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Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture Commons

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“Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?”: Freud And The Unconscious Of Paul Gauguin, Lauren Cavalli 2010 Providence College

“Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?”: Freud And The Unconscious Of Paul Gauguin, Lauren Cavalli

Art & Art History Student Papers

No abstract provided.


Book Review: Tilling The Hateful Earth: Agricultural Production And Trade In The Late Antique East By Michael Decker, David B. Hollander 2010 Iowa State University

Book Review: Tilling The Hateful Earth: Agricultural Production And Trade In The Late Antique East By Michael Decker, David B. Hollander

History Publications

Michael Decker's monograph examines late antique agriculture in the Roman diocese of Oriens, an administrative unit stretching along the Mediterranean coast from the Sinai Peninsula to southern Anatolia, extending to Mesopotamia in the East and embracing Cyprus to the West. Although mainly concerned with the period between 300 and 700 CE, the book has plenty to offer those interested in earlier periods of classical antiquity.


The Rhetoric Of Architecture And Memory Of The Holy Sepulchre In Byzantium, Jelena Bogdanović 2010 East Carolina University

The Rhetoric Of Architecture And Memory Of The Holy Sepulchre In Byzantium, Jelena Bogdanović

Jelena Bogdanović

The actual physical appearance of the Anastasis‐Golgotha complex in Jerusalem during Byzantine times is not documented archaeologically. The extent and significance of the Byzantine interventions between the seventh and eleventh centuries, after the destructions by the Persians, from earthquakes, and devastating fire set by the Caliph al‐Hākim in 1009, remain understudied. Presumably, after each destruction the first structure restored for veneration was the major locus sanctus, the Holy Sepulchre. Because it is doubtful that the Byzantines kept records on the architectural design of the Holy Sepulchre, their reconstructions were not based on a definite pictorial scheme, but rather ...


Heresy And Error, Eric Marshall White PhD, Rebecca Howdeshell 2010 Southern Methodist University

Heresy And Error, Eric Marshall White Phd, Rebecca Howdeshell

Bridwell Library Publications

From its inception the early Christian Church sought to suppress books believed to contain heretical or erroneous teachings. With the development of the printing press during the latter half of the fifteenth century, Christian authorities in Europe became increasingly aware of the need to control the mass production of unfamiliar and potentially unacceptable texts. Initially, censorship of the press was enforced locally. However, with the spread of the Protestant Reformation, the Catholic Church required a more centralized and organized approach. Thus, the Council of Trent (1545–1563) ratified the Index librorum prohibitorum(“Index of Prohibited Books”), which listed individual banned ...


Metallurgy In The Roman Forts Of Scotland: An Archaeological Analysis, Scott S. Stetkiewicz 2010 Rhode Island College

Metallurgy In The Roman Forts Of Scotland: An Archaeological Analysis, Scott S. Stetkiewicz

Honors Projects Overview

Investigates the presence of metalworking in thirty-seven Roman forts in Scotland during the Flavian, Antonine, and Severan occupations largely through analysis of published documentation concerning relevant archaeological excavations.


Architecture In Archaeology: An Examination Of Domestic Space In Bronze Age Mesopotamia, Megan E. Drennan 2010 University of Connecticut - Storrs

Architecture In Archaeology: An Examination Of Domestic Space In Bronze Age Mesopotamia, Megan E. Drennan

Honors Scholar Theses

The study of architecture within archaeology has not had a direct, well-defined history nor a singular academic pursuit. Yet over time, four branches have developed; they examine: 1) the object itself; structures as artifacts, 2) activity areas within a structure, 3) the specific way in which a building confines space, and 4) the relationship between human behavior and architecture.

This investigation surveys domestic space in the Bronze Age Mesopotamian urban centers of Tell Asmar, Nippur, and Ur. The analysis uses methods from the study of space, such as space syntax, access analysis, and visibility angles, to demonstrate the probability of ...


Masterpieces Of Italian Literature In Translation, Silvia Valisa 2010 Florida State University

Masterpieces Of Italian Literature In Translation, Silvia Valisa

Silvia Valisa

No abstract provided.


Medieval Synagogues In The Mediterranean Region, Samuel D. Gruber 2010 Syracuse University

Medieval Synagogues In The Mediterranean Region, Samuel D. Gruber

Religion

Throughout the Middle Ages, the synagogue developed as the central identifying institution and physical building for Jews, replacing the still yearned for but increasingly distant Jerusalem Temple as the focus of Jewish identity. Equally important, the synagogue became the symbol par excellance of the Jews and their community for the Christian (or Muslim) majority populations in the countries where Jews were settled. For Christians, the synagogue was a Jewish church, but much more so, it came to symbolize in opposition all that the church represented.

Though relatively little known today, medieval synagogues were not symbolic abstractions to the men and ...


Baciccio's Beata Ludovica Albertoni Distributing Alms, Karen J. Lloyd 2010 Chapman University

Baciccio's Beata Ludovica Albertoni Distributing Alms, Karen J. Lloyd

Art Faculty Articles and Research

This article focuses on the artistic relationship between Baciccio and Gian Lorenzo Bernini.


Stammheim Missal, Elizabeth Teviotdale 2009 Western Michigan University

Stammheim Missal, Elizabeth Teviotdale

Elizabeth C Teviotdale

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Typology, Elizabeth Teviotdale 2009 Western Michigan University

Typology, Elizabeth Teviotdale

Elizabeth C Teviotdale

Restricted access.


Eadwine Psalter, Elizabeth Teviotdale 2009 Western Michigan University

Eadwine Psalter, Elizabeth Teviotdale

Elizabeth C Teviotdale

Restricted access.


Pembroke College 302: Abbreviated Gospel Book Or Gospel Lectionary?, Elizabeth Teviotdale 2009 Western Michigan University

Pembroke College 302: Abbreviated Gospel Book Or Gospel Lectionary?, Elizabeth Teviotdale

Elizabeth C Teviotdale

A consideration of the character of the text of Cambridge, Pembroke College, MS 302, a series of excerpts from the four canonical Gospels in (with one exception) biblical order preceded by an incomplete set of canon tables, a manuscript produced in England in the mid-11th century. Concludes that it was probably created as a private devotional book for a high-ranking Benedictine monk, a prayer book intended to resemble a Gospel book and to present a full account of the life of Christ.


Federico Borromeo: Sacred Painting And Museum, Kenneth Rothwell, Pamela Jones 2009 University of Massachusetts Boston

Federico Borromeo: Sacred Painting And Museum, Kenneth Rothwell, Pamela Jones

Kenneth S Rothwell, Jr.

In these two Latin treatises, published in 1624 and 1625, Borromeo laid out his views on religious art and described the collection he was amassing for the newly founded Ambrosiana. Here is the page at HUP: http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?recid=29729


Revealing Iberian Woodcraft: Conserved Wooden Artefacts From South-East Spain, pablo rosser 2009 COLABORADOR HONORÍFICO UNIVERSIDAD ALICANTE

Revealing Iberian Woodcraft: Conserved Wooden Artefacts From South-East Spain, Pablo Rosser

pablo rosser

Yolanda Carrion & Pablo Rosser Six wells at Tossal de les Basses in Spain captured a large assemblage of Iberian woodworking debris. The authors’ analysis distinguishes a wide variety of boxes, handles, staves, pegs and joinery made in different and appropriate types of wood, some – like cypress – imported from some distance away. We have here a glimpse of a sophisticated and little known industry of the fourth century BC.


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