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Haunted Housewives: Shirley Jackson’S Domestic Gothic, Caroline Kessler 2019 College of William and Mary

Haunted Housewives: Shirley Jackson’S Domestic Gothic, Caroline Kessler

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In her day, Shirley Jackson was known as the author of both haunting supernatural tales and anecdotal women’s fiction. These seemingly disparate genres find common ground in their interest in the home and particularly a woman’s fraught relationship with notions of domesticity. By reading Jackson’s final three novels The Haunting of Hill House, We Have Always Lived in the Castle, and Come Along with Me in the light of mid-twentieth century women’s issues, her use of the gothic emerges as a form of social critique of middle-class America. Comparing the gothic notion of reality/unreality to ...


Thoughtful Books And Thoughtful Lives: Androgyny And Gender Dynamics In The Works Of Sherwood Anderson, Rick Stevenson 2019 College of William and Mary

Thoughtful Books And Thoughtful Lives: Androgyny And Gender Dynamics In The Works Of Sherwood Anderson, Rick Stevenson

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper explores the relationships between men and women in the novels and short stories of Sherwood Anderson, looking specifically at instances of androgynous gender behavior and the connection of gender identity to industrialization, urbanization, and mass media.


Folklore-In-The-Making: Analyzing Shakespeare's The Tempest And Adaptations As Folklore, Heather Talbot 2019 Brigham Young University - Provo

Folklore-In-The-Making: Analyzing Shakespeare's The Tempest And Adaptations As Folklore, Heather Talbot

All Student Publications

This paper explores the similarities between folklore and Shakespeare's play,The Tempest. Not only is The Tempest an example of a folkloric story, this paper looks at how this play calls to attention the importance of story and the need for story to adapt in order to survive. Folklore is an oral tradition that is living, or continually adapting. Shakespeare's plays, while written are also performances which can be adapted through interpretations and by adapting to new genres. It is this adaptability which allows Shakespeare's works to continue to thrive and it is this adaptability which will ...


Rewriting Women: A Feminist Examination Of Lolita's And Pride And Prejudice's Costume And Revisionist Adaptations, Courtney A. DuChene Ms. 2019 Ursinus College

Rewriting Women: A Feminist Examination Of Lolita's And Pride And Prejudice's Costume And Revisionist Adaptations, Courtney A. Duchene Ms.

English Honors Papers

This project examines costume and revisionist media adaptations of Lolita and Pride and Prejudice to see how adapters have altered the texts in order to increase the agency of the female characters. It consists of four chapters: one on the 1962 and 1997 cinematic costume adaptations of Lolita; one on the 1995 BBC mini series and the 2005 film costume adaptations of Pride and Prejudice; one on the Pride and Prejudice revisionist adaptations, Bridget Jones’s Diary (2001) and the 2012-2013 Youtube series The Lizzie Bennet Diaries; and one on the revisionist film adaptations of Lolita, The Diary of a ...


Strict Restraints: Abstinence's Gender Problems In Measure For Measure, Joseph Makuc 2019 Ursinus College

Strict Restraints: Abstinence's Gender Problems In Measure For Measure, Joseph Makuc

History Honors Papers

Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure poses questions about sexual coercion and governmental corruption that resonate today. Recent scholarship has examined sexual abstinence in Measure for Measure in terms of its historical economic and religious context regarding Isabella. However, Angelo and the Duke, the play's other central characters, also make claims about the value of abstinence. I put these characters’ claims into dialogue with Judith Butler’s theory of gender performativity and extensive scholarship on Shakespearean England. I argue that abstinence is the axis around which Measure’s main characters revolve, and that Measure locates these characters’ abstinences as competing ...


Music, Shakespeare, And Redefined Catharsis, Megan Jae Hatt 2019 Brigham Young University

Music, Shakespeare, And Redefined Catharsis, Megan Jae Hatt

All Student Publications

The definition of catharsis has changed since the time of Aristotle. A person does not only experience catharsis out of pity or fear from theatric tragedies; they also experience it through laughter, love, and simply immersing themselves into the emotions presented by different forms of media. This essay reviews the catharsis one can experience through contemporary music and Shakespeare as they become submersed in the emotions and spectacle of each respective media. In this essay, I compare and contrast contemporary music and Shakespeare text and performance in order to relate them to this new definition of catharsis by including different ...


“More Free Than He Is Jealous”: Female Agency And Solidarity In The Winter’S Tale, Stacey K. Mooney 2019 St. John Fisher College

“More Free Than He Is Jealous”: Female Agency And Solidarity In The Winter’S Tale, Stacey K. Mooney

The Review: A Journal of Undergraduate Student Research

No abstract provided.


Brennan, Mary Kate (Fa 1284), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives 2019 Western Kentucky University

Brennan, Mary Kate (Fa 1284), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

FA Finding Aids

Finding aid only for Folklife Archives Project 1284. Student interview conducted by Mary Kate Brennan with renowned Appalachian poet Jim Wayne Miller. Brennan’s focus throughout the interview is on “the cultural sensitivity and awareness that permeates Miller’s poetry.” Miller also touches on what he considers to be the central themes of his work, the struggles and triumphs of communities within the Appalachian region, and pride in cultural heritage. The collection contains a detailed index, interview summary, transcription, index cards with questions, and a reel-to-reel audio tape of the interview.


How To Build A Museum, Anna L. Davies 2019 Ohio Wesleyan University

How To Build A Museum, Anna L. Davies

Student Symposium

Who are museums for? This question drove our research. Originally motivated by a Travel-Learning Course in Spring 2017 to Manchester, London, and Liverpool, this project seeks to explore the narratives, motivations, and cultural implications for museum exhibits. We focused particularly on art museums. Our primary inspiration was the International Museum of Slavery at the Maritime Museum (Liverpool) and the London, Sugar and Slavery exhibit at the Museum of London Docklands (London). While both historical exhibits, we wanted to examine the symbolism and motivations for creating these exhibits as a form of public history and consciousness in Britain, and apply it ...


How To Build A Museum, Anna L. Davies 2019 Ohio Wesleyan University

How To Build A Museum, Anna L. Davies

Student Symposium

No abstract provided.


The Monkey Wrench Gang: The Impact Of The Views Of Native Americans On Abbey’S Stance On Ecosabotage, Anna Wurzer 2019 Carroll College

The Monkey Wrench Gang: The Impact Of The Views Of Native Americans On Abbey’S Stance On Ecosabotage, Anna Wurzer

Carroll College Student Undergraduate Research Festival

This research analyzes racism in The Monkey Wrench Gang according to the characters in the novel and Abbey’s viewpoint. The characters in the novel express racist remarks about the Native Americans frequently, whereas Abbey often writes in favor of Native Americans and their struggle. This apparent contradiction exposes how Abbey writes about the Native Americans in the text as a victim of learned helplessness. In doing this, he exposes a fault of ecosabotage by providing an example of how it has failed in the past when the Native Americans fought against the government and the forces of industrialism. Through ...


Children As The Power Of Shakespeare, Samantha Rowley 2019 Brigham Young University

Children As The Power Of Shakespeare, Samantha Rowley

All Student Publications

An dive into how children are used in Shakespeare’s plays and sonnets. While there has been some extensive research on numerous of Shakespeare’s minor characters, some of his other characters, the minors, have been focused on less. Because they fly under the radar, Shakespeare uses these “minor” characters in order to subtly manipulate his audience, using them as a source of pathos in much the same way adults use children to manipulate audiences while silencing the actual opinions of the children they claim to represent. However, though he may often use children for this effect due to their ...


Choosing Advocacy, 2019 Bank Street College of Education

Choosing Advocacy

Occasional Paper Series

Two articles comprise this publication. In "Beyond the Story-Book Ending: Literature for Young Children About Parental Estrangement and Loss," Megan Matt analyzes over 30 books for young children on the topics of abandonment, estrangement, divorce, and foster care. She observes that this loss might appear as an event within the story or as a fear articulated by a young child. She states that, as an educator, she hopes that she can make the children realize that their own stories are "real" and legitimate, no matter what messages they might encounter or fail to encounter in the media. In "Walking the ...


Two Poems: Stop Time Before; Forsaken Ones, Ánh-Hoa Thị Nguyễn 2019 St. Catherine University

Two Poems: Stop Time Before; Forsaken Ones, Ánh-Hoa Thị Nguyễn

Journal of Southeast Asian American Education and Advancement

This creative work features two poems: Stop Time Before; Forsaken Ones


“New Hope In The Midst Of Darkness”: Eucatastrophe As Kairos In The Lord Of The Rings, Chance Gamble 2019 University of Texas at Tyler

“New Hope In The Midst Of Darkness”: Eucatastrophe As Kairos In The Lord Of The Rings, Chance Gamble

English Department Theses

Present-day rhetorical scholarship has largely rectified the neglect of kairos James Kinneavy noted in 1986. However, the ancient Greek concept combining temporal-spatial factors, due measure, situational adaptability, and perfect timing has not seen much use in the rhetorical study of fiction. The application of kairos, a foundational rhetorical device, to fiction has the potential to generate new insights on familiar subject matter. J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings (LOTR) may seem an unlikely choice for such inquiry, but there are several factors that make it especially suited to such analysis. Chief among these are the numerous ...


Marital Law In He Knew He Was Right, Suzanne Raitt 2019 College of William and Mary

Marital Law In He Knew He Was Right, Suzanne Raitt

Suzanne Raitt

Bringing together leading and newly emerging scholars, The Routledge Research Companion to Anthony Trollope offers a comprehensive overview of Trollope scholarship and suggests new directions in Trollope studies. The first volume designed especially for advanced graduate students and scholars, the collection features essays on virtually every topic relevant to Trollope research, including the law, gender, politics, evolution, race, anti-Semitism, biography, philosophy, illustration, aging, sport, emigration, and the global and regional worlds.


"Contagious Ectasy": May Sinclair's War Journals, Suzanne Raitt 2019 College of William and Mary

"Contagious Ectasy": May Sinclair's War Journals, Suzanne Raitt

Suzanne Raitt

The Great War stimulated a sudden growth in the novel industry, and the trauma of the war continued to reverberate through much of the fiction published in the years that followed its inglorious end. The essays in this volume, by a number of leading critics in the field, considers some of the best-known, and some of the least-known, women writers on whose work the war left its shadow. Ranging from Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, and H.D. to Vernon Lee, Frances Bellerby, and Mary Butts, the contributors challenge current thinking about women's responses to the First World War and ...


“We Rise From Death And Live” Trilogy, Majic Ring, And H.D.’S Spiritualist War Poetics, Isabel Rae McKenzie 2019 Lake Forest College

“We Rise From Death And Live” Trilogy, Majic Ring, And H.D.’S Spiritualist War Poetics, Isabel Rae Mckenzie

Senior Theses

This thesis reads the American expatriate poet H.D.’s tripartite poem Trilogy, composed in London during World War Two, as a spiritualist war epic. Though the influence of occultism on H.D.’s work has been given more critical attention in recent years, her foray into spiritualism remains relatively unstudied. The primary aim of this project is to illustrate how H.D.’s experiences in spiritualist séances during the war years, as depicted in the recently published autobiographical text Majic Ring (composed 1943-1944, published 2009), shaped the writing of her modernist epic and its optimistic vision of worldwide spiritual ...


Politicized Identity In Peter Ho Davies's The Welsh Girl And The Fortunes, Savanna S. Batson 2019 University of Texas at Tyler

Politicized Identity In Peter Ho Davies's The Welsh Girl And The Fortunes, Savanna S. Batson

English Department Theses

This thesis explores the effects of politicized identities on the basis of particular aspects of an individual’s being, such as gender, ethnicity, or nationality in Peter Ho Davies’s novels The Welsh Girl (2007) and The Fortunes (2016). By carefully studying each of his protagonists within the context of the particular time and place in which they have come of age, and are now living, this thesis demonstrates how Davies engages with themes of identity, community, and alienation relative to the specific socio-cultural matrix that informs the politicization of identities at their time. It explores how Davies’s characters ...


Languages Killing Languages: A Rhetorical Analysis Of The Media Portrayal Of The Struggle Between English And Arabic, Denise Muro 2019 University of Northern Colorado

Languages Killing Languages: A Rhetorical Analysis Of The Media Portrayal Of The Struggle Between English And Arabic, Denise Muro

Ursidae: The Undergraduate Research Journal at the University of Northern Colorado

The English language has grown to become international, but at the same time, many indigenous languages have become endangered and extinct. Recognizing these trends, scholars have begun recording and cataloging endangered languages. Though Arabic is not considered to be an endangered language, the physical and cultural presence and influence of the West in the Middle East, makes the issue pertinent and popular media has addressed it as well. Articles and speeches addressing the trend of the globalizing English language and the endangerment and extinction of indigenous languages have joined the discussion. 65 arguments from popular media sources against the globalization ...


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