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“Go West Young Man, And Grow Up With This Country”: Settler Colonialism, Gender And Property, Connor Van Alstine 2019 University of Puget Sound

“Go West Young Man, And Grow Up With This Country”: Settler Colonialism, Gender And Property, Connor Van Alstine

Sociology & Anthropology Theses

As a theoretical starting point, this paper takes up Connell’s concept of hegemonic masculinity which posits that gender configurations are shifting and determined by whichever expectations best motivate behaviors that reinforce a hierarchical and complementary relation between genders. This hierarchical structure, following theorizations by Maria Lugones, is itself a product of the colonial encounter. With this in mind, this paper compares historical shifts in American gender configurations to the material demands of settlement. Utilizing existing research into settler gender identity between 1760 and 1870, it finds that the increasing emphasis on domesticity in gender discourses concretized gender configurations in ...


"Its Cargo Is People": Repositioning Commuter Rail As Public Transit To Save The New York–New Haven Line, 1960–1990, Seamus C. Joyce-Johnson 2019 Yale University

"Its Cargo Is People": Repositioning Commuter Rail As Public Transit To Save The New York–New Haven Line, 1960–1990, Seamus C. Joyce-Johnson

Harvey M. Applebaum ’59 Award

This essay explores the creation of the Metro-North Railroad in 1983 as a public agency to provide commuter train services on the New York–New Haven Line. The essay begins by bringing out the central role commuter rail services played in the negotiations over the New Haven Railroad’s bankruptcy in the 1960s. I argue that New Haven Line’s near liquidation during the bankruptcy prompted advocacy from commuters, urban planners, and politicians that pushed back against the trend towards automobile-centric urban transportation planning. In the next section, I use the New Haven Line’s subsequent operation in the 1970s ...


Receipt, 24 May 1843, John Allen, Timmons Louis Treadwell (1800-1870) 2019 University of Mississippi

Receipt, 24 May 1843, John Allen, Timmons Louis Treadwell (1800-1870)

Personal and Business Correspondence, 1841-1850 (Series 1.2)

No abstract provided.


Indenture, Marshall County, Ms, 1 August 1842, Holden Webb, William McLean 2019 University of Mississippi

Indenture, Marshall County, Ms, 1 August 1842, Holden Webb, William Mclean

Personal and Business Correspondence, 1841-1850 (Series 1.2)

No abstract provided.


Defying Mcculloch? Jackson’S Bank Veto Reconsidered, David S. Schwartz 2019 University of Wisconsin, Madison

Defying Mcculloch? Jackson’S Bank Veto Reconsidered, David S. Schwartz

Arkansas Law Review

On July 10, 1832, President Andrew Jackson issued the most famous and controversial veto in United States history. The bill in question was “to modify and continue” the 1816 “act to incorporate the subscribers to the Bank of the United States. This was to recharter of the Second Bank of the United States whose constitutionality was famously upheld in McCulloch v. Maryland. The bill was passed by Congress and presented to Jackson on July 4. Six days later, Jackson vetoed the bill. Jackson’s veto mortally wounded the Second Bank, which would forever close its doors four years later at ...


Overruling Mcculloch?, Mark A. Graber 2019 University of Marlyand, Baltimore

Overruling Mcculloch?, Mark A. Graber

Arkansas Law Review

Daniel Webster warned Whig associates in 1841 that the Supreme Court would likely declare unconstitutional the national bank bill that Henry Clay was pushing through the Congress. This claim was probably based on inside information. Webster was a close association of Justice Joseph Story. The justices at this time frequently leaked word to their political allies of judicial sentiments on the issues of the day. Even if Webster lacked first-hand knowledge of how the Taney Court would probably rule in a case raising the constitutionality of the national bank, the personnel on that tribunal provided strong grounds for Whig pessimism ...


M'Culloch In Context, Mark R. Killenbeck 2019 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

M'Culloch In Context, Mark R. Killenbeck

Arkansas Law Review

M’Culloch v. Maryland is rightly regarded as a landmark opinion, one that affirmed the ability of Congress to exercise implied powers, articulated a rule of deference to Congressional judgments about whether given legislative actions were in fact “necessary,” and limited the ability of the states to impair or restrict the operations of the federal government. Most scholarly discussions of the case and its legacy emphasize these aspects of the decision. Less common are attempts to place M’Culloch within the ebb and flow of the Marshall Court and the political and social realities of the time. So, for example ...


Mcculloch At 200, David S. Schwartz 2019 University of Wisconsin, Madison

Mcculloch At 200, David S. Schwartz

Arkansas Law Review

March 6, 2019 marked the 200th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s issuance of its decision in McCulloch v. Maryland, upholding the constitutionality of the Second Bank of the United States, the successor to Alexander Hamilton’s national bank. McCulloch v. Maryland involved a constitutional challenge by the Second Bank of the United States to a Maryland tax on the banknotes issued by the Bank’s Baltimore branch. The tax was probably designed to raise the Second Bank’s cost of issuing loans and thereby disadvantage it relative to Maryland’s own state-chartered banks. Marshall’s opinion famously rejected the ...


J.L. Edwards To Amelia Treadwell, 8 September, J. L. Edwards 2019 University of Mississippi

J.L. Edwards To Amelia Treadwell, 8 September, J. L. Edwards

Personal and Business Correspondence, 1841-1850 (Series 1.2)

No abstract provided.


Illustrated Card, "Amid The Duties Of Office, 1865", J. H. Crawford 2019 University of Mississippi

Illustrated Card, "Amid The Duties Of Office, 1865", J. H. Crawford

Personal and Business Correspondence, 1861-1870 (Series 1.4)

No abstract provided.


Indenture, Marshall County, Ms, March 1853, William A. Oates, Nancy L. Oates 2019 University of Mississippi

Indenture, Marshall County, Ms, March 1853, William A. Oates, Nancy L. Oates

Personal and Business Correspondence, 1851-1860 (Series 1.3)

No abstract provided.


Illustrated Album 1851-1858, Belonging To Lou Farabee, Lou Farabee 2019 University of Mississippi

Illustrated Album 1851-1858, Belonging To Lou Farabee, Lou Farabee

Personal and Business Correspondence, 1851-1860 (Series 1.3)

No abstract provided.


‘Do You Know Who You Are?’, Amanda Black 2019 University of Dayton

‘Do You Know Who You Are?’, Amanda Black

Amanda Black

As I reflect on Black History Month and how it has shaped and continues to shape American history, I’m struck with the importance of students getting to know their past. As they read about and witness injustices throughout the world, students have awakened to the realization that a fuller understanding the history of their own country can provide more detailed context for their own experiences. This type of research can not only provide a sense of identity, but also equip them with knowledge and perspective as they work to dismantle systems of inequality.


William Stedman To R.E. Aldrich, 2 December 1872, William Stedman 2019 University of Mississippi

William Stedman To R.E. Aldrich, 2 December 1872, William Stedman

Personal and Business Correspondence, 1871-1880 (Series 1.5)

No abstract provided.


William G. Reed To Mr. Aldrich, 29 November 1872, William G. Reed 2019 University of Mississippi

William G. Reed To Mr. Aldrich, 29 November 1872, William G. Reed

Personal and Business Correspondence, 1871-1880 (Series 1.5)

No abstract provided.


W.L. Treadwell To Lucy Treadwell, 29 October 1872, William Loundes Treadwell (1828-1908) 2019 University of Mississippi

W.L. Treadwell To Lucy Treadwell, 29 October 1872, William Loundes Treadwell (1828-1908)

Personal and Business Correspondence, 1871-1880 (Series 1.5)

No abstract provided.


Govan And Mosby To Long And Treadwell, 13 February 1872, Govan and Mosby 2019 University of Mississippi

Govan And Mosby To Long And Treadwell, 13 February 1872, Govan And Mosby

Personal and Business Correspondence, 1871-1880 (Series 1.5)

No abstract provided.


Italian Immigrants In The Early 20th Century And How They Have Impacted American Opinions On Immigration, Colleen Keating 2019 Providence College

Italian Immigrants In The Early 20th Century And How They Have Impacted American Opinions On Immigration, Colleen Keating

History Dissertations and Theses

No abstract provided.


Contemptible Cravens And Dumb Beasts: The Story Of The Wiggans Patch Massacre, Kevin Cranney 2019 Providence College

Contemptible Cravens And Dumb Beasts: The Story Of The Wiggans Patch Massacre, Kevin Cranney

History Dissertations and Theses

No abstract provided.


Complicated Lives: Free Blacks In Virginia, 1619-1865, Sherri L. Burr 2019 University of New Mexico School of Law

Complicated Lives: Free Blacks In Virginia, 1619-1865, Sherri L. Burr

Faculty Book Display Case

Would the United States have developed differently if Virginia had not passed a law in 1670 proclaiming all subsequently arriving Africans as servants for life, or slaves? What if the state had not stripped all Free Blacks and Indians of voting rights in 1723, or outlawed interracial sex for 337 years?

Complicated Lives upends the pervasive belief that all Africans landing on the shores of Virginia beginning in late August 1619, became slaves. In reality, many of these kidnap victims received the status of indentured servants. Indeed, hundreds of thousands of free African Americans in the South and North owned ...


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