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Literature in English, North America, Ethnic and Cultural Minority Commons

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‘Stations Of A Mourner’S Cross’: Samuel Beckett, Killiney, 1954, Graley Herren 2013 Xavier University

‘Stations Of A Mourner’S Cross’: Samuel Beckett, Killiney, 1954, Graley Herren

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Manifesting Stories: The Progression Of Comics From Print To Web To Print, Hannah Fattor 2013 University of Puget Sound

Manifesting Stories: The Progression Of Comics From Print To Web To Print, Hannah Fattor

Summer Research

Publishing comics via the Internet is a growing practice among creative individuals who desire artistic and personal autonomy, and also wish to share a diverse range of stories. These webcomics have expanded the creative boundaries of storytelling with the digital medium. Additionally, publishing on the Internet offers the possibility to engage with markets that print comic books have ignored (particularly stories about minorities, stories which contain explicit or crude content, and stories with character designs deemed 'unattractive' and therefore unmarketable). Despite these opportunities the Internet presents, webcomics have returned to print culture as webcomic creators seek to print their webcomics ...


"Collective Commerce And The Problem Of Autobiography", Andrew Kopec 2012 Indiana University - Purdue University Fort Wayne

"Collective Commerce And The Problem Of Autobiography", Andrew Kopec

Andrew Kopec

This essay partakes in an ongoing conversation about the importance of economics to Olaudah Equiano's slave narrative. I argue that Equiano's text links the singular autobiographical subject to a future collective of Africans schooled in the protocols of international commerce. Equiano's text, I suggest, imagines this collective commerce as a solution to the evils of chattel slavery.


Upon Provincialism: Southern Literature And National Periodical Culture, 1870-1900, Bill Hardwig 2012 University of Tennessee - Knoxville

Upon Provincialism: Southern Literature And National Periodical Culture, 1870-1900, Bill Hardwig

Bill Hardwig

Upon Provincialism: Southern Literature and National Periodical Culture, 1870-1900 was published by the University of Virginia Press in 2013. Drawing on tourist literature, travelogues, and local-color fiction about the South, Upon Provincialism tracks the ways in which the nation’s leading interdisciplinary periodicals, especially the Atlantic Monthly, Harper’s, and the Century, translated and broadcast the predominant narratives about the late-nineteenth-century South. The book argues that fears about national unity, immigration, industrialization, and racial dynamics in the South could be explored through the safe and displaced realm of a regional literature that was often seen as mere entertainment or as ...


"Simple" Takes On The Supreme Court, Robert Tsai 2012 American University

"Simple" Takes On The Supreme Court, Robert Tsai

Robert L Tsai

This essay assesses black literature as a medium for working out popular understandings of America’s Constitution and laws. Starting in the 1940s, Langston Hughes’s fictional character, Jesse B. Semple, began appearing in the prominent black newspaper, the Chicago Defender. The figure affectionately known as “Simple” was undereducated, unsophisticated, and plain spoken - certainly to a fault according to prevailing standards of civility, race relations, and professional attainment. Butthese very traits, along with a gritty experience under Jim Crow, made him not only a sympathetic figure but also an armchair legal theorist. In a series of barroom conversations, Simple ably ...


Now We Want Our Funk Cut: Janelle Monáe’S Neo-Afrofuturism, Daylanne English, Alvin Kim 2012 Macalester College

Now We Want Our Funk Cut: Janelle Monáe’S Neo-Afrofuturism, Daylanne English, Alvin Kim

Daylanne English

No abstract provided.


Teaching Texts Materially: The Ends Of Nella Larsen’S Passing, John K. Young 2012 Marshall University

Teaching Texts Materially: The Ends Of Nella Larsen’S Passing, John K. Young

John K. Young

The author suggests that attending to the publishing history of Larsen’s novel and the resulting indeterminacy of its ending(s) offers a concrete example of a materially oriented pedagogy that can illuminate the racial politics behind textual production and its relation to particular historical and cultural moments. He suggests that such a pedagogy offers both another way of understanding the textual contingency emphasized in contemporary theory and a way of further opening up questions of textuality and meaning for students.


Telling God’S Sanction : Storytelling In The Narrative Journalism, Memoirs, And Creative Nonfiction Of Rick Bragg, Jennifer Nicole Sias 2012 Marshall University

Telling God’S Sanction : Storytelling In The Narrative Journalism, Memoirs, And Creative Nonfiction Of Rick Bragg, Jennifer Nicole Sias

Jennifer N Sias

Self-described paid-storyteller and Pulitzer-Prize-winning-narrative-journalist, Rick Bragg has used the storytelling techniques he learned from his people to write two best-selling memoirs that redefine the boundaries of the genres of memoir and creative nonfiction. His speakerly texts combine the voices of the working class of the Alabama foothills of Appalachia, his own voice as a member of this culture, and his narrative journalistic voice. In his works, Bragg has managed not only to carve a place for the voice of the working class, but also to celebrate and preserve the oral culture, history, and beautiful language of his people, the working ...


Angel Island Poetry: Reading And Writing Cultures, Adam Kotlarczyk 2012 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Angel Island Poetry: Reading And Writing Cultures, Adam Kotlarczyk

Adam Kotlarczyk

Object of a darker chapter in American history, the Angel Island Poems (as they have become known) are a recently discovered body of over 135 poems, written primarily in Chinese. These were literally carved into the walls at the Angel Island Immigration Station, where Chinese immigrants were detained, sometimes indefinitely, between approximately 1910-1940. This lesson demonstrates how history and culture can be integral to our understanding of poetry, even poetry that is deeply reflective and personal in nature; by requiring students to model and produce their own poetry, it also makes evident that writing poetry is a creative instinct and ...


How Does A Bulldagger Get Out Of The Footnote? Or Gladys Bentley's Blues, Regina V. Jones 2012 Indiana University - Northwest

How Does A Bulldagger Get Out Of The Footnote? Or Gladys Bentley's Blues, Regina V. Jones

ninepatch: A Creative Journal for Women and Gender Studies

No abstract provided.


Who's Your Daddy?: Representations Of Masculinity And Coming Of Age In Television’S The Vampire Diaries, Kimberley McMahon-Coleman 2012 University of Wollongong, Shoalhaven Campus

Who's Your Daddy?: Representations Of Masculinity And Coming Of Age In Television’S The Vampire Diaries, Kimberley Mcmahon-Coleman

Kimberley McMahon-Coleman

Fantasy narratives often use the metaphor of the werewolf for the adolescent identity-forming process. The Vampire Diaries goes one step further in the character of Tyler Lockwood, a teen wolf/vampire hybrid. An aggressive and abused teen, Tyler loses his father in Season 1 and his replacement father figure, a paternal uncle, in Season 2. In Season 3, he is “sired” by the Original hybrid, Klaus. In the face of these competing influences, Tyler struggles to come to terms with his own identity. The program uses the fictional township of Mystic Falls, populated by witches, werewolves, vampires and ghosts, to ...


Trans-Spatiality As The Horizon Of The Coming Community: Ethico-Ontology And Aesthetics In Asian Immigrant Literature, Dae-Joong Kim 2012 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Trans-Spatiality As The Horizon Of The Coming Community: Ethico-Ontology And Aesthetics In Asian Immigrant Literature, Dae-Joong Kim

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research: Department of English

This study centers on the potential scope and significance of trans-spatiality as a new literary concept. I employ the concept of trans-spatiality as a means of understanding Asian immigrants’ transnational experiences as represented by Asian immigrant writers in the Anglophone world. Trans-spatiality is a grounding term and methodological orientation, and its scope is relational and appositional. Thus, previous studies such as postcolonialism, cosmopolitanism, transnationalism, diaspora studies, and globalization are related to trans-spatiality, but, in this dissertation, I strictly limit its use to an ethico-ontological and aesthetic understanding of Asian immigrant writers’ literary works. For this methodology, I explore and analyze ...


Solitary Cypress, David L. Cooper 2012 Jefferson Community and Technical College

Solitary Cypress, David L. Cooper

David L Cooper

published in the summer solstice issue of Muse Magazine.


Angel Island Poetry: Reading And Writing Cultures, Adam Kotlarczyk 2012 Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Angel Island Poetry: Reading And Writing Cultures, Adam Kotlarczyk

Understanding Poetry

Object of a darker chapter in American history, the Angel Island Poems (as they have become known) are a recently discovered body of over 135 poems, written primarily in Chinese. These were literally carved into the walls at the Angel Island Immigration Station, where Chinese immigrants were detained, sometimes indefinitely, between approximately 1910-1940.

This lesson demonstrates how history and culture can be integral to our understanding of poetry, even poetry that is deeply reflective and personal in nature; by requiring students to model and produce their own poetry, it also makes evident that writing poetry is a creative instinct and ...


Destruction As A Necessity For Creation In Ellison’S Invisible Man, Alyssa Sellers 2012 North Georgia College and State University

Destruction As A Necessity For Creation In Ellison’S Invisible Man, Alyssa Sellers

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

Most African and African American literature, art, and culture is centered around a type of performance characterized by improvisation and therefore essentially based on greater freedom than more heavily scripted performance traditions. In this way, acting becomes a means of gaining power over oppression by taking an art form that is traditionally based in strict role playing and turning it in to a form of individual expression necessary to creating an identity. Ralph Ellison employs this technique in his novel Invisible Man, using traditional facets of performance such as dialogue, scenery, props, and music, which once stripped of their foundation ...


Traumatic And Healing Memory In Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony And Toni Morrison's Song Of Solomon, Ambata K. Kazi-Nance 2012 University of New Orleans

Traumatic And Healing Memory In Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony And Toni Morrison's Song Of Solomon, Ambata K. Kazi-Nance

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

A comparative analysis of Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony and Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon, with a focus on individual as well as collective memory work in historically marginalized indigenous and African-American communities, respectively. This represents a critical study of how the novels invoke progressive and redemptive models of remembering, as well as foreground the role of spiritual guides in the transformative process from trauma towards healing.


A Western Man Of Color: Richard Wright And The World, Guy J. Reynolds 2012 University of Nebraska-Lincoln

A Western Man Of Color: Richard Wright And The World, Guy J. Reynolds

Guy J Reynolds

Richard Wright had become by the mid 50s an analyst of what it means to be ‘of’ the West. He was by now a firmly-established émigré, and had become a French citizen in 1947. His journeys, in a way, had only just become: Europe was a stage or an inauguration into further mappings of the self and society. Those mappings took the extraordinary geo-political shifts of the mid-century as their subject. In the wake of the Second World War, severely damaged economically and in terms of sheer power, European nations were finally forced to give ground to the nationalist movements ...


The Sacred Role Of Animal Beings In Iroquois Lore, Melissa J. Martinelli 2012 Buffalo State

The Sacred Role Of Animal Beings In Iroquois Lore, Melissa J. Martinelli

English Theses

The act of storytelling provides a connection between the spiritual and physical spheres, and the Haudenosaunee people (more commonly recognized as Iroquois) utilize the oral narrative to convey the most sacred truths of their culture. In focusing primarily upon animals and animal beings, one can recognize the deep reverence traditional tribal members feel toward animals as certain legends seek to unite individuals with the spirits, personalities, and bodies of such creatures in narrative form. Too often animals are overlooked as “lesser” beings, yet in legends of the Iroquois they possess potent orenda (great power) that can help one achieve success ...


No Place Like Home: Fiction Of Scandinavian Women And The American Prairie, Rebecca Frances Crockett 2012 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

No Place Like Home: Fiction Of Scandinavian Women And The American Prairie, Rebecca Frances Crockett

Masters Theses

This thesis examines various fictional depictions of Scandinavian pioneer women and their struggle to adapt to the American prairie. It looks specifically at three novels: Johan Bojer’s The Emigrants, O.E. Rolvaag’s Giants in the Earth, and Willa Cather’s O Pioneers!. All three novels depict Scandinavian immigrant groups who settle in the Great Plains area during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

The thesis looks in detail at the numerous ways in which each author’s female characters adapt or fail to adapt to the landscape, exploring the possible reasons for these successes and failures. It ...


Paradox Of The Abject: Postcolonial Subjectivity In Jamaica Kincaid’S The Autobiography Of My Mother And Cristina García’S Dreaming In Cuban, Allison Nicole Harris 2012 University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Paradox Of The Abject: Postcolonial Subjectivity In Jamaica Kincaid’S The Autobiography Of My Mother And Cristina García’S Dreaming In Cuban, Allison Nicole Harris

Masters Theses

In Powers of Horror, Julia Kristeva defines abjection as the seductive and destructive remainder of the process of entering the symbolic space of the father and leaving the pre-symbolic space of the mother, resulting in a desire to return to the jouissance of the pre-symbolic space. In this project, I read Jamaica Kincaid’s The Autobiography of My Mother as an attempt to link Xuela’s psychic abjection with the postcolonial identity. Xuela exists on the boundaries of the colonial dichotomy, embracing the space of the abject because she is haunted by her dead mother. She cannot return to her ...


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