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Snakeskins, Sunsets, And Seeing: Creation And Theodicy In Pilgrim At Tinker Creek, Madeline Perkins 2019 Samford University

Snakeskins, Sunsets, And Seeing: Creation And Theodicy In Pilgrim At Tinker Creek, Madeline Perkins

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

In Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, Annie Dillard uses nature to talk about philosophical and spiritual topics. She exercises the habit of seeing, which is both passive observation and active creation, and uses it to explore questions of God’s goodness, or theodicy. Dillard’s creation—Pilgrim at Tinker Creek—does not deny that both cruel things and beautiful things exist in God’s creation. Dillard instead proposes that “[t]he answer must be . . . that beauty and grace are performed whether or not we will or sense them. The least we can do is try to be there” (Pilgrim 10). The ...


Searching For Purpose: Silas House’S The Coal Tattoo, Brooke E. Boling 2019 University of Louisville

Searching For Purpose: Silas House’S The Coal Tattoo, Brooke E. Boling

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

This paper examines The Coal Tattoo by Silas House and its focus on psychological self-reflection by its two main characters, Easter and Anneth Sizemore. Anneth, the younger of the sisters, is characterized as a “wild child,” chasing after men and sex in an attempt to discover her identity and fulfill a longing within her that may be too large to satisfy. The Sizemore girls’ mother, Birdie, committed suicide when Anneth was five years old. Through a Lacanian lens, Anneth’s entrance into subjectivity is a violent and incomplete one, which evolves into an incomplete sense of her “imaginary” self and ...


Taking Back Control: Memes, Trump, 4chan, Gamergate, And The Rise Of The Alt-Right, Cam Fediuk 2019 Western University

Taking Back Control: Memes, Trump, 4chan, Gamergate, And The Rise Of The Alt-Right, Cam Fediuk

Western Research Forum

Background

My thesis’s impetus is the rise of reactionary discourse on the internet, collectively known as the alt-right. As with the traditional right, the alt-right is anti-feminist, anti-immigration, and anti-political-correctness, but unlike its predecessor, is also anti-establishment, anti-religion, pro-Donald Trump, and thoroughly engaged with and immersed in the meme-based political discourse of digital media.

Hypothesis

I argue against the cyber-utopianism proposed by Douglass Rushkoff and other early internet theorists; I argue that, while the internet has made memes central to political discourse, the rise of laissez-faire social media platforms has not made the digital generation more enlightened, or tolerant ...


Intimate Fictions: The Rhetorical Strategies Of Obscene Violence In Four Novels, Steven Monk 2019 Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College

Intimate Fictions: The Rhetorical Strategies Of Obscene Violence In Four Novels, Steven Monk

LSU Doctoral Dissertations

Richard Wright, Marlon James, Cormac McCarthy and Ken Levine are each celebrated in their respective fields but notorious for their obscene depictions of violence. Contrary to trauma theorists’ claims that violence shatters language and cannot be spoken, these writers speak violence in its most disturbing forms: torn eyeballs, dead infants, forced fecal consumption and mechanized rape. I argue that obscene violence, much like obscene language, creates a space of intimacy in which transgressive, subversive and oppositional thoughts may be spoken. By alienating their texts from the larger reading public, these writers entice a smaller group of sympathetic readers to develop ...


Overcoming Doubt In A Spiritual Narrative: The Challenges Jarena Lee Faced In Pursuit Of Her Calling, Emily Dietrich 2019 Lake Forest College

Overcoming Doubt In A Spiritual Narrative: The Challenges Jarena Lee Faced In Pursuit Of Her Calling, Emily Dietrich

Inter-Text: An Undergraduate Journal for Social Sciences and Humanities

No abstract provided.


Romance Novels And Higher Education, Rebecca Reitemeier 2019 Lake Forest College

Romance Novels And Higher Education, Rebecca Reitemeier

Inter-Text: An Undergraduate Journal for Social Sciences and Humanities

No abstract provided.


Anthropocene Blues By John Lane, Jessica S. Cory 2019 Western Carolina University

Anthropocene Blues By John Lane, Jessica S. Cory

The Goose

Review of John Lane's Anthropocene Blues


Ph: A Novel By Nancy Lord, Jennifer Schell 2019 University of Alaska Fairbanks

Ph: A Novel By Nancy Lord, Jennifer Schell

The Goose

Review of Nancy Lord's pH: A Novel


Shale Play: Poems And Photographs From The Fracking Fields By Julia Spicher Kasdorf And Steven Rubin, Kelly Shepherd 2019 Northern Alberta Institute of Technology

Shale Play: Poems And Photographs From The Fracking Fields By Julia Spicher Kasdorf And Steven Rubin, Kelly Shepherd

The Goose

Review of Julia Spicher Kasdorf and Steven Rubin's Shale Play: Poems and Photographs from the Fracking Fields


Critical Introduction: Responsibility And Representation & Introduction To All My Mother’S Lovers, Ilana Masad 2019 University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Critical Introduction: Responsibility And Representation & Introduction To All My Mother’S Lovers, Ilana Masad

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research: Department of English

This critical component of the creative thesis All My Mother’s Lovers explores the question of fiction writers’ responsibility to themselves, their work, and their readers in the age of social media and easy access of readers to writers and vice versa. Using two examples of recent online controversies, this piece explores the varying ways in which readers respond to writers and writers to readers and rhetorically analyzes the responses of those in positions of power (writers, publishers) as well as the cultural contexts from within which they respond. It then draws conclusions as to the trajectory of these two ...


Dramatizing The Void: Crime Fiction's Journey To Forgetting, Kylene N. Cave 2019 Michigan State University

Dramatizing The Void: Crime Fiction's Journey To Forgetting, Kylene N. Cave

Andrews Research Conference

Scholars often cite the transition from the golden age to the hardboiled tradition in the 1920s and 1930s as the most radical shift in crime fiction. By 1945, crime stories regularly exhibited destabilized language, increased interest in psychology of the mind, and a blatant rejection of conclusive endings as a means of exploring the unreliable nature of memory and eye-witness testimony. Whereas the crime fiction narratives preceding 1945 embodied a clear sense of logic and order, and established hermeneutics and signifying practices as the keys to unlocking the mysteries behind human behavior; post-45 crime fiction not only rejects these notions ...


John Gardner’S Grendel: The Importance Of Community In Making Moral Art, Catherine C. Cooper 2019 University of New Orleans

John Gardner’S Grendel: The Importance Of Community In Making Moral Art, Catherine C. Cooper

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

John Gardner’s Grendel examines the ways in which humans make meaning out of their lives. By changing the original Beowulf monster into a creature who constantly questions the conflicting narratives set before him, Gardner encourages us to confront these tensions also. However, his emphasis on Grendel’s alienation helps us realize that community is essential to creating meaning. Most obviously, community creates relationships that foster a sense of moral obligation between its members, even in the face of the type of uncertainty felt by Grendel. Moreover, community cannot exist without dialogue, which perpetually stimulates the imagination to respond to ...


“To Be Men, Not Destroyers”: Developing Dabrowskian Personalities In Ezra Pound’S The Cantos And Neil Gaiman’S American Gods, Michelle A. Nicholson 2019 University of New Orleans, New Orleans

“To Be Men, Not Destroyers”: Developing Dabrowskian Personalities In Ezra Pound’S The Cantos And Neil Gaiman’S American Gods, Michelle A. Nicholson

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

Kazimierz Dabrowski’s psychological theory of positive disintegration is a lesser known theory of personality development that offers an alternative critical perspective of literature. It provides a framework for the characterization of postmodern protagonists who move beyond heroic indoctrination to construct their own self-organized, autonomous identities. Ezra Pound’s The Cantos captures the speaker-poet’s extensive process of inner conflict, providing a unique opportunity to track the progress of the hero’s transformation into a personality, or a man. American Gods is a more fully realized portrayal of a character who undergoes the complete paradigmatic collapse of positive disintegration and ...


Fire To Vellum, Jessica L. Warren 2019 Missouri State University

Fire To Vellum, Jessica L. Warren

MSU Graduate Theses

Oswic’s simple life changed the day his mother died from poison. After finding a strange cache of trinkets and books in the loft of the barn, he begins to question everything and everyone he has known, including reality. Forced from his land and his home, Oswic takes his plough horse, the few fragments of truth from his life, and leaves Hægelfirth in search of the one person he believes can tell him of his past, the storyteller. But, it won’t be his past he needs to worry about when he starts to slip in and out of reality ...


Session 1.2: Teaching Bc Literature: Ecocriticism, Eco-Grief, And Rage, Richard Pickard 2019 University of Victoria

Session 1.2: Teaching Bc Literature: Ecocriticism, Eco-Grief, And Rage, Richard Pickard

BC Studies Conference

Ecocriticism’s potential to unsettle literary studies and English departments, through instruments as various as climate change anxiety, animal ethics, and the love of nature, has been a regular theme of field-surveying overviews. From Cheryl Glotfelty’s introduction to the 1996 Ecocriticism Reader, through Ella Soper and Nick Bradley’s to their 2013 Greening the Maple: Canadian Ecocriticism in Context, such overviews provide ecocritics with ready solace and strength for their potentially transformative missions as green researchers, writers, and teachers. This potential, however, remains unrealized. While such principled statements are enabling and empowering, ecocriticism remains to some extent a liberal ...


The Narrative Of Revolution: Socialism And The Masses 1911-1917, Stephen K. Walkiewicz 2019 CUNY Hunter College

The Narrative Of Revolution: Socialism And The Masses 1911-1917, Stephen K. Walkiewicz

School of Arts & Sciences Theses

This thesis seeks to situate The Masses magazine (1911-1917) within a specific discursive tradition of revolution, revealing a narrative pattern that is linked with discourse that began to emerge during and after the French Revolution. As the term “socialism” begins to resonate again within popular American political discourse (and as a potentially viable course of action rather than a curse for damnable offense), it is worthwhile to trace its significance within American history to better understand its aesthetic dimensions, its radical difference, and its way of devising problems and answers. In short, this thesis poses the question: what ideological structures ...


Non/Human: (Re)Seeing The “Animal” In Nineteenth-Century American Literature, Matthew Guzman 2019 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Non/Human: (Re)Seeing The “Animal” In Nineteenth-Century American Literature, Matthew Guzman

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research: Department of English

Non/human: (Re)seeing the “Animal” in Nineteenth-Century American Literature uses canonical literary texts as specific anchor points for charting the unstable relations between human and nonhuman animals throughout the century. I argue that throughout the nineteenth century, there are distinct shifts in the way(s) humans think about, discuss, and represent nonhuman animals, and understanding these shifts can change the way we interpret the literature and the culture(s). Moreover, I supplement and integrate those literary anchors, when appropriate, with texts from contemporaneous science, law, art, and other primary and secondary source materials. For example, the first chapter, “Cooper ...


Paper: Investigating The Work Of William Styron: The Perpetuation Of The Fantastic Hegemonic Imagination, William Sikich 2019 Augustana College, Rock Island Illinois

Paper: Investigating The Work Of William Styron: The Perpetuation Of The Fantastic Hegemonic Imagination, William Sikich

Womanist Ethics

William Styron's Confessions of Nat Turner depicts a fictitious characterization of the historical Nat Turner. Styron, a white southerner, assumes Turner's perspective in order to tell a speculative story about his slave rebellion of 1831. Similarly, he tells the story of a fictional holocaust survivor in his novel, Sophie's Choice. The decision to take on these perspective evinces some arrogance on Styron's part, and the way in which he executes the narrative of each novel delivers their stories with varying levels of respect to their subjects: Styron's indirect telling of Sophie's story allows Styron ...


Recovering Affiliates: Reclassifying Emily Dickinson's Variant Poems, Anna McAnnally 2019 William & Mary

Recovering Affiliates: Reclassifying Emily Dickinson's Variant Poems, Anna Mcannally

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis focuses on the role which variation plays in the poetry of Emily Dickinson. Dickinson used textual variation within her work to create multiple versions of the same poem, often modifying a single word, phrase, or stanza between versions. Many of these variant versions appear in letters to her family and friends, or in the context of her fascicles, which served as her own personal version of publication. As Dickinson titled very few of her poems, scholars refer to each of them by their first lines, thus assuming that all poems sharing a first line are versions of the ...


Haunted Housewives: Shirley Jackson’S Domestic Gothic, Caroline Kessler 2019 William & Mary

Haunted Housewives: Shirley Jackson’S Domestic Gothic, Caroline Kessler

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In her day, Shirley Jackson was known as the author of both haunting supernatural tales and anecdotal women’s fiction. These seemingly disparate genres find common ground in their interest in the home and particularly a woman’s fraught relationship with notions of domesticity. By reading Jackson’s final three novels The Haunting of Hill House, We Have Always Lived in the Castle, and Come Along with Me in the light of mid-twentieth century women’s issues, her use of the gothic emerges as a form of social critique of middle-class America. Comparing the gothic notion of reality/unreality to ...


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