistakes of the past. Many of today's senior administrators and faculty were college students during the protest era. These authors suggest that ...


“The Base, Cursed Thing”: Panther Attacks, Ecotones, And Antebellum American Fiction, Matthew Sivils 2010 Iowa State University

“The Base, Cursed Thing”: Panther Attacks, Ecotones, And Antebellum American Fiction, Matthew Sivils

English Publications

The panther attack scenes found in the fiction of Charles Brockden Brown (1771-1810), James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851), and Harriet Prescott Spofford (1835-1921) portray these animals as literary monsters indicative of a developing American environmental anxiety. Drawing on a selection of recent critical studies dealing with both antebellum American fiction and ecocriticism, I suggest that these scenes reveal, especially through their depiction of panther attacks in what ecologists now refer to as anthropogenic ecotones (human-made environmental edges), the beginnings of an American cultural recognition of environmental degradation. Ultimately these panther attack scenes prefigure an American environmental ethic, revealing an instructive early ...


A Beer Party And Watermelon: The Archaeology Of Community And Resistance At Ccc Camp Zigzag, Company 928, Zigzag, Oregon, 1933-1942, Janna Beth Tuck 2010 Portland State University

A Beer Party And Watermelon: The Archaeology Of Community And Resistance At Ccc Camp Zigzag, Company 928, Zigzag, Oregon, 1933-1942, Janna Beth Tuck

Dissertations and Theses

In March 1933, the administration of United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt initiated a national relief program aimed at alleviating the disastrous effects ofthe Great Depression. The Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC) began as one of these programs designed to employ young men from all over the country and put them "back to work". The CCC provided these young men with training, a monthly stipend, and basic supplies such as food, clothing, and accommodations. After 1942, CCC camps were closed and many of these sites were abandoned or destroyed, leaving little historical documentation as to the experiences ofthe people involved. This ...


"Is Kentucky A Southern State?", Leah Dale Pritchett 2010 Western Kentucky University

"Is Kentucky A Southern State?", Leah Dale Pritchett

Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

his paper explores the cultural identity of Kentucky. Many people have asked, “Is Kentucky as Southern State?” Being the borderland between the North and the South, the Commonwealth has been viewed as Southern, as part of the Midwest, and something completely unique. To define Kentucky as Southern, I have examined the literary works of different regional authors. Looking at the character traits those authors have relegated to their manufactured people, I have decided, from the evidence provided, whether that author considers his or her setting as part of the South. One can tell whether the author identifies with the South ...


Building Bridges Between Archives And Indian Communities, Timothy B. Powell 2010 University of Pennsylvania

Building Bridges Between Archives And Indian Communities, Timothy B. Powell

Departmental Papers (Religious Studies)

The APS has a long, distinguished history of preserving Native American languages. It began when Thomas Jefferson was the President of the Society in the late eighteenth century. A new chapter in this history was written this past May at the “Building Bridges between Archives and Indian Communities” conference—the first time in more than two hundred years that a large number of Native Americans have been invited to the Library to reconnect with their heritage. It was my great privilege to organize the conference. As Larry Aitken, tribal historian from the Leech Lake band of Ojibwe, who performed the ...


Enemies Foreign And Domestic: Us Relations With Mormons In The Us Empire In North America, 1844-1854, Gerrit John Dirkmaat 2010 Individual

Enemies Foreign And Domestic: Us Relations With Mormons In The Us Empire In North America, 1844-1854, Gerrit John Dirkmaat

History Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This dissertation seeks to explain the causes and events leading to the alienation of Mormons from the United States government from 1844 to 1854 in the context of American political and diplomatic history. This study demonstrates how foreign policy goals and partisan political concerns caused federal officials to negotiate with Mormons as a foreign, rather than domestic, entity. These interactions were based upon fear and misinformation on both sides and were colored by the overwhelmingly negative view of Mormons in popular US culture. It will examine the Mormons in their unique role as both conquerors and conquered in western North ...


Dunmore's New World: Political Culture In The British Empire, 1745--1796, James Corbett David 2010 College of William & Mary - Arts & Sciences

Dunmore's New World: Political Culture In The British Empire, 1745--1796, James Corbett David

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Despite his participation in the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745, John Murray, fourth earl of Dunmore, eventually became royal governor of New York (1770-1771), Virginia (17711783), and the Bahama Islands (1787-1796). His life in the British Empire exposed him to an extraordinary range of political experience, including border disputes, land speculation, frontier warfare and diplomacy, sexual scandal, slave emancipation, naval combat, loyalist advocacy, Amerindian slavery, and trans-imperial filibusters, to say nothing of his proximity to the Haitian Revolution or his role in the defense of the British West Indies during the French Revolutionary Wars. Quick to break with convention on behalf ...


A Legacy Of Inaction, Robert Gordon Menna 2010 College of William & Mary - Arts & Sciences

A Legacy Of Inaction, Robert Gordon Menna

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Art, Mystery, And Occupation: Building Culture In Eighteenth-Century Williamsburg, Virginia, Elizabeth Cook 2010 College of William & Mary - Arts & Sciences

Art, Mystery, And Occupation: Building Culture In Eighteenth-Century Williamsburg, Virginia, Elizabeth Cook

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Traces Volume 38, Number 4, Kentucky Library Research Collections 2010 Western Kentucky University

Traces Volume 38, Number 4, Kentucky Library Research Collections

Traces, the Southern Central Kentucky, Barren County Genealogical Newsletter

Traces, the South Central Kentucky Genealogical Society's quarterly newsletter, was first published in 1973. The Society changed its name in 2016 to the Barren County Historical Society. The publication features compiled genealogies, articles on local history, single-family studies and unpublished source materials related to this area.


Witch Hunts: From Salem To Guantanamo Bay (Review), Michael D. Bailey 2010 Iowa State University

Witch Hunts: From Salem To Guantanamo Bay (Review), Michael D. Bailey

History Publications

The purpose of this odd book is to argue that, in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and the fear and extraordinary governmental responses they have generated, the modern Western world, and particularly the United States of America, is on the verge of (though not yet embroiled in) a new era of witch hunts. The modern malefactors are, obviously, supposed terrorists rather than supposed witches. Their means of bringing about death and destruction are guns, bombs, and biological devices, not spells and incantations. Yet Rapley argues over the course of twenty breathless chapters that a number of characteristics ...


Lincoln's Legacy Of Leadership, George R. Goethals, Gary L. McDowell 2010 University of Richmond

Lincoln's Legacy Of Leadership, George R. Goethals, Gary L. Mcdowell

Bookshelf

Through this in-depth look at Abraham Lincoln, both before and during his presidency, we can learn through his leadership in times of confusion, war, and dissent. The set of chapters included in this volume are based on papers that constituted part of the 2008-2009 Jepson Leadership Forum at the Jepson School of Leadership Studies at the University of Richmond. The chapters consider Lincoln’s intellectual, moral, political, and military leadership. The authors include the world’s foremost Lincoln scholars, including Pulitzer Prize winner Daniel Walker Howe, and Lincoln Prize winners Richard Carwardine and Douglas Wilson.


America On The Eve Of The Civil War, Edward L. Ayers, Carolyn R. Martin 2010 University of Richmond

America On The Eve Of The Civil War, Edward L. Ayers, Carolyn R. Martin

Bookshelf

The scholarship and public history the sixteen historians had created over their careers made this plan seem at least feasible. Their collective body of work embraces everything from politics to literature, from industrial slavery to African American art, from women's reform efforts to racial ideologies, from military history to the history of memory. Some of them worked at museums and libraries while others taught at universities and colleges across the nations. They belonged to no particular school of interpretation, and quite a few had never met one another.

The historians, whatever their backgrounds, shared a sense of responsibility for ...


The Rise Of Public Sector Unionism In Detroit, 1947-1967, Louis Eugene Jones 2010 Wayne State University

The Rise Of Public Sector Unionism In Detroit, 1947-1967, Louis Eugene Jones

Wayne State University Dissertations

In 1947, the Michigan Legislature passed into law the Hutchinson Act banning strikes of state and local workers. The law provided for the termination of striking public sector workers but did not require state and local agencies to bargain with public employees or their representatives. It even allowed for fines and prison sentences for non public sector workers who influenced public sector workers to strike. The law forced public sector unions into an untenable state of "collective begging." Indeed, it was often referred to as punitive and draconian. 18 years later, the Michigan Legislature passed and the governor signed into ...


Women In Antebellum Alachua County, Florida, Herbert Joseph O'Shields 2010 University of North Florida

Women In Antebellum Alachua County, Florida, Herbert Joseph O'Shields

UNF Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The purpose of this study was to investigate the role and status of women in Alachua County, Florida, from 1821 through 1860. The secondary literature suggests that women throughout America had virtually no public role to play in antebellum society except in limited circumstances in some mature urban, commercial settings. The study reviewed U.S. Census materials, slave ownership records, and land ownership records as a means to examine the family structures, the mobility and persistence of persons and households, and the economic status of women, particularly including woman headed households. The study also examined laws adopted by the Florida ...


Susanna Rowson’S Transatlantic Career, Melissa J. Homestead, Camryn Hansen 2010 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Susanna Rowson’S Transatlantic Career, Melissa J. Homestead, Camryn Hansen

Faculty Publications -- Department of English

The contention that Charlotte is best understood as part of Rowson’s career, a career that spanned a period of years and the Atlantic Ocean, is central to our analysis and to the recovery of Rowson’s authorial agency. In Women and Authorship in Revolutionary America, Angela Vietto argues for the importance of the “literary career” as a category of analysis for women, of “examinin[g] the course writers followed in their pursuit of writing as a vocation—their progress in a variety of kinds of projects, both in their texts and in their performances as authors” (91). Although we ...


Review Of Laura Ingalls Wilder And Rose Wilder Lane: Authorship, Place, Time, And Culture By John E. Miller, Philip Heldrich 2010 University of Washington Tacoma

Review Of Laura Ingalls Wilder And Rose Wilder Lane: Authorship, Place, Time, And Culture By John E. Miller, Philip Heldrich

Great Plains Quarterly

In his third book on Laura Ingalls Wilder, John E. Miller presents another fascinating study of this most cherished writer and her times. Miller weighs in on a number of the continuing controversies surrounding Wilder's books, foremost among them the question of how the Little House books were authored. He also enters into the continuing debate on the racial politics of Wilder's writing, especially in Little House on the Prairie, that has become the focus of many newer studies of Wilder's work. Miller presents Wilder and daughter Rose Wilder Lane as products of their respective times, showing ...


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